AES New York 2011
Broadcast and Media Streaming Session Details

 

Thursday, October 20, 9:00 am — 10:30 am (Room: 1E10)

B1 - Facility Design—Renovation and Retrofitting

Chair:
John Storyk, Walters-Storyk Design Group
Panelists:
Judy Elliot-Brown, Rocket Science, NY
John McGowan, Director of Audio Engineering WNET TV
Howie Schwartz, Howard Schwartz Recording Inc. - New York, NY, USA

Abstract:
There continues to be an increasing need for facility upgrade and expansion in the broadcast production and post-production sectors. Numerous technical and social issues are fueling this, including changing delivery and production protocols (i.e., HDTV, surround audio, etc.); improved economic times with respect to media content organization; etc. Typically, facilities have had to expand or improve their audio production rooms by retrofitting an existing room or installing a new room within an existing production complex. This panel will explore specific techniques as well as examples dealing with the construction and more specific acoustic and technology issues, associated with retrofitting and renovating audio production facilities with an eye toward broadcasting production and post production standards.

Thursday, October 20, 11:00 am — 12:30 pm (Room: 1E10)

B2 - Listener Fatigue and Retention

Chair:
David Wilson, CEA
Panelists:
Todd Baker, SRS Labs
Frank Foti, Omnia
Greg Monti, Citadel Media
Greg Ogonowski, Orban
Sean Olive, Harman
Ellyn Sheffield, Towson University

Abstract:
This panel will discuss listener fatigue and its impact on listener retention. While listener fatigue is an issue of interest to broadcasters, it is also an issue of interest to telecommunications service providers, consumer electronics manufacturers, music producers, and others. Fatigued listeners to a broadcast program may tune out, while fatigued listeners to a cell phone conversation may switch to another carrier, and fatigued listeners to a portable media player may purchase another company’s product. The experts on this panel will discuss their research and experiences with listener fatigue and its impact on listener retention.

Thursday, October 20, 4:30 pm — 6:00 pm (Room: 1E10)

B3 - Streaming with HTML5

Chair:
Valerie Tyler, College of San Mateo
Panelists:
Ian Bennett, Microsoft
Greg Ogonowski, Orban

Abstract:
HTML5 is a language for structuring and presenting content for the World Wide Web, a core technology of the Internet. It is the fifth revision of the HTML standard. HTML5 will have many features built into the code. One feature is the media player or how it will handle media being downloaded or streamed. This session will look into the technical considerations for media to be played back as well as the user interfaces.

Friday, October 21, 9:00 am — 10:30 am (Room: 1E10)

B4 - Audio Processing for Radio

Chair:
Steve Fluker, Cox Radio
Panelists:
Frank Foti, Omnia Audio
James J. Johnston, Consultant
Robert Orban, Orban
Randy Woods, WPOZ

Abstract:
There is much discussion as to why radio stations are “over-processed”—a term that is true or not depending on your point of view. This panel will be discussing audio processing in the radio environment. There will be a brief discussion of audio processing history, up to and including the advantages of using digital processors. And radio today is not just an analog medium—we will discuss do’s and don’ts for processing radio in the digital realm—and try taking a look into the future.

Friday, October 21, 11:00 am — 1:00 pm (Room: 1E11)

B5 - Streaming & Encoding

Chair:
David Bialik
Panelists:
Todd Baker, SRS Labs
Kirk Harnack, Telos Alliance
James Johnston, Consultant
Steve Lyman, Dolby
Jan Nordmann, Fraunhofer USA
Greg Ogonowski, Orban
Geir Skaaden, DTS, Inc.
William Waters, NewTek

Abstract:
This session will discuss various methods of streaming and encoding media and how it can best be delivered to the end user over various platforms.

Friday, October 21, 2:30 pm — 4:00 pm (Room: 1E10)

B6 - Television Loudness and Meta Data

Chair:
Skip Pizzi, NAB
Panelists:
Richard Cabot, Qualis Audio
Paul Keller, Harris Corp.
Steve Lyman, Dolby
Andrew Mason, BBC R&D
Stephan Schreiner, Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS
Rober Seidel, CBS

Abstract:
Digital television is now well established in the US market, where most analog TV broadcasting was eliminated in 2009. The ATSC DTV audio system includes numerous features not previously available, including the ability to normalize audio loudness at the receiver (via the AC-3 dialnorm metadata feature). This process has not been uniformly applied, however, causing numerous listener complaints that ultimately resulted in federal legislation mandating the matching of TV commercial and program audio loudness. This new law—the Commercial Audio Loudness Mitigation (CALM) Act—is expected to become effective in January 2013, and FCC rules are currently being crafted toward its implementation, with significant input from ATSC and the industry on how to best comply with the Act’s requirements. Learn the latest about controlling TV audio loudness and complying with the new mandates, from broadcasters, manufacturers, and vendors in this timely and important session.

Friday, October 21, 4:00 pm — 5:30 pm (Room: 1E10)

B7 - Audio Engineering Supporting People with Disabilities: A Workshop

Chair:
Eric Small, Modulation Sciences
Panelists:
Steve Lyman, Dolby
Alison Greenwald Neplokh, Chief Engineer, FCC Media Bureau
Joel Snyder, Audio Description Project, American Council of the Blind

Abstract:
On October 8, 2010, President Obama signed the Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act (CVAA) into law. The CVAA updates federal communications law to increase the access of persons with disabilities to modern communications and entertainment technology, including new digital, broadband, and mobile innovations. Since much of this law applies to the visually and hearing handicapped, it will create many challenges and opportunities for the audio engineering community. Graphic user interfaces must be made audible while audible interfaces must be made visual- and hearing aid-friendly. This workshop will explore CVAA from the viewpoint of an engineer and regulator who helped write the law and a creator of the content that implements one aspect of the law.

Friday, October 21, 7:30 pm — 9:00 pm

B8 - A Half Century of FM Stereo

Co-chairs:
David Bialik
Scott Fybush, Fybush.com / Inside Radio
Panelists:
Richard Burden
Frank Foti, Omnia Audio
Richard Mertz, Cavell and Mertz
Arno Meyer, Belar
Robert Orban, Orban
Skip Pizzi, NAB
Bill Sacks
Eric Small, Modulation Sciences
Jeff Smith, Clear Channel
Herb Squire

Abstract:
Radio's first four decades were strictly monophonic. Despite some early experimentation by FM inventor Edwin Howard Armstrong, even “high-fidelity” FM remained mono until 1961, when the FCC chose among competing systems to declare a standard for FM stereo broadcasting.

To celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the first commercial FM stereo broadcasts in the United States, this panel discussion will bring together some of the industry’s top broadcast engineers and equipment designers. Topics will include FM stereo’s birth, the merits of the competing systems that sought FCC approval, the initial technical challenges faced by the new medium, the development of high-density FM audio processing, and the future of analog FM stereo in an increasingly digital world.

This event is being organized by the NY Section of the AES and will be held in the PC Richard & Sons Theater at the Clear Channel Studios, 32 Avenue of the Americas. Seating is limited and tickets are required, although the event will also be streamed. You can read more information about tickets and how to watch the stream on this press release: http://www.aes.org/events/131/press/?ID=132

The Audio Engineering Society thanks Clear Channel Communications for providing the theater for this event.


For live streaming of this event please visit: http://www.ustream.tv/channel/aesny

To listen to an MP3 podcast of the presentation, please click here.

Saturday, October 22, 9:00 am — 10:30 am (Room: 1E11)

B9 - Sound Effects of the Witches of Lublin

Panelists:
Butch D'Ambrosio, SFX Artist
Sylvaana Pinto, SFX Artist
David Shinn, Master Engineer
Mark Wiener, SFX Artist
Sue Zizza, Director/Producer

Abstract:
This session will be presented in 3 parts:

a) Recording live effects—how we used our home and recorded late at night—see photos on the website in NEWS.

b) Recording a large cast all together and still maintaining isolation for intercuts and post editing

c) Recording live music—not as a studio production—all isolated—but as is.

Saturday, October 22, 11:00 am — 12:30 pm (Room: 1E10)

B10 - Backhaul in the Twenty-First Century

Chair:
Frank Bolognino, Modular Monolith Systems
Panelists:
Bruce Berensen, Sirius/XM
Kirk Harnack, Telos Alliance
Chris Tobin, Musicam USA

Abstract:
Backhaul, or “the Clean Feed,” is transmitting point-to-point to an individual television / radio station or broadcast network. In the IP world of the 21st Century, new digital codecs and cellular technology have changed the way broadcasters get their feeds back to Master Control.

Some of the items we will discuss include new hardware and software technologies; reliability; cost-effectiveness; compatibility; and latency, bandwidth, and network restriction issues.

The panel will also tell of some of their experiences in planning remotes, interfacing with I.T., and some of the live events they have done using these new technologies.

Saturday, October 22, 2:00 pm — 3:30 pm (Room: 1E10)

B11 - Lip Sync Issue

Chair:
Jonathan S. Abrams, Nutmeg Post
Panelists:
Aldo Cugnini
Adam Goldberg, AGP, LLC
Steve Lyman, Dolby
Jackson Wiegman, Evertz

Abstract:
Lip sync remains a complex problem, with several causes and few solutions. From production through transmission and reception, there are many points where lip sync can either be properly corrected or made even worse. This session’s panel will discuss several key issues. Where do the latency issues exist? How can the latency be measured? What correction techniques exist for controlled environments? How does video display design affect lip sync? Who is responsible for implementing the mechanisms that ensure lip sync is maintained when the signal reaches your television?

Join us as our panel addresses these questions and possible solutions.

Saturday, October 22, 3:30 pm — 5:00 pm

B12 - CANCELLED

Saturday, October 22, 5:00 pm — 6:30 pm (Room: 1E10)

B13 - Improving the Streaming Audience Experience

Chair:
Bill Sacks, Orban
Panelists:
Carl Edwards, Pandora
Steven Harris, BridgeCo (SMSC)
Rusty Hodge, SomaFM
Greg Ogonowski, Orban
Skip Pizzi, NAB

Abstract:
In today’s highly competitive digital media environment the listener/viewer is being presented with millions of choices. They have no patience for glitchy players or phasey sounding tin horn unprocessed audio that is overly dynamic for the medium. Marshall McLuhan said this best when he said "The medium is the message." Our audiences are now experiencing high quality audio on seamless players and if your stream is not one of these better quality streams, those fickle users will be lost forever with one bad experience.

Sunday, October 23, 9:00 am — 10:30 am (Room: 1E10)

B14 - Considerations for Facility Design

Chair:
John Storyk, Walters Storyk Design Group
Panelist:
Dirk Noy, Walters Storyk Design Group

Abstract:
Topics for discussion will include:

1. Pre-design: Translating your business plan into spaces and places. The right shapes for the creative workplace leasehold / building. Important Criteria for comparing potential leaseholds/buildings—Can you get there? Circulation & pathways for People, Stuff & Content; Is the structure & infrastructure ready for your business?; Can your workflow work there? An Essential Design Methodology: Due Diligence, Analysis, Concepts, Policy, Design, Manage, Realize. The Project Team: Who you need, how to hire and manage them. Budget & Schedule, every step of the way.

2. Design: Trends in the changing multi-media workplace. Simple techniques to manage acoustical and technical performance with minimum expense. The importance of coordination.

3. Purchasing: No need to re-invent any wheels—standard processes, contracts and business structures.

4. Construction Administration: Roles of Project Team members. Managing changes in scope and schedule. One place, seven contractors, one on-air date. 

5. Future Proofing… How to plan for upgrades, new developments in fiber optics and changes in production/post production formats and procedures. How evaluate new technology introductions, how to separate meaningful innovations from ‘smoke & mirror’ trends. 5.1 yes. 3D? Odorama? The jury may still be out.

Attendees will leave with a good overview of best practices, opportunities and pitfalls related to capital project development for the industries represented at AES.

Sunday, October 23, 11:00 am — 12:30 pm (Room: 1E10)

B15 - New Initiatives in Digital Audio Playback and Automation for Radio

Chair:
Paul McLane, Radio World
Panelists:
Don Backus, Enco
Hari Samrat, Broadcast Electronics
Brad Young, Wide Orbit
Jeff Zigler, RCS

Abstract:
As the line blurs between traditional radio and internet streaming, automation providers are exploring new technologies to serve broadcasters. From enhanced and simplified user interfaces to the ability to control a number of streams from a single workstation automatically, many initiatives are focused on the operator. Others, like running automation on virtualized hardware and increased utilization of cloud computing are focused on the engineering side. Learn how leading providers are addressing these and other issues to assist broadcasters in serving a rapidly changing market.

Sunday, October 23, 2:00 pm — 5:00 pm (Room: 1E03)

B17 - Society of Broadcast Engineers Exams

Abstract:
SBE exams will take place on October 23 at 2:00 pm during the annual AES convention. Applicants are encouraged to apply before the exams by going to www.sbe.org and accessing the certification applications. You may apply on-site for the Certified Broadcast Technologist or the Certified Broadcast Networking Technologist exams. If you wish to apply for the broadcast engineer, senior engineer or specialist certifications then you would need to pre- register by October 17. If you have any questions contact Megan Clappe, certification director at mclappe@sbe.org

Sunday, October 23, 2:30 pm — 4:00 pm (Room: 1E10)

B16 - Media File Management: Storage, Backup, and Retrieval of Your Assets

Chair:
David Prentice, Dale Pro Audio
Panelists:
Jim Boas, RorkeData–An Avenet Company
Tim Claman, Avid
Michael Gitig, Gobbler

Abstract:
How’s your media? Is it safe? Is it accessible?

Recording and production are rapidly moving into a file-based workflow with all the project materials—audio files, edits, plug-ins, automation, and video files—existing on spinning disks. During the project it’s necessary to keep track of the elements and after completion it’s vital to preserve all the work. But a project rarely remains untouched after submission so there is an increased need for media access and identification after the back-up to grab and re-purpose elements for a new job or revision. Our panel will discuss technologies including fiber, Ethernet, and cloud-based storage and retrieval for addressing the need to manage the exploding volume of media assets generated every day.


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