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AES Student

On the Student pages you will find information collected and provided by student members of the AES who have been elected officers of the Student Delegate Assembly (SDA). Find out more about us here.

If you are an AES student member, this is the place where you can get informed about student related topics. Also, every student is invited to help keeping these pages a vivid and up to date resource by sending us interesting news and reports from your AES Student Section. 

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MATLAB Plugin Competition Winner - Christian Steinmetz

Christian Steinmetz of Clemson University

Christian Steinmetz of Clemson University

 

  1. Tell us a little about yourself. Where are you from and what do you study?

    I am originally from South Carolina in the US where I studied Electrical Engineering and Audio Technology during my undergrad at Clemson University. Currently I am a master’s student at Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona studying Sound and Music Computing within the Music Technology Group (MTG). 

 

  1. What initiated your passion for audio? When did it start?

    My interest in audio came out of my interest first as a music listener. Early on I became involved in building speaker enclosures, demoing different headphones, and experimenting with amplifiers to try and build a better sounding listening system. Eventually, this lead me into the world of music production and audio engineering because I was interested in making recordings that sounded the way I wanted. Throughout high school and my undergrad, I have worked as a recording, mixing, and mastering engineer. At the same time I have been focused on applying engineering in the construction of tools that advance the field of audio engineering, aiming to develop tools that assist in and extend the workflow of audio engineers. I am continuing this line of research in my thesis here at the MTG, with the application of deep learning to tasks in music signal processing.   

 

  1. Tell us about the production of your submission. What is the story behind it? What inspired it? How long did you work on it? Was it your first entry?

    My project, flowEQ, aims to provide a simplified interface to the classic five-band parametric equalizer. In order to effectively utilize the parametric EQ, an audio engineer must have an intimate understanding of the gain, center frequency, and Q controls, as well as how multiple bands can be used in tandem to achieve a desired timbral adjustment. For the ametuar audio engineer or musician this often presents too much complexity, and flowEQ aims to solve this problem by providing an intelligent interface geared towards these kinds of users. By applying some of the latest techniques in machine learning, like the disentangled variational autoencoder (β-VAE), we can utilize data of equalizer settings collected from audio engineers (via the SAFE-DB) to learn a well structured, low dimensional representation of the parameter space of the EQ. This low dimensional space then allows the user to control all thirteen knobs of the equalizer with only two controls, for example. For the inexperienced user this presents a powerful way to search across possible EQ configurations, where they can use their ears to find the desired effect, using knowledge aggregated from trained audio engineers. If you are interested in learning more about how all of this works check out the project webpage (https://flowEQ.ml) where I go into all of the nitty-gritty details. This was not my first entry at AES. Last year I presented my reverb plugin, NeuralReverberator, in the MATLAB plugin competition, and the year before that I presented a phase analysis plugin that aims to help audio engineers improve microphone placement for better drum recordings. 

 

  1. What/Who made you join AES?

    I first learned of the AES through my audio technology professor at Clemson. After discovering the journal and diving into all of the interesting research being published, I decided to join. Shortly after learning about the yearly convention held in NYC, I set a goal for myself to find a way to attend. I came up with a project idea and built a plugin to present during the Student Design Competition. After sharing it with my professor, I was able to receive funding from my department to travel to the convention. Attending the AES convention for the first time in 2017 was one of the major moments in my development as a researcher, and solidified my interest in continuing my research in this field. 

 

  1. Tell us about your favorite experiences at the 147th AES Convention in New York!

    My favorite part of the convention was getting to present and share my project with other people interested in audio engineering. Getting to meet new people with the same interests and their own unique perspectives is, for me, one of the highlights of a convention like AES. In addition, I enjoyed attending many of talks and paper sessions where I got to hear from some of the most influential researchers in the audio community.

 

To learn more about flowEQ


Posted: Wednesday, February 19, 2020

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Student Recording Competition Winner - Jared Richardson

Student Recording Competition Winner - Jared Richardson

 

  1. Tell us a little about yourself. Where are you from and what do you study?

    I'm Jared Richardson, from Provo Utah. I recently graduated with a Bachelor's in Media Arts from Brigham Young University, and my goal is to work in post-production sound for film and animation.

 

  1. What initiated your passion for audio? When did it start?

    My passion for audio came partially from my little siblings. In 2014, when I was on a 2-year mission in Chicago for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, I rarely got to talk to my family back home, so my little brother and sister would send me emails with attached audio recordings. They were essentially podcasts, but they always went the extra mile and included background music, fun segments, and little fictional skits. These really inspired me, and ever since I got home I've wanted to participate in all sorts of audio-related creative projects with sound effects, voice over, and mixing.

 

  1. Tell us about the production of your submission. What is the story behind it? What inspired it? How long did you work on it? Was it your first entry?

    This was my first time entering the Student Recording Competition at AES on a recommendation from my professor. The submission was an animated short film, Grendel, produced by BYU's animation program. Typically students don't do the sound for BYU's animated shorts, but I persuaded the faculty to let me do it, and I'm so glad I did! Production was long (several months) and pretty monotonous at times, but I enjoyed all of it. Between voice over work, Foley, sound design, overall mixing, and many meetings with the director and composer for the film, we eventually reached a place we were happy with. It's a lovely film, and I hope people who watch it feel that the sound does the quality animation justice. I am absolutely honored to have received a Silver Award for it.

 

  1. What/Who made you join AES?

    I attended and joined AES because of my professor, Aaron Merrill. He was the one who gave me feedback on the film, and felt like I should submit it as an applicant. Without him, none of this would have been possible.

 

  1. Tell us about your favorite experiences at the 147th AES Convention in New York!

    The convention was really fun! I'm not used to big cities, but being around industry professionals and those who are excited about audio and music was an exceptional experience. It felt like there was something for everyone, both on the showfloor and in the many classes/panel discussions. I would love to attend again someday in the future!

 


Posted: Wednesday, January 8, 2020

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Student Design Competition Winner Interview - Matthew Cheshire

 1) Tell us a little about yourself. Where are you from and what do you study?

 
My name is Matthew. Im originally from a quiet little village in Hertfordshire UK. Upon finishing school I studied Music Technology at a local college before moving to Birmingham UK to study Sound Engineering and Production at Birmingham City University. Since Graduating I’ve stayed at the uni to work on a PhD in the Digital Media Technology (DMT) lab. 
 
2) What initiated your passion for audio? When did it start?
 
My Dad had a really big record collection and I would always listen to his vinyls from the 60’s and 70’s at a young age, around this time I started recording weird sounds and noises on a budget cassette recorder and then progressed to the DAW in my teens. 
 
3) Tell us about production of your submission? What is the story behind it? How long did you work on it? Was it your first entry? What kind of problem can it solve or improve?
 
My submission was born out of necessity, I needed a way to accurately and repeatedly strike a drum, in a way that would remove human variation, this was for use in a microphone comparison study that I was writing for the AES. I decided to build a Robotic Drum Arm (RDA) to produce more accurate data for my study. The RDA was controlled by MIDI messages from the DAW via an Arduino UNO, The development and testing methodology of the RDA become the main focus for my Student Design Competition submission. This was my first entry in to the competition, the total project took a few months to develop as there was a lot of trial and error involved. 
 
4) Did you consider commercializing your project? Are there any business or product possibilities?
 
The project was very much in the prototype stage and was developed to address one very specific problem, for this to be developed into a commercial product a lot more work would be needed and improvements made to it, at this time I do not intend to commercialize it.
 
5) Do you know or consider any future steps? Will it be linked with the project you’ve presented?
 
One of the biggest limitations of the RDA, was that that it could only strike the drum at one velocity level this was appropriate for what I needed it for at the time, but developing it future I would like to have programable velocity variation that would be mappable to 127 MIDI values. 
 
6) Tell us about your favorite experiences at the 147th AES convention in New York!
 
Being at the 147th AES convention was a great experiences, I was able to share and discuss my work with other like minded people, whilst at the same time learning so much from all the informative talks and presentation that were taking place throughout the week. The highlight for me was being one of the winnings of the Saul Walker student design competition.
 


Posted: Thursday, January 2, 2020

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