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AES Students

AES Student

On the Student pages you will find information collected and provided by student members of the AES who have been elected officers of the Student Delegate Assembly (SDA). Find out more about us here.

If you are an AES student member, this is the place where you can get informed about student related topics. Also, every student is invited to help keeping these pages a vivid and up to date resource by sending us interesting news and reports from your AES Student Section. 

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Student Recording Competition Finalist Interview - Bastian Striepke

1) Tell us a little about yourself. Where are you from and what do you study? 

My name is Bastian, I'm from Germany and I study Media Technology at the HAW Hamburg.

2) What initiated your passion for audio? When did it start?
 
For me, it was always there in some form. However, my passion for music really came through when my older brother gifted me his old acoustic guitar - I think I was 13 at the time. I played for 10 hours straight every day when I got it. Later, when I was around 16, he started studying audio engineering at the SAE institute for fun. Because of this, I discovered another passion for the engineering side of things. He used to take me to the studios, showed me around and played me his mixes. I quickly realized, that's what I wanted to do as well. So I bought some beginner audio equipment and started producing stuff in my bedroom. My love for audio only ever grew from there.
 
3) Tell us about production of your submission? What is the story behind it? What inspired it? How long did you work on it? Was it your first entry?
 
I mixed the song "melancholie" from the german Indie-Pop band "gleich da". It's an upbeat song about the ups and downs in life, looking back and reflecting on the hard times and then moving on from that. It uses water and tides as a metpahor for this concept, and so the entire song revolves around a wave-like structure, going up and down in intensity, with piano and organ sections flowing in and out - just like the rising tides. The production is centered around this element and I tried to complement the song structure by mixing it in a wave-like fashion aswell. We spend a good half year start-to-finish on this production. This is including a high amount of pre-poduction - visiting the band on live concerts and during practice-sessions, talking about lyrics, arrangements, instruments and making sure the song itself was in the right state to be recorded in the first place. For me it's very important to spend time with the musicians I want to record, get to know them, know how they work and to make sure that we have great song. After all - no amount of production can turn a bad song into a good one.
 
4) What/who made you join AES?
 
We have a very strong student section in Hamburg, Germany - with regular study trips, workshops, lectures and events. I wanted to be part of it, so I joined it pretty much immediately when I started studying there. Now I can help to shape the section as vice chair and hopefully attract new members the same way I was attratced back then.
 
5) Tell us about your favorite experiences at the 146th AES convention in Dublin!
 
The best experience of any AES convention is talking to all the amazing people, professionals and students attending the event and getting to know them. Forging these connections is incredibly valuable. But I also really enjoyed all the student offerings this year, which seemed particularly abundant. And the Heyser lecture, as always, was a real highlight aswell. 

 


Posted: Sunday, May 12, 2019

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Student Design Competition winner interview - Kamil Piotrowski

Student Design Competition winner interview - Kamil Piotrowski

     1) Tell us a little about yourself. Where are you from and what do you study?

 
 
I am from Poland. More precisely from Bydgoszcz but currently I live in Cracow - the city I have started studies almost 5 years ago. I am finishing master's degree in acoustic engineering now and thinking about nearest future.
 
    2) What initiated your passion for audio? When did it start? 
 
 
From a little child I always have been interested in music. With aging it turned into hobby and the things went on. Making a decision about field of studies there were no doubts what to choose. I can say that my passion was born then 
 
    3) Tell us about production of your submission? What is the story behind it? How long did you work on it? Was it your first entry? What kind of problem can it solve or improve?
 
 
The story is pretty simple. Realising how interesting ambsionics technique is, I started studying the topic and conducted first research. Of course they finished successfully and then I started developing my next ideas much more seriously. The result brought me to 146th AES where I presented my own measurement system regarding improving listening conditions in small rooms using Higher-Order Ambisonics. Measuring room impulse responses using III order ambisonic microphone and providing them to analysing tool, the software determines direction of arrival of early reflections that need to be attenuated. The base were recommendations EBU Tech. 3276-E and  ITU-R BS.775-3. Let's say it is a product of nearly half a year studies.
 
    4) Did you considered commercializing your project? Are there any business or product possibilities?
 
 
Actually, application of ambisonics in audio science is a really hot topic. I have met many people interested in my work and that led me to thoughts of commercialising the project. Range of possibilities is hugely wide. I am in contact with some people and next publications might be just a matter of time
 
 
    5) Do you know or consider any future steps? Will it be linked with the project you’ve presented?
 
 
As I mentioned above, there are many ways of developing my work. I have to carry out little brainstorm and then decide what to do next. Few ideas are waitng but, like always, the question is do they meet the needs of audio society. Anyway, I am sure it is going to be a combination of room acoustics and ambisonics.
 
 
    6) Tell us about your favourite experiences at the 146th AES convention in Dublin!
 
 
Of course the most lovely one is the moment I was awarded. Speaking about something less obvious, what positively hit me the most was a student society. A number of students participated in the conference, including many friends of mine, and I like it.  

 


Posted: Saturday, May 11, 2019

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Student Design Competition winner interview - Adam Szwajcowski

Student Design Competition winner interview - Adam Szwajcowski

 1) Tell us a little about yourself. Where are you from and what do you study?

 
 I'm from southern Poland, currently enjoying my last semester of MSc course of Acoustic Engineering at AGH University of Science and Technology in Kraków.
 
2) What initiated your passion for audio? When did it start? 
 
  I've always been interested in sounds, particularly the musical ones. Getting into acoustics and then audio engineering was a natural next step of my technical progress, combining passion for music and science.
 
3) Tell us about production of your submission? What is the story behind it? How long did you work on it? Was it your first entry? What kind of problem can it solve or improve?
 
My entry was an extension of a research I carried out some time ago on using spherical harmonics for directivity pattern representation. I was curious if going one dimension higher than commonly used 3D functions can be beneficial and so far it turned out to do so. I only did simple tests before AES and there is a ton more to develop in this direction, however I believe that the way of dircetivity representation I came out with can solve some problems of spatial resolution and computational complexity in stuff like geometric method room acoustics simulations or immersivity in VR.
 
4) Did you considered commercializing your project? Are there any business or product possibilities?
 
No, not really. I'd rather keep the algorithm open and let everyone benefit from it for the better good. It's rather hard to commercialize a thing like this anyway, I guess.
 
 


Posted: Friday, May 10, 2019

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AES - Audio Engineering Society