AES San Francisco 2012
Networked Audio Track Event Details

Friday, October 26, 9:00 am — 10:30 am (Room 122)

Paper Session: P2 - Networked Audio

Chair:
Ellen Juhlin, Meyer Sound - Berkeley, CA, USA; AVnu Alliance

P2-1 Audio Latency Masking in Music Telepresence Using Artificial ReverberationRen Gang, University of Rochester - Rochester, NY, USA; Samarth Shivaswamy, University of Rochester - Rochester, NY, USA; Stephen Roessner, University of Rochester - Rochester, NY, USA; Akshay Rao, University of Rochester - Rochester, NY, USA; Dave Headlam, University of Rochester - Rochester, NY, USA; Mark F. Bocko, University of Rochester - Rochester, NY, USA
Network latency poses significant challenges in music telepresence systems designed to enable multiple musicians at different locations to perform together in real-time. Since each musician hears a delayed version of the performance from the other musicians it is difficult to maintain synchronization and there is a natural tendency for the musicians to slow their tempo while awaiting response from their fellow performers. We asked if the introduction of artificial reverberation can enable musicians to better tolerate latency by conducting experiments with performers where the degree of latency was controllable and for which artificial reverberation could be added or not. Both objective and subjective evaluation of ensemble performances were conducted to evaluate the perceptual responses at different experimental settings.
Convention Paper 8688 (Purchase now)

P2-2 Service Discovery Using Open Sound ControlAndrew Eales, Wellington Institute of Technology - Wellington, New Zealand; Rhodes University - Grahamstown, South Africa; Richard Foss, Rhodes University - Grahamstown, Eastern Cape, South Africa
The Open Sound Control (OSC) control protocol does not have service discovery capabilities. The approach to adding service discovery to OSC proposed in this paper uses the OSC address space to represent services within the context of a logical device model. This model allows services to be represented in a context-sensitive manner by relating parameters representing services to the logical organization of a device. Implementation of service discovery is done using standard OSC messages and requires that the OSC address space be designed to support these messages. This paper illustrates how these enhancements to OSC allow a device to advertise its services. Controller applications can then explore the device’s address space to discover services and retrieve the services required by the application.
Convention Paper 8689 (Purchase now)

P2-3 Flexilink: A Unified Low Latency Network Architecture for Multichannel Live AudioYonghao Wang, Birmingham City University - Birmingham, UK; John Grant, Nine Tiles Networks Ltd. - Cambridge, UK; Jeremy Foss, Birmingham City University - Birmingham, UK
The networking of live audio for professional applications typically uses layer 2-based solutions such as AES50 and MADI utilizing fixed time slots similar to Time Division Multiplexing (TDM). However, these solutions are not effective for best effort traffic where data traffic utilizes available bandwidth and is consequently subject to variations in QoS. There are audio networking methods such as AES47, which is based on asynchronous transfer mode (ATM), but ATM equipment is rarely available. Audio can also be sent over Internet Protocol (IP), but the size of the packet headers and the difficulty of keeping latency within acceptable limits make it unsuitable for many applications. In this paper we propose a new unified low latency network architecture that supports both time deterministic and best effort traffic toward full bandwidth utilization with high performance routing/switching. For live audio, this network architecture allows low latency as well as the flexibility to support multiplexing multiple channels with different sampling rates and word lengths.
Convention Paper 8690 (Purchase now)

 
 

Friday, October 26, 10:45 am — 12:30 pm (Room 132)

Product Design: PD2 - AVB Networking for Product Designers

Chair:
Rob Silfvast, Avid - Mountain View, CA, USA
Panelists:
John Bergen, Marvell
Jeff Koftinoff, Meyer Sound Canada - Vernon, BC, Canada
Morten Lave, TC Applied Technologies - Toronto, ON, Canada
Lee Minich, Lab X Technologies - Rochester, NY, USA
Matthew Mora, Chair IEEE 1722.1 - Pleasanton, CA, USA
Dave Olsen, Harman International
Michael Johas Teener, Broadcom - Santa Cruz, CA, USA


Abstract:
This session will cover the essential technical aspects of Audio Video Bridging technology and how it can be deployed in products to support standards-based networked connectivity. AVB is an open IEEE standard and therefore promises low cost and wide interoperability among products that leverage the technology. Speakers from several different companies will share insights on their experiences deploying AVB in real products. The panelists will also compare and contrast the open-standards approach of AVB with proprietary audio-over-Ethernet technologies.

 
 

Friday, October 26, 2:15 pm — 3:45 pm (Room 131)

Broadcast and Streaming Media: B3 - Broadcast Audio Network Techniques

Chair:
Dan Braverman, Radio Systems - Logan Township, NJ, USA
Panelists:
Tag Borland, Logitek Electronic Systems Inc. - Houston, TX, USA
Andreas Hildebrand, ALC NetworX - Munich, Germany
Kelly Parker, Wheatstone
Greg Shay, Telos Alliance/Axia - Cleveland, OH, USA


Abstract:
Broadcasting, especially in the studio arena has suffered mightily from lack of standards (or as the old joke goes; “from liking standards so much we created too many!"). Without any analogous MIDI-like control or serial protocol, integrating today’s studio remains a science project. But audio over IP presents—and more aptly demands—a standard protocol if our new industry hardware and peripherals are literally going to communicate.

This session will overview the current implemented broadcast VOIP standards with an emphasis on interoperability challenging the participating manufacturers to reveal their plans, issues and hurtles in adapting and implementing a standard.

 
 

Friday, October 26, 2:45 pm — 6:00 pm (Tech Tours)

Technical Tour: TT2 - Tamalpais Research Institute (TRI)


Abstract:
Created by Grateful Dead founding member Bob Weir, TRI (www.tristudios.com) is a $5+ million, state-of-the-art performance studio for broadcasting live video and audio streams to the internet. The 11,500-square-foot complex has two studios, including a 2,000-square-foot main studio with a the Meyers Sound Constellation System. Control room A seamlessly integrates a 48 channel 7.1 surround API analog console with racks of outboard gear spanning from decades of Grateful Dead tours to the latest technology. The entire facility is interconnected for audio and HD video recording. The visionary broadcast and recording capabilities offer a revolutionary new concept, allowing fans to enjoy intimate live performances from wherever they have internet access.

This event is limited to 42 tickets.

Technical Tours are made available on a first come, first served basis. Tickets can be purchased during normal registration hours at the convention center.

Price: Members $40/Nonmembers $50

 
 

Friday, October 26, 4:00 pm — 6:00 pm (Room 123)

Network Audio: N1 - Error-Tolerant Audio Coding

Chair:
David Trainor, CSR - Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK
Panelists:
Bernhard Grill, Fraunhofer IIS - Erlangen, Germany
Deepen Sinha, ATC Labs - Newark, NJ, USA
Gary Spittle, Dolby Laboratories - San Francisco, CA, USA


Abstract:
Two important and observable trends are the increasing delivery of real-time audio services over the Internet or cellular network and also the implementation of audio networking throughout a residence, office or studio using wireless technologies. This approach to distributing audio content is convenient, ubiquitous, and can be relatively inexpensive. However the nature of these networks is such that their capacity and reliability for real-time audio streaming can vary considerably with time and environment. Therefore error-tolerant audio coding techniques have an important role to play in maintaining audio quality for relevant applications. This workshop will discuss the capabilities of error-tolerant audio coding algorithms and recent advances in the state of the art.

 
 

Friday, October 26, 4:00 pm — 5:30 pm (Room 120)

Live Sound Seminar: LS3 - Practical Application of Audio Networking for Live Sound

Chair:
Kevin Kimmel, Yamaha Commercial Audio - Fullerton, CA, USA
Panelists:
Steve Seable, Yamaha Commercial Audio - Fullerton, CA, USA
Steve Smoot, Yamaha Commercial Audio - Fullerton, CA, USA
Kieran Walsh, Audinate Pty. Ltd. - Ultimo, NSW, Australia


Abstract:
This panel will focus on the use of several audio networking technologies, including A-Net, Dante, EtherSound, Cobranet, Optocore, Rocknet, and AVnu AVB and their deployment in live sound applications. Network panelists will be industry professionals who have experience working with various network formats.

 
 

Friday, October 26, 4:00 pm — 5:30 pm (Room 131)

Broadcast and Streaming Media: B4 - Audio Encoding for Streaming

Chair:
Fred Willard, Univision - Washington, DC, USA
Panelists:
Casey Camba, Dolby Labs
Robert Reams, Streaming Appliances/DSP Concepts - Mill Creek, WA, USA
Samuel Sousa, Triton Digital - Montreal, QC, Canada
Jason Thibeault, Limelight


Abstract:
This session will discuss various methods of encoding audio for streaming. What is most efficient for particular uses? Various bit rates and compression algorithms are used, what are the advantages, what are the disadvantages?

 
 

Friday, October 26, 5:30 pm — 6:30 pm (Room 124)

TC Meeting: Networked Audio Systems


Abstract:
Technical Committee Meeting on Networked Audio Systems

 
 

Saturday, October 27, 9:00 am — 10:30 am (Room 131)

Broadcast and Streaming Media: B5 - Stream Distribution: IP in the Mobile Environment

Chair:
David Layer, National Association of Broadcasters - Washington, DC, USA
Panelists:
Mike Daskalopoulos, Dolby Labs
Samuel Sousa, Triton Digital - Montreal, QC, Canada
Jason Thibeault, Limelight


Abstract:
The public has demanded the portability of stream listening, whether in a handheld or other mobile devices including the car. There are a variety of streaming technologies in the marketplace that can support portable streaming, and in this session representatives from three of the leading companies in this space will offer their insights and vision. Some of the specific topics to be covered include: Audio on mobile, the list of challenges; how mobile streaming can interact with traditional in-car listening; HTML5—savior or just more trouble?; and challenges in IP streaming and advertising interaction.

 
 

Saturday, October 27, 10:00 am — 11:30 am (Foyer)

Engineering Brief: EB1 - eBrief Presentations—Posters 1

EB1-1 Accuracy of ITU-R BS.1770 Algorithm in Evaluating Multitrack MaterialPedro Duarte Pestana, CITAR-UCP - Almada, Portugal; CEAUL-FCUL; Alvaro Barbosa, Universidade Lisboa - Lisbon, Portugal
Loudness measurement that is computationally efficient and applicable on digital material disregarding listening level is a very important feature for automatic mixing. Recent work in broadcast specifications of loudness (ITU-R BS.1770) deserved broad acceptance and seems a likely candidate for extension to multitrack material, though the original design did not bear in mind this kind of development. Some empirical observations have suggested that certain types of individual source materials are not evaluated properly by the ITU’s algorithm. In this paper a subjective test is presented that tries to shed some light on the subject.
Engineering Brief 53 (Download now)

EB1-2 An Online Resource for the Subjective Comparison of Vocal MicrophonesBradford Swanson, University of Massachusetts - Lowell - Lowell, MA, USA
Forty-eight microphones were gathered into small groups and tested using four vocalists (two male, two female). The recorded results are collected online so users may subjectively compare a single performance on closely related microphones.
Engineering Brief 54 (Download now)

EB1-3 Perception of Distance and the Effect on Sound Recording Distance Suitability for a 3-D or 2-D ImageLuiz Fernando Kruszielski, Tokyo University of the Arts - Adachi-ku, Tokyo, Japan; Toru Kamekawa, Tokyo University of the Arts - Tokyo, Japan; Atsushi Marui, Tokyo University of the Arts - Adachi-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Possible differences in the perception of the sound caused by 3-D image are still unclear. The aim of this research is to understand a possible difference in the perception of distance caused by interaction of sound and 3-D image compared to a 2-D image and also how this could affect the suitability of the sound recording distance. Using a 3-D setup, a saxophone player was recorded at five different distances. The subjects where asked to judge their subjective distance and also the suitable sound for the presented image. The results show that one group perceived 3-D to be more distant, however it did not change the sound suitability compared 3-D to 2-D.
Engineering Brief 55 (Download now)

EB1-4 Modeling Auditory-Haptic Interface Cues from an Analog Multi-line TelephoneDurand Begault, Human Systems Integration Division, NASA Ames Research Center - Moffett Field, CA, USA; Mark R. Anderson, Dell Systems, NASA Ames Research Center - Moffett Field, CA, USA; Rachel M. Bittner, New York University - New York, NY, USA
The Western Electric company produced influential multi-line telephone designs during the 1940s–1970s using a six-button interface (line selection, hold button, intercom). Its simplicity was an example of a successful human factors design. Unlike touchscreen or membrane switches used in its modern equivalents, the older multi-line telephone used raised surface mechanical buttons that provided robust tactile, haptic, and auditory cues. This multi-line telephone was used as a model for a trade study comparison of two interfaces: a touchscreen interface (iPad) versus a pressure-sensitive strain gauge button interface (Phidget USB interface controllers). This engineering brief describes how the interface logic and the visual and auditory cues of the original telephone were analyzed and then synthesized using MAX-MSP. (The experiment and results are detailed in the authors' AES 133rd convention paper "Multimodal Information Management: Evaluation of Auditory and Haptic Cues for NextGen Communication Displays").
Engineering Brief 56 (Download now)

EB1-5 Tailoring Practice Room Acoustics to Student NeedsScott R. Burgess, Central Michigan University - Mt. Pleasant, MI, USA
A crucial part of any music education facility is the student practice rooms. While these rooms typically vary in size, the acoustic treatments often take a "one size fits all" approach. This can lead to student dissatisfaction and a lack of rooms that are suitable to some instruments. The School of Music at Central Michigan University surveyed our students and created a variety of acoustic environments based on the results of this survey. This presentation will discuss this process and the results of the follow-up survey, which indicates an improvement in student satisfaction, along with suggestions for further study.
Engineering Brief 57 (Download now)

EB1-6 Acoustic Properties of Small Practice Rooms Where Musicians Can Practice Contentedly: Effect of Reverberation on PracticeRitsuko Tsuchikura, SONA Corp. - Nakano-ku, Tokyo, Japan; Masataka Nakahara, ONFUTURE Ltd. - Tokyo, Japan; SONA Corp. - Tokyo, Japan; Takashi Mikami, SONA Co. - Tokyo, Japan; Toru Kamekawa, Tokyo University of the Arts - Tokyo, Japan; Atsushi Marui, Tokyo University of the Arts - Adachi-ku, Tokyo, Japan
This paper describes results of study on practice room acoustics regarding the level of satisfaction players feel about the acoustical conditions. Two different factors are found to be involved for musicians to evaluate the acoustics of practice rooms: "comfort in practice" and "comfort in performance." Further evaluation of the two factors shows that "comfort in practice" and "comfort in performance" have different desired reverberation times. The average absorption coefficients, therefore, are estimated. Though the experiments were carried out on several kinds of instruments, this paper describes the results of experiments involving trumpeters and violinists.
Engineering Brief 58 (Download now)

EB1-7 Bellamy Baffle Array: A Multichannel Recording Technique to Improve Listener EnvelopmentSteven Bellamy, Humber College - Toronto, ON, Canada
The paper outlines a 6-microphone technique that makes use of a baffle between front and rear arrays. This addresses three common challenges in multichannel recording for 5.1 channel playback. First, to improve the sense of connectedness between LS/RS, L/LS and R/RS channel pairs. Second, to maintain clarity of the direct sound while allowing for strong levels of room sound in the mix. Third, to provide a flexible system that can work well with a variety of ensembles. The result is a flexible microphone technique that results in recordings of increased clarity and envelopment.
Engineering Brief 59 (Download now)

 
 

Saturday, October 27, 2:00 pm — 3:30 pm (Room 123)

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Network Audio: N2 - Open IP Protocols for Audio Networking

Presenter:
Kevin Gross, AVA Networks - Boulder, CO, USA


Abstract:
The networking and telecommunication industry has its own set of network protocols for carriage of audio and video over IP networks. These protocols have been widely deployed for telephony and teleconferencing applications, internet streaming, and cable television. This tutorial will acquaint attendees with these protocols and their capabilities and limitations. The relationship to AVB protocols will be discussed.

Specifically, attendees will learn about Internet protocol (IP), voice over IP (VoIP), IP television (IPTV), HTTP streaming, real-time transport protocol (RTP), real-time transport control protocol (RTCP), real-time streaming protocol (RTSP), session initiation protocol (SIP), session description protocol (SDP), Bonjour, session announcement protocol (SAP), differentiated services (DiffServ), and IEEE 1588 precision time protocol (PTP)

An overview of AES standards work, X192, adapting these protocols to high-performance audio applications will be given.

 
 

Saturday, October 27, 4:00 pm — 6:00 pm (Room 123)

Network Audio: N3 - Audio Networks—Paradigm Shift for Broadcasters

Chair:
Stefan Ledergerber, Lawo Group - Zurich, Switzerland; LES Switzerland GmbH
Panelists:
Kevin Gross, AVA Networks - Boulder, CO, USA
Andreas Hildebrand, ALC NetworX - Munich, Germany
Sonja Langhans, Institut für Rundfunktechnik - Munich, Germany
Lee Minich, Lab X Technologies - Rochester, NY, USA
Greg Shay, Telos Alliance/Axia - Cleveland, OH, USA
Kieran Walsh, Audinate Pty. Ltd. - Ultimo, NSW, Australia


Abstract:
Today a variety of audio networking technologies are emerging. However, a number of questions related to workflow in broadcasting organizations seem still unanswered. This panel will try to find possible answers to some of the hot topics, such as:

• Will traditional crosspoint matrix switches (routers) disappear and fully be replaced by networks?
• Which component will deal with signal processing, which is currently done within audio routers?
• Which department is handling audio networks: audio or IT?
• How do we educate personnel handling audio networks?

The panelists will explain their views from a technology provider point of view, but lively participation by the audience is highly appreciated.

 
 

Sunday, October 28, 9:00 am — 10:30 am (Room 123)

Network Audio: N4 - AVnu – The Unified AV Network: Overview and Panel Discussion

Chair:
Rob Silfvast, Avid - Mountain View, CA, USA
Panelists:
Ellen Juhlin, Meyer Sound - Berkeley, CA, USA; AVnu Alliance
Denis Labrecque, Analog Devices - San Jose, CA, USA
Lee Minich, Lab X Technologies - Rochester, NY, USA
Bill Murphy, Extreme Networks
Michael Johas Teener, Broadcom - Santa Cruz, CA, USA


Abstract:
This session will provide an overview of the AVnu Alliance, a consortium of audio and video product makers and core technology companies committed to delivering an interoperable open standard for audio/video networked connectivity built upon IEEE Audio Video Bridging standards. AVnu offers a logo-testing program that allows products to become certified for interoperability, much like the Wi-Fi Alliance provides for the IEEE 802.11 family of standards. Representatives from several different member companies will speak in this panel discussion and provide insights about AVB technology and participation in the AVnu Alliance.

 
 

Sunday, October 28, 11:00 am — 12:30 pm (Room 123)

Network Audio: N5 - Interoperability Issues in Audio Transport over IP-Based Networks

Chair:
Timothy Shuttleworth, Oceanside, CA, USA
Panelists:
Kevin Gross, AVA Networks - Boulder, CO, USA
Sonja Langhans, Institut für Rundfunktechnik - Munich, Germany
Lee Minich, Lab X Technologies - Rochester, NY, USA
Greg Shay, Telos Alliance/Axia - Cleveland, OH, USA


Abstract:
This Workshop will focus on interoperability issues in two areas of audio/media transport over IP based networks. These are:

• Multichannel Audio distribution over Ethernet LANs for low latency, high reliability interconnections in home, automobile, and commercial environments. Interoperability standards and methods based on the Ethernet AVB suite of IEEE standards as well as the AES X-192 interoperability project shall be discussed.

• Audio Contribution over Internet Protocol (ACIP and ACIP2) interoperability issues will be discussed from both a European and US perspective with presenters discussing activities within the EBU community and the US broadcasting market. Audio over IP methods are being widely used in remote broadcast situations. The challenges and solutions in achieving reliable content distribution shall be examined.

Cross-vendor operability is becoming increasingly demanded in all audio applications markets. This topic will be of interest to audio systems designers and users across the gamut of market segments. Two presenters will provide their overview within each of the three topic areas.

 
 

Sunday, October 28, 2:00 pm — 3:00 pm (Room 133)

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Network Audio: N6 - High Performance over IP

Presenter:
Rupert Brun, BBC Audio & Music - London, UK


Abstract:
In the summer of 2010 Brun conducted a simple experiment, making one week of classical music concerts available on-line in high quality and with wide dynamic range. He will explain how he used Twitter and a blog to get real time feedback from the audience and the overwhelming response from the public and press to this simple idea. In the autumn of 2010 it was decided that we would make the “HD Sound” feed permanently available and eventually made it the default for delivery of classical music over IP. This session will explore the future for delivery of audio to the audience over IP and some of the opportunities it presents, while acknowledging why it is seen as a threat to traditional broadcast.

Details of the experiment can be found here:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/bbcinternet/2010/09/bbc_proms_extra_high_quality_audio.html

 
 

Sunday, October 28, 3:00 pm — 4:30 pm (Room 123)

Network Audio: N7 - Audio Network Device Connection and Control

Chair:
Richard Foss, Rhodes University - Grahamstown, Eastern Cape, South Africa
Panelists:
Jeffrey Alan Berryman, Bosch Communications - Flesherton, ON, Canada
Andreas Hildebrand, ALC NetworX - Munich, Germany
Jeff Koftinoff, Meyer Sound Canada - Vernon, BC, Canada
Kieran Walsh, Audinate Pty. Ltd. - Ultimo, NSW, Australia


Abstract:
In this session a number of industry experts will describe and demonstrate how they have enabled the discovery of audio devices on local area networks, their subsequent connection management, and also control over their various parameters. The workshop will start with a panel discussion that introduces issues related to streaming audio, such as bandwidth management and synchronization, as well as protocols that enable connection management and control. The panelists will have demonstrations of their particular audio network solutions. They will describe these solutions as part of the panel discussion, and will provide closer demonstrations following the panel discussion.

 
 

Sunday, October 28, 4:30 pm — 6:00 pm (Foyer)

Network Audio: N8 - Audio Network Device Connection and Control—Demos

Chair:
Richard Foss, Rhodes University - Grahamstown, Eastern Cape, South Africa
Panelists:
Jeffrey Alan Berryman, Bosch Communications - Flesherton, ON, Canada
Andreas Hildebrand, ALC NetworX - Munich, Germany
Jeff Koftinoff, Meyer Sound Canada - Vernon, BC, Canada
Kieran Walsh, Audinate Pty. Ltd. - Ultimo, NSW, Australia


Abstract:
In this session a number of industry experts will describe and demonstrate how they have enabled the discovery of audio devices on local area networks, their subsequent connection management, and also control over their various parameters. The workshop will start with a panel discussion that introduces issues related to streaming audio, such as bandwidth management and synchronization, as well as protocols that enable connection management and control. The panellists will have demonstrations of their particular audio network solutions. They will describe these solutions as part of the panel discussion, and will provide closer demonstrations following the panel discussion.

 
 

Monday, October 29, 9:00 am — 10:00 am (Room 130)

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Product Design: PD10 - Ethernet Standard Audio

Presenter:
Stephen Lampen, Belden - San Francisco, CA, USA


Abstract:
Ethernet has been around since 1973, and with the rise of twisted-pair-based Ethernet there have been many companies who played around to get Ethernet to work for multichannel audio. The problem is that all of their solutions were proprietary and not always compatible between manufacturers. This was the impetus behind IEEE 802.1BA AVB, a re-write of the Ethernet standard to include many bells and whistles for audio and video applications. This presentation will show AVB switches, how they are different, and what is in this new standard.

 
 

Monday, October 29, 1:30 pm — 3:00 pm (Room 131)

Broadcast and Streaming Media: B16 - The Streaming Experience

Chair:
Rusty Hodge, SomaFM - San Francisco, CA, USA
Panelists:
Mike Daskalopoulos, Dolby Labs
Jason Thibeault, Limelight
Leigh Newsome, Targetspot - New York, NY, USA
Robert Reams, Streaming Appliances/DSP Concepts - Mill Creek, WA, USA


Abstract:
How are consumers listening to streaming audio today, and how can broadcasters improve that experience? What is the future direction that streaming audio should be taking?

Home streaming on hardware devices often suffers from limitations of the hardware UI in terms of selecting between tens of thousands of available channels. How can we improve that? Mobile streaming still doesn't match the convenience of turning on your car and having the AM/FM radio start right up. What can and is being done to change that?

What does the future of CODECs hold and what formats should broadcasters be streaming in to create the best quality while achieving universal accessibility?
How do we improve the continuity between the home and mobile environment, especially in regard to customized streams? What are listeaners unhappy with now and what can be done about it?

We will also talk about the future of customized content and the integration of live broadcast content with customized streams.

 
 


Return to Networked Audio Track Events

EXHIBITION HOURS October 27th 10am – 6pm October 28th 10am – 6pm October 29th 10am – 4pm
REGISTRATION DESK October 25th 3pm – 7pm October 26th 8am – 6pm October 27th 8am – 6pm October 28th 8am – 6pm October 29th 8am – 4pm
TECHNICAL PROGRAM October 26th 9am – 7pm October 27th 9am – 7pm October 28th 9am – 7pm October 29th 9am – 5pm
AES - Audio Engineering Society