AES Student Blog

 

AES 140 Meet the Judges! Ian Kagey

AES 140 Meet the Judges! Ian Kagey

Ian Kagey is an experienced sound technician, engineer, and musician with skills in live and studio recording, sound design, editing and mixing. He is currently one of the faculty members of the Music Production, Technology, and Innovation Masters Program offered by Berklee College of Music, as well as Chief Engineer of the Berklee Valencia Campus.

A graduate of Berklee College of Music, the New York state native started his professional career at New York City’s MSR Studios (formerly Right Track Recording) as technician and an assistant engineer. At MSR, Ian worked on many diverse sessions ranging from Broadway shows such as ‘Book of Mormon’, ‘Catch Me if You Can’, ‘Anything Goes’ and ‘The Addams Family’; to film mixes such as ‘Extremely Loud Incredibly Close’, ‘The Adjustment Bureau’, and ‘Tower Heist’; as well as popular music recordings with renown artists such as Madonna and The Roots.

Ian has also worked extensively as a freelance engineer, editing and recording for composers including Marc Shaiman, Jason Robert Brown and Joe Iconis, as well as mixing film scores for Lucio Godoy and Laura Karpman.

In the field of sound design, Ian has experience with both professional opera and theatre companies, and worked as the Technical Manager of the National Opera Center in New York helping to open the facility in September of 2012.  


Posted: Friday, April 8, 2016

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AES 140 Meet the Judges! Scott Levine

AES 140 Meet the Judges! Scott Levine

Scott Levine is an engineer at Skywalker Sound in the San Francisco Bay Area. He is a researcher, music mixer and frequent presenter for the Audio Engineering Society. Specializing in immersive theatrical sound, Scott works with sound designers, re-recording mixers and industry professionals to develop tools and workflows to create new audience experiences.

Scott holds a Bachelor’s degree from the University of California, San Diego and a Master’s degree from McGill University’s graduate program in Sound Recording where he was a member of the Virtual Acoustics Laboratory as well as the Small Environment Acoustics Researching & Testing Lab. He has previously chaired AES convention paper sessions, and has received a gold award in the AES student recording competition.



Posted: Thursday, April 7, 2016

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AES 140 Meet the Sponsors! Solid State Logic

AES 140 Meet the Sponsors! Solid State Logic

From groundbreaking audio consoles to innovative video production systems, Solid State Logic has evolved to become the world’s leading manufacturer of analogue and digital audio consoles and provider of creative tools for film, audio, video and broadcast professionals.

With more than 3000 SSL-equipped studios and facilities operational today, the excellence of SSL consoles is universally recognised for unrivalled sonic quality, superb ergonomics, outstanding automation and an international support infrastructure second to none.

Founded by Colin Sanders in 1969, SSL has since expanded to its present 15 acre science park in Oxfordshire, England. SSL's unrivalled resources, including R&D, manufacturing, training, service and product support, operate in a unique high technology, customer oriented environment.  The company invents, designs and manufactures technology for the creative manipulation of sound. Users and industry experts from all over the world visit SSL's Oxford HQ to consult with SSL audio experts and evaluate SSL equipment. There are more than 3000 SSL systems in service around the world.


Posted: Wednesday, April 6, 2016

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AES 140 Meet the Judges! Richard King

AES 140 Meet the Judges! Richard King

Richard King is an Associate Professor in the Music Research Department at the Schulich School of Music of McGill University in Montreal. He is an Educator, Researcher, and a multiple Grammy award winning recording engineer. During last year’s Grammy Awards, Richard was nominated for Best Classical and Non-Classical Engineered album. Richard is also adjunct faculty at the Banff Centre in Alberta, Canada. His research interests include small environment acoustics, the process of music mixing, and multichannel recording and reproduction in three dimensions. He is currently writing a book entitled Recording Orchestra, which will be released later this as part of the Focal Press “AES presents” series.


Posted: Tuesday, April 5, 2016

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AES 140 Meet the Sponsors! Merging

AES 140 Meet the Sponsors! Merging

Meet Merging, the company that brought the incredible DAW Pyramix into the industry, and one of our sponsors for the student recording competition!

Merging Technologies is the world’s foremost manufacturer of high-resolution digital audio recording systems.  The list of customers reads like a who’s who in the recording industry and recordings made with Merging Technologies’ systems regularly receive the recording industry’s prestigious Grammy® Award. 

The company was founded in 1990 in Chexbres, Switzerland by Claude Cellier; an electronics graduate of the Institute of Technology in Lausanne  Prior to this, Claude worked for the famous Swiss audio maker Nagra Kudelski for 10 years. Within a short time of its founding, Merging quickly established a reputation for their expertise in digital signal processing and associated hardware, and with their Pyramix Virtual Studio, was one of the first companies to produce a DSD recording system. 

In 2007, Claude Cellier was presented with the Audio Engineering Society Fellowship Award  for outstanding contributions to the development of high-performance, high-resolution audio workstations.  Merging Technologies currently has over 20 employees with offices in Switzerland and the UK.

 


Posted: Monday, April 4, 2016

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Up Your Output! 2016 report: 4th edition of AES UK student event moves 'UP! North'

Student discovering a historic soundfield microphone during the event's technical tour


For the first time in 'Up Your Output!'s history, the UK's most relevant audio student event was hosted outside London and moved 'UP! North' to York.

Its fourth instalment demonstrated that the event's established formula is just as effective outside London as it is in the UK's capital: 'UP! North' managed to draw a large crowd of local, national and international students to the University of York's Department of Music for a weekend full of learning, sharing knowledge and making meaningful personal and professional connections.

The event delivered on all the qualities it has become known for since its inception: A two day programme of exhilarating lectures and workshops presented by a lineup of some of the most renowned audio educators and industry professionals, as well as a technical tour of Calrec Audio's headquarters in Hebden Bridge. Further, representatives of a number of event sponsors were present to get in touch with students, give them career advice and the opportunity to go hands-on with their products.

The 'UP!' Committee thanks all presenters, sponsors and volunteers involved and the University of York's Department of Music for making the event possible. The change in location was a big challange for 'Up Your Output!' and it passed with flying colours.

Please visit upyouroutput.com/2016/ for a detailed event report including comprehensive information about speakers and sponsoring companies!

Student discovering a historic soundfield microphone during the event's technical tour.

 

Leslie Gaston-Bird and Jez Wells judging the mixing competition


Report and photos by Simon-Claudius Wystrach.

Up Your Output! website


Posted: Thursday, March 31, 2016

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AES 140 - Education and Career Fair

 The AES Student Delegate Assembly is inviting all educational institutions and audio companies to participate in the AES Education and Career Fair which is scheduled to take place Monday, June 6, 2016, from 10:45 am to 1:00 pm (please note the schedule could change), at the 140th Convention of the Audio Engineering Society in Paris, France.

        

Signup to exhibit here

This event is an opportunity for schools and companies to meet students, inform the audio community about their programs and activities, and to touch base with the future of audio. Everyone is invited to come talk with representatives from the companies and universities and find out more about educational programmes, and job and internship opportunities in the audio industry. Any eligible organisation can get a table at this fair completely FREE of charge, so what are you waiting for? 

We recommend that you bring pamphlets, pictures, audio samples and any other type of media that can appropriately represent your institution or company. Both student and educators are welcome as school ambassadors.  

If you don't represent a school or company at the fair, don't forget to stop by and explore education and career opportunities. 

Space is limited so the sooner you sign up, the better.

See you in Paris!

More Information about Student Events at the 140th AES Convention


Posted: Monday, March 28, 2016

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AES Student News: AES140 Paris, AES141 Los Angeles, and more!

If you are an AES Student Member, you should have received this over email as well. 

If you are not (currently) an AES Student Member, below are a few of the many reasons to change that! 

 

AES140 Paris Student Competitions

AES140 Grab your diaries, clear your schedule: the AES Convention is coming to Paris, and that means the Student Competitions are too! 

Students and recent graduates can participate in the Student Recording Competition and Student Design Competition for which registration will open soon. We want to remind you now, to give you more than enough time to get your project in shape. 

If advice from audio legends, exposure to key players in the audio industry not to mention a very large enthusiastic crowd, a great experience, a fantastic networking opportunity, and an invaluable career boost mean nothing to you, we also have tens of thousands of euros worth of amazing prizes (that's tens of thousands of dollars, too). 

140th International AES Convention: 4-7 June 2016

Student Recording Competition submission deadline: Sunday 1 May 2016

Student Design Competition submission deadline: Sunday 22 May 2016

You can submit as soon as the registration is open, so stay tuned!  

In case you were already planning to come to Paris, it would be silly not to submit your latest or proudest project, whatever it is, to these popular competitions. If you weren't sure yet, then this is one of the many reasons why you should absolutely come. Don't take our word for it, though - ask any student who has ever been to a Convention.
For instance, AES139 Student Competition winners Nick Lobel and Jesse Brock, Daniel Davidsen, James Pinkl, Keifer Wiley, Jennifer Nulsen or Filipe Antunes.  

More information on how, what, why, where and when to submit can be found in the Student Recording Competition and Student Design Competition Rules and Policies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Left: A student explains his hardware design at a very busy Student Design Exhibition at AES138 in Warsaw, Poland. 
Right: Some genius industry experts judge a software project at AES139 in New York. Note the relaxed atmosphere and the smiling student! 

Left: World-renowned engineers take a break from making best-selling records and dusting off Grammys to give ALL STUDENT RECORDING COMPETITION ENTRANTS feedback that will change their lives!
Right: Only four empty chairs in an otherwise packed room, listening intently to an excellent Student Recording Competition submission. 

 

AES141 Los Angeles Student Competitions

SRCSDC

Not so very long after that, the 141th Convention will be taking place in Los Angeles, so you may want to think about your SRC or SDC submission for that one, now that the term is still young!

141th International AES Convention: 29 September - 2 October 2016

Student Recording Competition submission deadline: Sunday 28 August 2016

Student Design Competition submission deadline: Sunday 18 September 2016

 

AES140 Paris - Education & Career Fair Signup

ECF

The AES Student Delegate Assembly is inviting all educational institutions and audio companies to exhibit at and all students, recent graduates and educators to visit the AES Education & Career Fair.

This event is an opportunity for schools and companies to meet students, inform the audio community about their programs and activities, and to touch base with the future of audio. Everyone is invited to come talk with representatives from the companies and universities and find out more about educational programmes, and job and internship opportunities in the audio industry.

We recommend that you bring pamphlets, pictures, audio samples and any other type of media that can appropriately represent your institution or company. We provide some table space, you bring the rest. Exhibiting space is limited though so the sooner you sign up, the better!

* Sign up now to exhibit free of charge!

Student Delegate Assembly Vice Chair Elections

Like with every convention, we are again looking for a new student ambassador to join the ranks of the Student Delegate Assembly. We are just four audio students representing the 4,000 of you, organising the events at the Conventions, supporting student activities and answering queries from all over the world. 

The SDA consists of two representatives for North and Latin America, and two representatives for European and International Regions (i.e. everything that’s not the Americas). At every convention, one Chair retires, one Vice Chair assumes the position of said Chair, and one new recruit joins the ranks as Vice Chair. This June, we regret to say goodbye to Brecht De Man, SDA Chair for Europe and International Regions for one more Convention, as Dave Moffat succeeds him, leaving the Vice Chair position vacant. 

A few things you need in order to qualify: 

  • be an AES student member in any part of the world that’s not North or Latin America;
  • good writing and communication skills;
  • ready to commit to two full years (four Conventions) of organising the student events at the Conventions, being the ‘first line of defense’ of the AES towards students, serving as the interface between the student sections and the professional body of the AES;
  • being present at the 140th Convention in Paris, from the first day when we announce candidates, up until the last day of the Student Program when the election takes place.

Read more about being a student representative on the Student Blog.

If you are interested in running, please contact us at sda@aes-sda.org

 

Student Benefits

As of this month, we want to thank and empower all our AES Student Members by giving them access to a range of freebies and discounts. This is an unconditional, non-expiring gift to each current student member as well as all who sign up from now on.

At the moment, these benefits include:

Talk about value for money! (A student membership to the AES, already packed with value, is a mere $39)

* Claim your benefits now!

AES Student Community

Student Community

Make sure you keep up-to-date and follow the SDA online:

 

All the best from friendly neighbourhood Student Delegate Assembly officers,

Brecht De Man, Chair for Europe and International Regions (@BrechtDeMan)

Zach Bloomstein, Chair for North and Latin America (@ZachBloomstein)

Dave Moffat, Vice Chair for Europe and International Regions (@djmoffat)

Michael France, Vice Chair for North and Latin America


Posted: Tuesday, March 1, 2016

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AES139 Student Recording Competition Winner Interview: Filipe Antunes

 Filipe Antunes's submission received a Gold prize in Category 4 (Sound for Visual Media) at the Student Recording Competition of the 139th AES Convention. 
 
 
Tell us a little bit about yourself. Where are you from? Where and what do you study? What audio field are you in?
I was born and raised in Brazil but my parents came to the US when I was 12 years old. Fast forward many years later, the opportunity came along to study at Berklee College of Music in Boston, and I gladly took it. I am currently enrolled as a dual major in music production and engineering, and electronic production and sound design. I can comfortably say I am in the field of audio post-production for visual media, though I do love recording large ensembles.
 
What initiated your passion for audio? When did it start?
I was exposed to music through my middle school band teacher/mentor; I was hooked into the world of sound. From then I learned to play the trumpet, drums and finally landed on electric bass. As a bass player I would do a lot of recording for friends. I got into many studios through the Boston area, so naturally I got into the technology of recording and developed an appreciation for what is modern day recording. Playing in a band, and going into the studio, opened my mind to the possibility of working in that “behind the scenes” that I find fascinating. It combines the technical and creative aspects of my brain and now that I live it, I can’t get enough of it.
 
Are you a musician yourself? What instruments do you play and in what musical context?
I am a bass player and I’ve been part of an indie alternative rock band in my teens, and then started recording a whole lot.
 
Tell us about the production of your submission. What is the story behind it? What was it inspired by? How long did you work on it? 
In one of the production classes here at Berklee, my instructor, Susan Rogers told me all about the AES competition that was going to happen that year. Since I’m always running around and being mind busy as I often get, I didn’t really know about the student competition until she talked about it. However, before then, about a few months before, I had chosen the clip that I submitted (Star Wars) so I could work on it just for fun. When I learned Category 4 was all about audio for visuals, I put them together and things worked out. I worked on the clip for about two weeks very intensely, and I have to say I’m proud of it despite it being my very first submission. As what inspired me to do it, I would say who inspired me to do it, and that was my professor Susan Rogers.
 
Filipe in his home studio.
 
What was your most significant/funny/inspiring experience as an audio engineer? 
My most significant moment as an audio engineer would have to be the session with Terence Blanchard last fall. I was one of the student engineers of the weekly orchestral recording class. This class was by far one the best experiences I’ve had. One of the weeks in this class, we had professional composers come in and as a student, I’d record while they conducted a high-level student orchestra. I had to pinch myself at times. There I was, sitting behind a NEVE 88RS, in the best facility for orchestras in Boston, engineering an original composition by Terrence Blanchard while he conducted it... It was a good day.
 
Accidents happen: What was your biggest mistake in a production and what did you do to redeem the situation? 
My biggest mistake, and it only happened once, is when I got a beating from the NEVE in a full band session for a friend. This happened a while back but I remember feeling lost behind the console, I just didn’t understand it for a bit that night. It must have been the lack of sleep, but I was just dumbfounded during that session. I was assigned to record an R&B band and the problems just kept popping up out of nowhere. Thankfully, there was one of the studio support techs and he helped the session along. I learned my lesson there really well.
 
What’s your advice for engineers who are just starting out?
The most valuable advice I would give to an engineer that is just coming up would be that opportunities come along if you position yourself right.
 
Tech talk: What are your favourite pieces of equipment (microphones, outboard, plugins), and why? 
I’d say my top three tools that I enjoy working with are the API Legacy, Ableton Live (for sound design) and DPA, just to name a few.
The API Legacy for me is a no-nonsense board and I’ve come to be quite fond of it. This is the board that I started with and solidified my knowledge of audio in, so I constantly grasp at the chance to work on it.
As far as software, I’d say Ableton Live just fit what I do so well. It’s flexible and it almost seems suggestive of creativeness.  
In the area of microphones, I’m always reaching out to the DPAs in the mic cabinet. I use them at every session I do with a band. The 4011s and 4006s are reliable in the studio and certain recording contexts.
 
Can you name one or multiple of your favourite recordings or productions and tell us why you like them/what you like about them?
I’ve been listening to a lot of EDM lately and one artist “MADEON” is one that I am following. His first album “Adventure” just came out. The whole production of the album just feels right, especially because there was an expectation for the 1st album. They nailed it and the sounds and the melodies were so right.
 
What/who made you join the AES?
My professor Susan Rogers motivated me and my peers to join the AES and submit to the Student Competition. She does so much for us students and really believes in the AES, but first and foremost in us, the students.
 
What do you like about the AES? How does it help you to become a better and more successful audio engineer?
The AES has exposed me to important people of our field. Through the competition, I had the opportunity to receive priceless feedback on my work, and that is something I’ll never forget. Ever since I joined the audio engineering program at Berklee, I saw the camaraderie between the engineers and the feeling that we’re here to help each other out. I get this same feeling with the AES as well and this motivates me and helps me realize even further that there’s a place for me in this industry.
 
Tell us about your favourite experiences at the 139th AES Convention in New York!
My favorite experience was that I got to be closer to my fellow Berklee peers. Of course winning the gold metal was the highlight of the event, but I really felt that I made friends that I will always have for years to come.
 
What is your favourite frequency?
Lately 0 Hertz has been a favorite.
 
What do you do when you’re not in the studio or doing anything music related?
I’m with my family most of the time when I'm free, but I do make time to play soccer with friends and go to the gym. I try to stay physically active as much as I can, but I must say, a whole day at an orchestral mix can be a good workout.
 
Where do you see yourself in 10 years?
I see myself working in post production. I also see a possibility of a career in orchestral recording or score mixing. I enjoy working with composers and musicians on a scoring stage. I welcome the pressure that a film score session brings.
 
Could you provide us with some closing comments?
I think a whole lot can be said about talent, determination and skill but I cannot leave out the people that motivate and mentor a student coming up in life. I am fortunate to be in a school that believes in their students and truly wants us to succeed. I’m also fortunate to have had professors who sincerely commit to the wellness of their students. This shows me I have to go on and keep learning, because I’ll get a chance to help others someday.
 
We wish you all the best and we and expect big things from you! 


Posted: Monday, February 15, 2016

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AES139 Student Recording Competition Winner Interview: Jennifer Nulsen

Jennifer Nulsen's submission received a honourable mention in the first category (Traditional Acoustic Recording) at the Student Recording Competition of the 139th AES Convention. You can listen to her work here
 
 
Tell us a little bit about yourself. Where are you from? Where and what do you study? What audio field are you in?
I am currently located in West Hartford, CT, where I study at the Hartt School at the University of Hartford. I am a double major in music production and technology and piano performance, and will graduate with two B.M. degrees in May 2016. I work primarily in classical music recording, editing, and production, but I also work in video post production and jazz recording.
 
What initiated your passion for audio? When did it start?
My passion for audio is an outgrowth of my passion for music, which began at a very early age. Late in high school and early in my undergrad career, I began to relate my musical experiences to audio after working as a production assistant on a classical album release. Between this experience and some basic music technology courses, I found myself drawn to the union of art and science that audio work can be. For me, recording music is about creating the ideal performance of a piece or a song, using slightly different tools and skills than the musicians themselves. This challenge of learning a new skill set and a new way of listening to create an ideal performance intrigued me then and it has kept me intrigued ever since.
 
Are you a musician yourself? What instruments do you play and in what musical context?
I am a musician­. In fact, while studying audio, I’m also studying for a degree in piano performance. This has led to mostly classical performance situations as both a chamber musician and solo musician in the past few years, but I’ve also worked as a jazz pianist in trios, quartets, and big bands.
 
Tell us about the production of your submission. What is the story behind it? What was it inspired by? How long did you work on it? 
My submission was a concert recording for a professional woodwind quartet at the Tanglewood Music Center, and so the inspiration behind the recording was to capture the most accurate and enthralling performance possible while keeping the stage fairly clear for the performers and audience. The turnaround time for these concerts was fairly quick, so I only worked on the recording for about two days - a day after the concert, and another day before the competition to revisit the recording before submitting it.
 
Was it your first entry?
It wasn't - I entered last year at AES 137 in the same category, and received a Bronze Award for that entry.
 
What was your most significant/funny/inspiring experience as an audio engineer?
The most incredible experience I’ve had as an audio engineer to date was the opportunity to work as an assistant engineer on the Tanglewood Music Center Orchestra’s performance of Mahler’s Symphony No. 8 under Andris Nelsons. The soloists and orchestra were absolutely astounding, and the sheer volume of performers (over three hundred fifty) on stage provided a new level of challenge and a simply astonishing volume of sound. The performance was broadcast to radio and to a live stream in Boston (several tens of thousands of people total), so the pressure to know the music and the technical setup equally well was high, and I truly enjoyed getting to know both the music and technology even better through this experience. Working under great head engineers also made the experience educational, as they were incredibly open to explaining the setup and offering constructive criticism as the week of rehearsals and concert progressed.
 
Accidents happen: What was your biggest mistake in a production and what did you do to redeem the situation?
There are so many times where I’ve made a mistake in a production and had to learn to never repeat it through the process of remedying the situation, and I feel that this has really helped me to grow as a young engineer. However, a particularly tricky moment for me came in a concert recording of art songs and poem recitations. The first speaker walked out and I had forgotten to spike where he was standing on stage, so he ended up standing at a great distance from the microphones I had hoped to use to capture his voice. I had to go back and remix the whole recitation pretty extensively, and ever since then I’ve been very careful about solidifying stage positions with performers during the rehearsal process!
 
What’s your advice for engineers who are just starting out?
I feel like I’m just starting out myself, but so far, the best advice that I’ve received was to treat audio work like an instrument. Constant practice and new experiences, even if you end up being the coffee person, working for eighteen hours straight, or recording something you feel like you’d never record individually, are both important and irreplicable. I’ve learned so much just by showing up to assist on sessions and asking as many questions as seemed appropriate to the situation. Also, try as many new types of audio work as possible; for me, the best way to figure out what I wanted to focus on was by learning about what I didn’t enjoy and why I didn’t enjoy it.
 
Tech talk: What are your favourite pieces of equipment (microphones, outboard, plugins), and why?
Lately, I’ve been using the Millenia NSEQ­2 on almost every recording I’ve done, as a sort of master bus EQ, because I love the ability to toggle between the J­FET solid state and Class A vacuum tube circuits. This option has been an excellent finishing character touch on several recordings for me recently.
 
Can you name one or multiple of your favourite recordings or productions and tell us why you like them/what you like about them?
I really love the Goat Rodeo Sessions album by Yo­-Yo Ma, Edgar Meyer, Stuart Duncan, and Chris Thile. I think the balance between direct and ambient sound is incredible, and that the production draws the listener into the center of the group without distorting the sense of proportion and tonal balance of each instrument. This record is one of my go­to reference recordings whenever I’m trying to adjust to a new system or a new room simply because it is so honest and transparent in production style.
 
What/who made you join the AES?
I joined the AES shortly after I began my audio studies at the Hartt School, after my professor, Justin Kurtz, encouraged me to join to take advantage of the awesome opportunities at that year’s convention in New York and through networking year­round with the people I would meet that fall.
 
What do you like about the AES? How does it help you to become a better and more successful audio engineer?
I like the chances that AES provides to engineers to connect with both people in their own specialized disciplines, and with people outside of that realm. Beyond this, AES allows these groups of people to educate each other and together build a stronger base of knowledge and further advancement for the audio industry, utilizing the combined types of knowledge and individual strengths of uniquely talented audio engineers.
 
Tell us about your favourite experiences at the 139th AES Convention in New York!
I loved getting caught up with friends and colleagues that I rarely see outside of the conventions, and particularly enjoyed Saul Walker’s talk with Alex Case about his career and where he sees the audio industry going in the near future. I think that both Mr. Walker and Mr. Case are brilliant speakers and engineers, so listening to them discuss console and gear design in relation to the future of the industry was pretty incredible.
 
What is your favourite frequency?
If I had to listen to only one frequency for the foreseeable future, it would definitely be 250 Hz. I think it’s a very relaxing frequency, even if it can cause a lot of buildup trouble in production at times!
 
What do you do when you’re not in the studio or doing anything music related?
Usually when I get some down time, I end up relaxing at home with a good book or some Netflix.
 
Where do you see yourself in 10 years?
I’m not sure, but I hope to be working in classical audio production in some capacity full­time, with a graduate degree in audio engineering.
 
Could you provide us with some closing comments?
Thanks to the AES for this award! I’m looking forward to next year’s convention.
 
We look forward to seeing you there too! 

Jennifer's website


Posted: Monday, February 1, 2016

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