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AES Student Blog

AES143 Student Recording Competition Interview: Loren Dorland

AES143 Student Recording Competition Interview: Loren Dorland

1) Tell us a little about yourself. Where are you from and what do you study?

I was born and raised near Tulsa, Oklahoma. I moved to Boston to attend Berklee College of Music and join their Music Production and Engineering major. It had been my dream to attend Berklee since I was 13 and getting to be a part of such a musically rich culture was more than a dream-come-true.

I’ve been so lucky to study under some of the most talented audio engineers in the industry and learn from them first-hand. Having my engineering projects graded by Susan Rogers is nerve-wracking, to say the least, but it lead me to set strong foundations as an audio engineer.

At Berklee I was able to work on dozens of different projects, ranging from folky string quartets to 12 piece funk bands. Being around such incredible musicians who are so dedicated to their art meant I was never at a loss when looking for new material to record. 

Now I’m a freelancer in Boston. I work for Berklee’s Internet Radio Station (The BIRN) and assist engineers and studios around the city, such as Dan Cantor at Notable Productions and Robin Moore at WGBH. Since I graduated I’ve found that the learning never really stops and I’m eager to work hands-on with seasoned professionals in the audio industry!

2) What initiated your passion for audio? When did it start?

My father is a music enthusiast and his library spanned decades, from jazz to early rock and roll to 80s disco, he loved collecting music. We would have contests on who could find the coolest new artist on the charts. I spent my childhood making playlists with him on CDs and sharing them with our family and friends. Every activity was embellished by the smooth tones of Motown or folk hits of the 70s.

I started writing music at a very young age and was always eager to share my songs. My parents bought me a guitar, I taught myself how to accompany my voice and by the time I was 13 my mother had me in the studio working through my songs with producer Jung Song from Tulsa. During this time, I became fascinated with recording. I found myself envious of the job behind the glass and asked a million questions to gain insight on exactly what the job of “engineer” and “producer” entailed.

I was lucky enough to attend a program at a local technical college during high school for music production. It was there that I finally got my hands on a microphone, learned how to mic a drum set and got certified in ProTools. This lead to my acceptance into Berklee and my journey through the Music Production and Engineering major there.I don’t think I could ever give up the feeling of anticipation when walking into a studio before set-up and preparing for music to be created. I’ve never felt more at home than when I’m behind that glass. I am honored to be an active part in bringing artist’s music to “tape” and enabling them to share it with the world. 

3) Tell us about production of your submission? What is the story behind it? What inspired it? How long did you work on it? Was it your first entry?

Brandon Hassan is not only one of my favorite clients, but a dear friend of mine. His music is volatile and passionate and working with him in the studio never fails to excite. I submitted to two categories at AES, Traditional and Modern studio recording, with two of my productions with Brandon. Both productions probably accumulated 40+ hours each if you include every recording session and mix sessions. Because Berklee only give 2-hour studio slots, everything had to be pieced together bit-by-bit. The songs are a part of Brandon’s band SHAH, who are all incredibly talented and enjoyable people. It was a blast!

These were my first entries into the AES competition and they both won awards! It was my last shot for submitting my work before I graduated and I’m super thankful that I did.

4) What/who made you join AES?

My second year at Berklee I went to an AES convention in New York. Dan Cantor at Notable, who also was a professor of mine, convinced me to go. I was completely enamored the whole weekend with the gear, the talks, and the people I met! Everyone is so kind and it’s so fun to be in a huge group of people who are all there for the same reason: to nerd out over audio. AES has always been a no-brainer. I want to be a part of the audio engineering community and joining was the first logical step.

5) Tell us about your favourite experiences at the 143st AES convention in NY!

Well, seeing Andrew Scheps mix Iggy Pop was incredible, along with all the other great minds at the Mix With the Masters booth. It’s cool to hear the pros talking about the mindset to have during the process, as opposed to worrying about technical stuff (which you can always learn). There was such a wide range of experience there. Getting to talk with professionals at booths and get ideas for the steps I should take in my career in the future was an invaluable experience.

 

 


Posted: Monday, February 5, 2018

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AES143 Student Recording Competition Interview: Kerrick Michael Crace

AES143 Student Recording Competition Interview: Kerrick Michael Crace

1) Tell us a little about yourself. Where are you from and what do you study?

I'm originally from Kennesaw (suburb of Atlanta), but I've lived in Nashville for 7 years now and it's my home. I recently graduated from Belmont University with a self oriented focus on score composition and film audio, and formally I graduated with a B.S. degree in Audio Engineering Technology with a minor in Music Business.

2) What initiated your passion for audio? When did it start?

I've grown up playing and composing on piano since I was 4 years old, though I never really learned to read music past a basic level. My piano teacher, after my stubborness wouldn't cease, fostered ear training and I learned to play fully by ear by the age of 8 or so. From there I learned to play other instruments - guitars, bass, drums, a little trumpet and viola, and I developed an ear for how instruments sound and fit together. Recorded bands throughout high school with a super simple Zoom 16 multitrack and maybe 3 mics. From that point on my perfectionist mind was always fascinated with sound and making things sound better and better. I realized in 2014 that I wasn't meant to record bands all my life (though I still will on the side), but I realized with my passion for audio and composition - and after having an incredible emotional reaction to seeing Interstellar in IMAX - that I had to fight to become a film score composer. Since then, I have trained myself to score films and have been lucky enough to work on over 2 dozen short films and bigger ones are in the works right now! Scoring really is the one things I feel that I can do in this world to impact people and to help creators share their story or to enhance a vision. This is everything to me, it is purpose.

3) Tell us about production of your submission? What is the story behind it? What inspired it? How long did you work on it? Was it your first entry?

This was my second entry! Last year I won a Bronze for a project under a similar situation, so I was really exciting and relieved to know I not only placed this time as well, but I did better than last year which feels great! So for this project I was hired to both create an original score and fully mix/master and do all the postproduction audio. The film was a successful graduate thesis project for Emerson College M.F.A. student Logan Freeman. I began the project in January of 2017 and completed both the score and the final mix in April of 2017. Upon deciding to submit, I created a 2.1 version and performed a remix to enhance and tighten things. The film, "Fated to Repeat," covers the struggle of an Alabama grunge rock band attempting to recover after losing one of their members in a tragic accident. My submission took place towards the middle of the 20min film and followed Mia, the band's now lead singer, who has gone outside the music venue to find the father of their deceased lead singer, Evan. The clip begins with Evan's father abruptly driving away when he sees Mia, which triggers Mia into a dream state where she recalls her past experiences with Evan and the band.

4) What/who made you join AES?

I went to a local Nashville AES when I was a freshman or sophomore I believe, and I joined our Belmont chapter then. I became the Treasurer for my junior year and then the Chair for my senior year.

5) Tell us about your favourite experiences at the 143st AES convention in NY!

Two of my fellow Belmont friends who are in the Audio masters program were able to present their research at AES and it was exciting to see that! I loved the seminars on film audio - they will keep me coming back every year for sure. Honestly I also just enjoyed New York as it was my first time being there, and getting to spend it with friends, celebrating the Recording Compeition results was incredible. Also getting to be in the room with SO many incredible engineers and creators is priceless and gives me a boost of energy that I hope will last me until next time!

 

To listen to Kerrick's project click here:


Posted: Friday, January 26, 2018

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AES143 Student Recording Competition Interview: Julián David Rincón Ruiz

AES143 Student Recording Competition Interview: Julián David Rincón Ruiz

1) Tell us a little about yourself. Where are you from and what do you study?

My name is Julián David Rincón Ruiz. I studied at the University of San Buenaventura in Bogotá, Colombia.

2) What initiated your passion for audio? When did it start?

My passion for audio was born from the need to save the sounds that I generated with my electric guitar, as a result of this, I started reading about audio and I realized the great amount of interesting things that the audio world offered, it was about 13 years ago.

3) Tell us about production of your submission? What is the story behind it? What inspired it? How long did you work on it? Was it your first entry?

I always try to record musical genres that are not very common. I do this, because I think that each genre has interesting things to contribute and challenges to solve when I record. Some time ago I wanted to record something that had instruments like: charango, violins and flutes. Initially I contacted a friend of mine who makes music for movies but unfortunately he had to move out of town, so I decided to search the internet for some musical groups of genres that had some of these instruments, searching, I found "Tierra Fertil" a group of Andean music and I decided to contact them to record a session in block. We were approximately 2 months adjusting schedules and dates and I was listening to many songs of that genre to study their sonority and thus be able to choose the indicated microphones so that the recording would sound as organic as possible; the day of the recording, we spent about 8 hours in the studio and recorded 4 songs in block. I decided to choose the song "Sol del Sur" because it was the song that most conveyed emotions. I think that although the recording process is very important. Finally in my opinion when we create music we generate emotions.

4) What/who made you join AES?

Last year, by suggestion of a university professor, I decided to join the AES to participate in the student competition of the 141st convention that was to be held in Los Angeles. I signed up with my degree project partner and I participated with the project "Design and construction of a control system for audio editors with integrated communication management" with which we got the gold award. Considering the great support and incentives from the AES, this year I decided to participate in the section of traditional recording in studio.

5) Tell us about your favourite experiences at the 143st AES convention in NY!

The 143rd convention was incredible because I had the opportunity to meet incredible people and excellent engineers, besides being able to see the latest in audio technology and to visit amazing studios in NY.

To listen to Julián's project click here:


Posted: Thursday, January 18, 2018

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AES143 Student Design Competition Interview: Emre Kanatli

1) Tell us a little about yourself. Where are you from and what do you study?

I grew up in Istanbul and came to the USA four years ago to pursue my studies. I am a last-year undergraduate student in New York University, double majoring in Music Technology and Computer Science. I am very interested in technology and its applications, especially artificial intelligence. Although music on the other hand is the spirit and soul. Therefor I'm trying to find a healthy balance between the two.

2) What initiated your passion for audio? When did it start?

My passion for audio came from my passion towards music. At the age of 10 I started to develop my musical taste, until then I would listen to whatever was given. Initially I was very interested in rap, rock and punk, didn't really listened to the electronic music of the time. Not much later I wanted get more involved in music and picked up my first instrument, which was my father's classical guitar. I met most of my closest friends through my interest to make and listen to music. We would spend hours just listening and talking about records. My interest in electronic music began when I discovered the legendary Ghent based group Soulwax. What they did blew my mind because I had no idea how such songs were possible to perform. This curiosity led me to discover other great artists, and sparked my interest in the technology behind all of this.

3) Tell us about production of your submission? What is the story behind it? What inspired it? How long did you work on it? Was it your first entry?

About two years ago I took a graduate course titled Music for the Web, which introduced the basic concepts behind how audio works on the web. We were supposed to do a final project for this class and I chose to do a very simple application where a user can play and manipulate loops. This was a very primal version of my submission to the AES competition. After spending some thought on the project I realized that with additional features, this can actually turn into a product that others would want to use. The main inspiration behind this project is concerned with how we consume music today. I feel like everything is planned or recorded beforehand, let it be shows or music we listen to. I've been making music for many years now and I rarely record what I play, it's mostly about jamming in the moment. I realized that these jams not always get recorded and not a lot of people get to hear them. What I try to accomplish with this project is to encourage people to take a step away from composing and simply play what they feel at the moment with all its impurity and spontaneity. The project took about a year and a half to get to its current state, with a lot of mistakes made along the way. Even though I work day and night to evolve this project to what I had dreamt of, if it wasn't for other responsibilities I have such as school I'm sure it would not have taken more than a few months to get to this stage. This was my first ever AES convention and my first entry to the competition, I'm glad it became a memorable first experience.

4) What/who made you join AES? 

The associate director of the music technology program, who is also an AES fellow, our lovely Agnieszka Roginska emailed me about the competition encouraging me to apply with my project which I have previously demonstrated in school. I felt like I had to join since it was in New York and I had a well made product under my hands, it was a good opportunity at the right time.

5) Tell us about your favourite experiences at the 143st AES convention in NY! 

My favorite experience was having the chance of showcasing my project to a variety of professionals in the industry from all around the world and hearing their opinions on it. Most of the feedback I received was positive and it certainly motivated me to go further with this project. 


Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018

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AES143 Student Recording Competition Interview: Noah Kowalski

 1) Tell us a little about yourself. Where are you from and what do you study?

I am from Portsmouth NH, and I went to school at Emerson College studying Audio Post Production/Sound Design for Visual Media Arts. At school I worked on audio post-production for student films with the occasional foray into production recording. Additionally I explored music editing for a dance organization on campus and podcast editing for EdTech Times in Boston, so I really tried to explore all sorts of audio while at school - except for music production. There was very little at my school offered for music production, which I think is a shame, but Emerson is not a music school so I guess it makes sense. Regardless of this, in my time at Emerson I was able to focus my time on post-production and learn from some really knowledgeable professors and I am grateful for all of the experiences I had there.

2) What initiated your passion for audio? When did it start? 

My passion for audio began in High School when I started playing with synthesizers and experimenting with effects units. At this point I had really just dipped my toes into recording. It was all so daunting and I kind of just jumped into it and taught myself subtractive synthesis on a Roland SH-201 keyboard that my dad had given me. I was always interested in music during school and I was unquestionably a band geek but I didn’t want to pursue performance as a career so audio felt like a natural alternative. It wasn’t until I arrived at Emerson that I became interested in sound for film, but I really enjoyed it and that is how I came to be where I am now.

3) Tell us about production of your submission? What is the story behind it? What inspired it? How long did you work on it? Was it your first entry?

My AES submission was a product of my final semester in which I had already taken every audio related class at Emerson. Unfortunately there was no real capstone project in my program, so I decided to create my own audio capstone. I always loved the show Avatar: The Last Airbender, and it seemed like the style of sound design would be both challenging but also achievable and so that was my pick for a sound replacement. Deciding to do an entire episode was biting off far more than I could chew at the time, but I just had to chip away and learn as I went. I spent roughly 400 hours on it in total and it really was the only thing I worked on all semester. It was my first AES submission and so I was quite proud to have been a finalist.

4) What/who made you join AES?

I had joined AES the year previous when I had heard my friends discussing going to AES 139. At the time I had never even heard of AES, but we all decided to go and check it out. It was honestly overwhelming at the time because there was so much to see, and I did not get nearly as much out of it as I did this time at AES 143. I was glad to be back again with a better sense of the convention!

5) Tell us about your favourite experiences at the 143st AES convention in NY!

My favorite experiences at AES 143 were the all of the conversations had between other people just like myself who are trying to get into this industry. I met so many amazing people who are doing amazing things, and I made a lot of friends that I know I will stay in touch with. In addition, meeting so many experienced minds within the industry and having the opportunity to have some of them critique my work was really an honor.


Posted: Monday, January 8, 2018

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AES143 Student Recording Competition Interview: Samuel Ramirez

AES143 Student Recording Competition Interview: Samuel Ramirez

1) Tell us a little about yourself. Where are you from and what do you study?

 
I'm from Elk Grove, California, but spent most of the ol' teen years growing up in Denton, Texas. I'm a junior in the audio engineering program at the Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University, with a concentration in music performance. I love the engineering and mixing side of music, but I also stay pretty active as a keyboard player and producer. I think being involved in music-making in different roles helps inform all the other roles! I'm incredibly thankful to have the opportunity to study here at Jacobs, where I've been able to learn from our immensely knowledgeable audio faculty, as well as mess around with, you know, a few decent mics. 
 
2) What initiated your passion for audio? When did it start? 
 
I remember as a kid I used to carpool to piano lessons with my older brother and our friend. While we were waiting at the teacher's house for our turn, she would let us mess around with loops in Garageband on her desktop computer. I remember making some wacky, long, and probably god-awful arrangements using the built-in loop library. Then sometime around middle school, my brother got a little 2-channel M-Audio interface, and I began making actual recordings. Eventually I figured out how to overdub tracks, and I guess I've been doing that ever since. 
 
3) Tell us about production of your submission? What is the story behind it? What inspired it? How long did you work on it? Was it your first entry?
 
Moose Memories is a local Bloomington band (which I may or may not be in), and we recorded this session with help from our friend Jared O'Brien late at night during finals week last year. We had played the song at a few shows by that point, and just wanted to get a quick and dirty recorded version to have as a demo. Everything was tracked live, except for overdubbed vocals. We ended up not touching it for months, but I began work on the mix a few weeks before the submission deadline for the AES mix competition so it made sense to go ahead and submit it. I had a lot of fun trying to balance cleanness and clarity in the mix with the rough, distorted aesthetic we were looking for. This was my first time submitting in the mix competition and I'm glad I did!
 
4) What/who made you join AES?
 
Recommendations from faculty and other students, and of course being able to participate in the convention itself.
 
5) Tell us about your favourite experiences at the 143st AES convention in NY!
 
Stevie Wonder is one of my all time favorite musicians and songwriters, so it was really wild to see him strolling by, even though I was fanboying out way too much to try to talk to him. I also learned a lot from the judges' feedback on all the mix competition submissions, which was awesome. 


Posted: Tuesday, January 2, 2018

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AES143 Student Recording Competition Interview: Fryderyk Hoang Dong

AES143 Student Recording Competition Interview: Fryderyk Hoang Dong
1) Tell us a little about yourself. Where are you from and what do you study?
 
I study at Frederic Chopin University of Music in Warsaw, Poland and currently I am doing a final year of Master's degree out there. I major in music recording and production but sound design for visual media has always been my passion that I wanted to keep working on. 
 
2) What initiated your passion for audio? When did it start? 
 
I think my music background is a complete basis for my interest in audio. I have been playing piano since I was 6 years old and actually did a Bachelor degree in Classical Piano Performance at the same time with Sound Engineering. These two are equally important in my life, but piano came first. During my high school years I decided I wanted to expand my horizons and knowledge and that's how I decided on going into audio field professionally.  
 
3) Tell us about production of your submission? What is the story behind it? What inspired it? How long did you work on it? Was it your first entry?
 
The video for the piece I submitted is originally a music video for a song by electronic artist Flying Lotus called "Tiny Tortures", of whom I am a big fan. I have seen great potential in it in terms of telling a story with sound design which didn't exist in original music. I decided to work on it and entirely created a new sonic layer. My main objective was to focus on emotional side and help the storytelling of a great picture directed by David Lewandowski. It was my first AES student competition entry.
 
4) What/who made you join AES?
 
AES is a very good networking resource, especially for young professionals who are just starting out in the field. 
 
5) Tell us about your favourite experiences at the 143st AES convention in NY!
 
Student Party was a pleasant experience which happened I think in a studio somewhere in Hell's Kitchen if I remember well. I saw a very weird looking grand piano and then realized the day after that it was the Alicia Keys' famous Piano sampled also by Native instruments. I saw it live and got to play on it for a bit, but didn't even realize that it was Alicia Keys' piano. Wow!


Posted: Sunday, December 31, 2017

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AES UK section are hosting UP Your Output!

Our colleagues at Audio Engineering Society British Section are organising a great conference and they are inviting all current AES Student and Recent Graduate Members. 

Once again, AES UK section are hosting UP Your Output! - the AES UK student conference, running March 17th/18th 2018 at Leeds Beckett University. This year's conference includes a great range of keynotes, loads of practical workshops and trade exhibits/tech demos from a range of top companies. They also have a student poster competition where students can present their project work in the format of an academic poster.

More Information


Posted: Tuesday, December 19, 2017

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AES 143 | Thank You Sponsors! Telefunken

AES 143 | Thank You Sponsors! Telefunken

TELEFUNKEN Elektroakustik strives for absolute perfection. By offering historic recreations of classic microphones alongside our own proprietary designs based around the distinctive tube mic sound, we have established a product line that perfectly blends vintage style and sound with the reliability of a modern-day microphone. Our commitment to both the sonic excellence and quality of all of our products is rivaled only by our dedication to provide the BEST possible service to each and every one of our customers.


Posted: Monday, December 18, 2017

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AES 143 | Thank You Sponsors! Solid State Logic

AES 143 | Thank You Sponsors! Solid State Logic

From groundbreaking audio consoles to innovative video production systems, Solid State Logic has evolved to become the world’s leading manufacturer of analogue and digital audio consoles and provider of creative tools for film, audio, video and broadcast professionals.

With more than 3000 SSL-equipped studios and facilities operational today, the excellence of SSL consoles is universally recognized for unrivaled sonic quality, superb ergonomics, outstanding automation and an international support infrastructure second to none.

Founded by Colin Sanders in 1969, SSL has since expanded to its present 15 acre science park in Oxfordshire, England. SSL's unrivalled resources, including R&D, manufacturing, training, service and product support, operate in a unique high technology, customer oriented environment.  The company invents, designs and manufactures technology for the creative manipulation of sound. Users and industry experts from all over the world visit SSL's Oxford HQ to consult with SSL audio experts and evaluate SSL equipment. There are more than 3000 SSL systems in service around the world.


Posted: Friday, December 15, 2017

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