AES Regions

New York AES Section

If there is a meeting topic you think would be of interest to the membership, please contact us. There is no fee to attend most section meetings and they're open to everyone with an interest in professional audio. Students are especially welcome at all meetings.

Our website also contains a list of Past Meeting Reports and an Officer List.

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Past Event: "I Am Your Future: Careers in Audio"

March 10, 2016 at 7:00 pm

Location: NYU's Steinhardt 35 West 4th St 3rd Floor

Moderated by: Howard Schwartz and Maggie Luthar

Speaker(s): Avi Laniado – Harbor Films; Dan Millice – Engine Room Audio; Jared Goodstadt – High 5 Games; John Kilgore – John Kilgore Sound & Recording; Howard Schwartz – Consultant and owner of the legendary HSRNY Studios; Jon Kita – Conclave Studios; Mike Battaglia – CEO, Triomi

 

What part of the audio business do you want to break into? How do you do it? Is your entry into the audio workforce imminent? Are you still in an audio-centric program and want to get ahead of your peers? Then attend this meeting and gain insights from those in the business.

What do people look for in prospective interns? What do they expect interns to walk away with when their internship is finished? Does interning give you an advantage over others when trying to get an assistant position?

If you have already completed an internship, then what do people look for in prospective assistants? What is the progression from an assistant? What skills are emerging that are important to have?

The audio business changes regularly. How have things changed over time? How have they
stayed the same? What things are not taught in schooling that can only be learned by actually being involved at a facility?

If you attend this meeting, you will hear these questions and others addressed. 

 


Posted: Sunday, March 6, 2016

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Past Event: Distortion FX — Recording and Mix Strategies with Alex Case

January 12, 2016 at 7:00 pm

Location: Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music, NYU - Studio 510. 194 Mercer Street - 5th Fl

Moderated by: Jim Anderson

Speaker(s): Alex U. Case - University of Massachusetts Lowell

 Distortion, deliberately applied to elements of your mix, is a source of energy that lifts tracks up out of a crowded arrangement and adds excitement to the performance.  Accidental distortion, on the other hand, is a certain sign that the production is unprofessional, dragging down its chance for success.  Amps, stomp boxes, tubes, transformers, tape machines, the plug-ins that emulate them, and the plug-ins that create wholly new forms of distortion all offer a rich palette of distortion colors.  Mix engineers must know how to choose among them, and how to tailor them to the music.  Case takes a close look at distortion, detailing the technical goings-on when things break-up, and defining the production potential of the most rebellious of effects.

 

Alex U. Case has dedicated his professional life to the study of aesthetics, perception, signal processing, electro-acoustics and room acoustics for the creation and enjoyment of recorded music. An Associate Professor of Sound Recording Technology, Case leads classes, sessions and research with undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Massachusetts Lowell.

 

AES President-Elect and a Fellow of both the Audio Engineering Society and the Acoustical Society of America, Case is an engineer, educator, and author - for Focal Press, and lynda.com - who speaks frequently on audio and acoustics across the United States and worldwide. With degrees in Mechanical Engineering, Music, and Acoustics, Professor Case lives and works at the intersection of audio art and science.

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Posted: Wednesday, December 16, 2015

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Past Event: Revisiting the Legendary 1938 Benny Goodman Carnegie Hall Concert, or "The Greatest Broadcast That Never Happened"

October 6, 2015 at 7:00 pm

Location: The New School for Jazz Performance 5th floor?55 West 13 Street?between 5th & 6th Avenues New York, NY

Moderated by: Robert Auld, AuldWorks

Speaker(s): Vincent Pelote, Director of Operations, The Institute of Jazz Studies, Rutgers University; Seth B.Winner, President, Seth B. Winner Studios

Benny Goodman's January 16, 1938 concert in Carnegie Hall was one of the most important musical events of its era. It signified a major cultural shift, in which jazz was accepted as more than just entertainment played in "low" venues like brothels and speakeasy's.  The recording of the concert, first released in 1950, was an immediate hit and has never been out of the catalog since.  It is, simply, the largest selling jazz album of all time.

There have always been mysteries and misconceptions about how the concert was recorded and what source was used for the initial 1950 LP release.  Further, when Columbia reissued the concert on CD in the 1980's, it appeared that the original transcription disk recordings made in 1938 had been lost, so the first CD issue used the 1950 tapes.  In the 1990's, Phil Schaap, backed by the resources of Sony (who now owned the Columbia catalog), finally tracked down the original disks and produced a reissue from them in 1999.  That reissue was controversial, as many of the problems of reproducing 1930's era transcription disks were not dealt with as well as they might have been.  

So matters stood until recently, when Seth Winner, one of the most experienced historical transfer engineers around, came into possession of the original transcription disks.  At this AES New York section meeting Vincent Pelote and Mr. Winner will discuss the importance of this concert, the origins of this particular set of discs, and the problems that are present in this source as well as in all the previous re-masterings.  We will hear audio examples illustrating both the problems that are present and the digital techniques that can be used to restore the sound for possible future reissues. 


Posted: Monday, September 28, 2015

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