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AES Student Blog

AES 141 Meet the Sponsors Big Bear Audio

Thank you to Big Bear Audio for sponsoring the recording competition.

 

Big Bear Audio is a high end audio design house based in London, founded by AES UK Vice Chairman Charlie Slee. Focusing on both pro and consumer audio products, Big Bear Audio designs and manufactures analogue electronics tools for the professional and audiophile.

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Posted: Tuesday, August 30, 2016

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AES 141 Meet the Sponsors! UVI

AES 141 Meet the Sponsors! UVI

UVI is a Paris, France-based developer of premium virtual instruments, effects and software for professional audio production. Over the past two decades UVI has released an extensive catalo of instruments and applications, winning numerous industry awards and accolades. As a key technology partner UVI has worked with many companies to enable groundbreaking software instruments with the renowned UVI EngineTM. 

Spanning over 40 releases ranging from mobile to desktop, UVI products are used by many of today’s top composers, producers, sound designers and musicians, being heard on numerous hit-records, film and TV scores and games. UVI products are crafted to deliver the finest experience possible—offering a wealth of unique and inspiring instruments, the highest quality sound, innovative features, efficient and reliable performance and world-class user interfaces.

Leveraging a deep technology portfolio, extensive experience and a passion for sound, UVI continues to push forward creating new and imaginative tools that both enable and inspire.

http://www.uvi.net/ 


Posted: Monday, August 29, 2016

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AES 141 Student Recording Competition Deadline Extended!

AES 141 Student Recording Competition Deadline Extended!

We are extending the Student Recording Competition deadline to one week from today Sunday September 4th! Go to http://www.aes.org/students/awards/recording/ for more information and to submit!


Posted: Sunday, August 28, 2016

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AES 141 Meet the Sponsors! Genelec

AES 141 Meet the Sponsors! Genelec

Like many other audio technology companies, Genelec’s roots are deeply seeded in the world of Broadcast. In 1976 YLE, the Finnish Broadcasting Company was building a new radio house in Pasila, Helsinki. Mr. Juhani Borenius asked his friends Ilpo Martikainen and Topi Partanen if they could build an active speaker. The first sample was produced two weeks later and within 2 years Genelec OY was founded and the S30, the first active speaker, was ready for market. Our current offering is the most complete in the market place: from the very compact 8010 to the massive 1036AWith leading technologies like Directivity Control Waveguide™, or DCW™ technology and Smart Active Monitor systems Genelec stays at the forefront of speaker technology and is proud to serve many of the worlds finest audio facilities.


Posted: Saturday, August 27, 2016

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AES140 Student Recording Competition Interview: Made Indrayana

AES140 Student Recording Competition Interview: Made Indrayana

Tell us a little bit about yourself. Where are you from? Where and what do you study?

 

I’m Indra, I come from Bali, Indonesia, but now currently studying my Master’s Degree in Time Dependent Media — Sound/Vision at HAW Hamburg (University of Applied Sciences Hamburg).

 

What initiated your passion for audio? When did it start?

 

It started quite early when I still watched Japanese cartoons. I was totally in love with the soundtracks but at that time there wasn’t Internet available and I didn’t have access to the original recordings. So instead, I hooked up the RCA audio out connector from my TV to my family’s old cassette deck and started recording the intro/outro songs from those cartoons. That was technically my first recording in my life. Soon enough there was internet, Cool Edit, and I was totally trying the FFT Filters and stuff. Cool period in my life!

 

Tell us about the production of your submission. What is the story behind it? What was it inspired by? How long did you work on it? Was it your first entry?

 

It was quite interesting actually, because for this submission I didn’t plan it to be a submission, because it came up first from my professor. He said, “I got a big band album recording coming up, who wants to be in charge?” and I realized that was my chance. Five days of recording, months of editing and mixing, and in the middle of it my professor said it could actually be a good submission for the AES Student Recording Competition! And yes, that was my first entry.

 

What was your most significant/funny/inspiring experience as an audio engineer? 

 

I think recording this submission was. It was the first time in my life recording 18 musicians live in a studio with 26 track coming in, and it should be perfect sounding. That was a hell lot of stress, but I also learned a lot in this production, microphone techniques is very important and very crucial when you start putting 15 musicians in the same room and getting a lot of bleed. But in the end, it was a joy mixing it because it already sounded so good and all the hard work was paid off!

 

What was your biggest mistake in a production and what did you do to redeem the situation?

 

I was a n00b back then recording drums, and I did lots of mistakes recording it on my bachelor’s end thesis. It sounded so poor with phasing everywhere, and I was so not pleased with it when I tried to mix it a few weeks later, but I did realize that it was too late too fix and I couldn’t do the recording again because of time factor. In the end I tried to fix it in the mix, ended up making the drums sounding “usable” but very thin and shallow sounding. I can safely say that it was not rescued and it is “printed” forever in my first album.

 

What’s your advice for engineers who are just starting out?

 

Firstly, microphone is your eq. Don’t record if you’re not satisfied with what you hear and do not hesitate to make hundreds of small changes. I promise, it’s worth it! Secondly, mix with your stock DAW plugins. If you can do it well, so you can with paid and shiny plugins. Last but not least, it’s not Pro Tools or Nuendo or whatever defines your mix, it’s you. DAWs are just helper tools to achieve your goals. Look again on advice number two :)

 

What are your favorite pieces of equipment (microphones, outboard, plugins), and why?

 

I totally love the Neumann TLM 103. One of the quietest mics on earth, and sounds so beautiful. I don’t have any fave outboards because I don’t work a lot with it, but my fave plug-in is the DMG Equilibrium. One of the heavenliest EQ that I’ve ever heard in the digital domain.

 

What/who made you join the AES? 

 

My professor Thomas Görne and his AES Student Section Hamburg!

 

Tell us about your favourite experiences at the 140th AES Convention in Paris!

 

Getting to volunteer as TPVR team with the amazing people from France, getting to know Michael and Sue Williams, and Glenn Lorbecki personally, and of course winning the silver award on the AES Student Recording Competition!

 

What is your favourite frequency?

 

2,5 kHz and neighboring frequencies, the frequency area that our ears are most sensitive to.

 

What do you do when you’re not in the studio or doing anything music related?

 

I think I would be working/owning a specialty coffee shops, roasting and serving our own coffees and make the best coffee in the world! ;-)

 

Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

 

I’d see myself as a professional in the Sound Design/Engineering world, working on a lot of projects but at the same time teaching in my Uni in Indonesia to help Indonesia develop this area of expertise and helping them to compete in the big bad world.

 

Could you provide us with some closing comments?

 

I think AES is a really amazing community of sound experts to connect people to the bigger world and also learn a lot from the experts. The "big guns” who I normally only see in the internet were totally friendly and helpful, and not arrogant or unfriendly as I imagined before. Kudos to AES and AES Student Sections for always organizing the awesome Conventions! Special thanks to Michael and Sue Williams for the chance of volunteering, the juries of AES Student Recording Competition Category 2, Glenn Lorbecki, Prof. Thomas Görne from HAW Hamburg, and the HAW Hamburg Tonlabor.


Posted: Friday, August 26, 2016

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AES 141 Meet the Sponsors! Women's Audio Mission

AES 141 Meet the Sponsors! Women's Audio Mission

Women's Audio Mission is a San Francisco-­based, non-­profit organization dedicated to the advancement of women in music production and the recording arts. In a field where women are chronically under­-represented (less than 5%), WAM seeks to "change the face of sound" by providing hands-­on training, experience, career counseling and job placement to women and girls in media technology for music, radio, film, television and the internet. WAM believes that women's mastery of music technology and inclusion in the production process will expand the vision and voice of media and popular culture. WAM trains over 1,200 women and girls a year in music production and the recording arts in the world's only professional recording studio built and run by women.

Facebook: www.facebook.com/womensaudiomission
Twitter: @womensaudio
Instagram: womensaudiomission
Website: www.womensaudiomission.org

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Posted: Thursday, August 25, 2016

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AES141 Meet the Sponsors! PSP Audio

AES141 Meet the Sponsors! PSP Audio

PSPaudioware develops high quality audio effect and processor plug-ins. Their products garner rave reviews and endorsements from every corner of the music production, engineering, composition, and post-production worlds and become staples in professional and home studios worldwide. 

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Posted: Wednesday, August 24, 2016

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AES 141 Meet the Sponsors! Linear Audio

AES 141 Meet the Sponsors! Linear Audio

Leading audio magazine Linear Audio is sponsoring the Student Competition once again! 

Linear Audio publishes technical articles about technology, developments and the state of the art in audio and perception from a technical perspective.

It is meant for anyone who is interested in technical audio developments or who wants to contribute. Being employed in audio engineering is not a requirement.

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Posted: Tuesday, August 23, 2016

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AES140 Student Recording Competition Interview: Ksenia Degtyareva

AES140 Student Recording Competition Interview: Ksenia Degtyareva

Tell us a little about yourself. Where are you from and what do you study?

 

My name is Kseniya Degtyareva and I am from Belarus. I’ve just finished my bachelor degree at audio engineering at Belarusian State Academy of Art. Also I work as a sound engineer at Belarusian State Academic Musical Theatre. I had an idea to enter the master program at my university, but unfortunately I’ve missed exams due to business trip to China. But maybe it’s better, because current master program is focused more on arts than on my speciality. So I plan to wait a year and try to continue my education at master degree somewhere abroad. 

 

What initiated your passion for audio? When did it start? 

 

I went to music school to learn piano when I was five. More than other lessons I liked solfeggio. All my childhood I tried to make something creative, like making concerts for the parents with singing, dancing and playing instruments or writing songs on piano. All of this was naive, but I spent a lot of time for such things. When I finished school I had to make a decision about my further education. First I wanted to go to music college to study music theory. But then I decided that it is not perspective and chose linguistic college. Maybe it was my fault. During study at college I thought about what I want from my life and made some electronic music for indie games in my free time. After graduation I had an ability to enter the linguistics university directly to the 3rd year. It was my parent's’ dream, but not mine. After long searching I found an audio engineering specialty at academy of arts and passed exams. Every day during study I understood that it was absolutely right choice. I started searching for some additional education materials, tried to do extra projects with musicians. In a year audio became my passion. 

 

Tell us about production of your submission? What is the story behind it? What it was inspired by? How long did you work on it? Was it your first entry?

 

I learned about student recording competition last summer. I was so disappointed, because I’ve missed not only student competition, but the whole convention that took place nearby (138th AES convention was in Warsaw). It was impossible for me to visit the next convention in New York, so I had to wait a year to participate. That year during each recording session I thought about how it could fit the competition. I initiated some projects myself to gain more material to choose from. On February we’ve rented a studio with young jazz band to record their songs. It was a session in a hurry, guys had to go to jobs after recording. I’ve made a rough demo, but musicians were not satisfied with their playing, they asked me to record them later again. I had to leave Minsk for a month and came back in April. I tried to initiate a new recording session, but musicians didn’t have enough time for that. At the same time I had an access to digital mixing console and thought that it would be a good idea to work with some previously recorded material. There was one composition that I liked the most from that February jazz recording session and I started to mix it. To say true, almost till deadline I was not sure which track to submit for competition, as I had some not bad records suitable for the first category. But all of April I didn’t stop working with that jazz composition. Unfortunately, I have no mixing room which I can fully trust. That’s why I checked my mix wherever it was possible. While listening at new systems I found some errors and came for new mixing ideas.

 

What was your most significant/funny/inspiring experience as an audio engineer?

 

A few years ago I had a live recording session in a church and I’ve forgot to take an extension cord with me, so I couldn’t connect laptop and an audio interface in the same place. I was lucky as there was a shop not so far from the church so I could buy a new one. If not, the concert would have gone without being recorded. That was a good lesson on how important in our profession to be focused and keep lots of things in mind. 

 

What was your biggest mistake in a production and what did you do to redeem the situation?

 

I think my biggest mistake as an audio engineer was when I made film production as a course work with the student-director. We finished production, but during exam he had some notes from professors, that the sense of the movie could be not fully understandable by viewers. So director decided to add some off-screen speech. The actress and academy studio time were absolutely busy and we had only ten minutes to make project, set the mic and record phrases. By default project settings sample rate was 44 kHz. So we started to record, and then I understood that the whole film was recorded at 48 kHz. Tried to be fast I forgot to check so important setting. Absolutely fault was to change sample rate at the middle of the session. So I lose quality of some important phrases and couldn't find tools to fix the problem to achieve a good result.

 

What’s your advice for engineers who are just starting out?

 

I would tell them to attend more professional events, to read literature to be up-to-date, to share experience with friends - sound engineers, not to be afraid of critics and practice a lot. 

 

What are your favorite pieces of equipment (microphones, outboard, plugins) and why?

 

Our academy doesn’t have plenty of equipment, there is no matched stereo pair, except AKG C414, which we are not allowed to take out. So I absolutely happy to have my own pairs of Rode NT5 and M5. I usually use NT5 as main stereo pair. M5 are good for many instruments, for example, to catch piano in stereo. I wish to have more channels, but now audio interface Tascam US-2000 allows me to be independent and make some records whenever I want. I like its separate knobs control for input signal, for sound from computer and for levels for headphones and monitors. 

 

What/who made you join to AES?

 

As I know, I am the first member of AES from Belarus. I just surfed the internet looking for competitions and events for student audio engineers. Finding AES website was like opening the new world. I regret that it happened last summer, not some years earlier. 

 

Tell us about your favorite experiences at the 140th AES convention in Paris!

 

It was not only my first recording competition, but my first convention. I really liked exhibition, before I never had an ability to try such great amount of top equipment. I was absolutely impressed by main speech, for me it was bright example of how presentation should be look like. During convention I knew a lot from speakers, it is pity that many interesting presentations were in the same time. I really thankful for ability to visit Conservatoire de Paris. It was very interesting to became familiar how the other students do they study and highly motivated me to try my best to do my master in a place like this. And I was absolutely happy to meet so many interesting people during convention. Now in my plans to realize trip to 141st convention in Los Angeles.

 

What is your favourite frequency?

 

I think it is 2 kHz, because I raise it and cut more often than others frequencies.

 

What do you do when you’re not in the studio or doing anything music related?

 

I read books, watch films, go to theaters or concerts. During trips to Europe I try to find interesting organ music concerts in churches, so the concert at convention was like extra gift for me. Also I like ballet and do some lessons for amateurs when I have a free time. 

 

Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

 

I hope I will have my own studio and ability to work with top musicians, enough knowledge and experience to share them with students at universities and with auditorium during presentations at special events. 

 

Could you provide us with some closing comments?

 

I am grateful to the AES community and to SDA, especially, for such a strong support for students. For me the recording competition was a good way to check myself and to become familiar with other works from universities all over the world. I’m happy to have such a high estimation from great professionals out of my industry. Now I feel like I have a lot of energy and ideas for new projects. 

 

To hear Ksenia's winning entry (Post Scriptum Jazz - The Thought of That Memorable Moment) visit her website


Posted: Monday, August 22, 2016

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AES140 Student Recording Competition Interview: Andreas Lammel

AES140 Student Recording Competition Interview: Andreas Lammel

Tell us a little bit about yourself. Where are you from? Where and what do you study? What audio field are you in? What initiated your passion for audio? When did it start?

 

I was born and grew up in Southern Germany in a little town (Ansbach, probably no one knows it). I studied jazz piano at Carl-Maria-von-Weber University in Dresden and am currently in the last semester in my studies as Tonmeister at the University of Arts in Berlin. I think I’m specialized in jazz and popular music but in general I’m interested in various kinds of music recording. 

I’m a musician myself and it's my passion to play piano and saxophone but I also want to have a global view of music and music production. 

With my piano trio Lammel | Lauer | Bornstein (lammel-lauer-bornstein.de ) we play what we call "contemporary acoustic music“. This year, we recorded our second album with producer Wolfgang Loos at Traumton Studios, Berlin. It will will be released in November at Traumton Records, you can watch our release video here :-) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bNaymlsPRDM

 

Tell us about the production of your submission. What is the story behind it? What was it inspired by? How long did you work on it? Was it your first entry? 

 

I spent a great extended weekend at the recpublica studios in Poland last December with the band KITE (kitejazz.de) We were recording a complete album, it will be released this November @ UNIT Records. My submission I got Along without You very Well is part of the album. It´s a completely re-freshed version of that well known song as sung by Frank Sinatra for example. The version of KITE has a completely new, contemporary background in harmonies and other elements, the constant pattern of the upright bass, for example. The style is very smooth but indeed intense - what I really like. My approach when mixing this song was to bring back the clarity and pureness of a pop song to this contemporary jazz version and I spent a lot of time to find the perfect balance.

This submission was my second award at AES Recording Competition. Last year at Warsaw I took part with Tristan Kühn with What´s left by the piano trio Seng|Kühn|Jentzen.

 

What was your most significant/funny/inspiring experience as an audio engineer? 

 

I find it most inspiring to work with people with a mixed cultural and musical / artistic background. This inspiring context enables to embed various ideas and elements in one production. 

 

What was your biggest mistake in a production and what did you do to redeem the situation?

 

I really don't know what you mean! But if you update the whole audio project to your backup hard disk, you should keep an eye on which direction you transfer dates and not  replace the latest session with an old version. Otherwise you’ll have the chance to do the edits from one ore more days once again…

 

What’s your advice for engineers who are just starting out?

 

Always  pay attention to the kind of music and the artist. Use your technical and musical knowledge to support them. At the end of the day, it’s the music that matters, so use your various skills to support the idea of the production.

 

What are your favourite pieces of equipment (microphones, outboard, plugins), and why?

 

My chair - it is very important to be comfortable while working. A studio with sunlight is also very important (unfortunately I don’t have one...). Jokes apart, I really like the PSP Vintage Warmer, also when mixing classical music (thank you, I won one at the competition!) and the (original) Urei 1176 compressor. 

For most studio productions and live recordings I work with Magix´ Seqouia, I enjoy various opportunities when crossfading and cutting there. For popular music productions I usually work with Pro Tools. 

Talking about miking, I often have a basement stereo AB-system with two „real“ omni-pattern condensator microphones e.g. when recording drums as Overhead mics oder a Grand Piano. I like the balanced sound of this type of microphone and the authentic recording qualities of low frequencies. 

 

Can you name one or multiple of your favourite recordings or productions and tell us why  you like them/what you like about them?

 

I like productions that you can listen to casually and that have also depth and thousands details to explore. Good examples are the productions by Quincy Jones and the well known album by Daft Punk.

 

What/who made you join the AES? 

 

It’s pretty cool to have a worldwide audio connection for making experiences and  discussions. Meet and connect with people, who do same / similiar things, but might have different backgrounds and various views. Bringing that global pool of audio engineers together is an important point. Last year I was the first time at the AES convention at Warschau. Some colleagues from university prompted me to go there and I really don’t regret it :)

 

Tell us about your favourite experiences at the 140th AES Convention in Paris!

 

I had a lot of fun spending time in Paris with other audio engineers. People with a similar passion, perhaps different views - great discussions and not just about audio.

 

What is your favourite frequency?

 

I only have frequencies that I don’t like, for example around 500Hz (and 1000 Hz as harmonic) when you have a microphone system close to a grand piano.

 

What do you do when you’re not in the studio or doing anything music related?  

 

I like to travel and meet friends. Nature is cool - and also the dust and flair of impressive cities.

 

Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

 

Making interesting productions, playing my own music.

 

Could you provide us with some closing comments?

 

See you at next AES convention?!


Posted: Friday, August 19, 2016

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