AES Student Blog

June 2012

AES 133: Design Competition Rules and Entry Form

Attention Student Design Engineers!
 

The complete rules and entry form for the 133rd Student Design Competition have been posted! Visit aes.org/students/awards/design to download your copy.

 

 

Like the Recording Competition, the Student Design Competition is a tremendous opportunity for current students and recent graduates* alike to compete for worldwide recognition with scholars from all over the globe. Start preparing your submission today!

 

 

*See complete rules for eligibility.


Posted: Thursday, June 21, 2012

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AES132 BUDAPEST | Student Recording Competition - The Prizes They Got (pt.4)

AES132 BUDAPEST | Student Recording Competition - The Prizes They Got (pt.4)

The Student Delegate Assembly wants to thank once again to our sponsors who helped us run Student Recording Competition on 132 Convention in Budapest and who kindly gave away great prizes to the competition winners.

This time we would like to thank D16 Group, who generously donated SilverLine Collection plug-in bundle, making it a prize for Yoann Saunier from Conservatoire de Paris and Daniel Meyer from Berlin Student Section, both winners of silver prizes in Category 3.

See a full list of the winners here.

SilverLine Collection plug-in bundle
contains all effect plug-ins from Silver Line family: Devastor (Multiband Distortion Unit), Fazortan (Controlable Space Phaser), Decimort (Bit Crusher), Redoptor (Vintage Tube Distortion), Toraverb (Space Modulated Reverb) and Syntorus (Double Path Analog Chorus).

Check out more pictures from the SRC in Budapest on our Facebook account and follow us on Twitter.

 

thank you D16


Posted: Sunday, June 17, 2012

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132nd Student Recording Competition — The Interviews, Part II

132nd Student Recording Competition — The Interviews, Part II

Interview with Simon Lindskog (University of Lulea-Pitea) – SILVER Category 1

 

SDA:   How long did you work on your competition entry? Was this your first entry?

     SL:     I worked for two whole days recording two different pieces and spent one late night editing them. After that, I listened to them a lot and decided which I was going to send as my entry. Yes, it was my first entry!
 

SDA:   Tell us about the production of your entry. Stories? Inspirations?

     SL:     I love Bach pieces, but have always wanted them to have a more percussive sound and a closer feel, like a cembalo (harpsichord) being played in someone’s house – the way I think the piece was played years ago. It might have been a bit risky, but it was really fun exploring new ways to record and listen. The pianist I was recording was going to submit the song with her application for the Sibelius Academy in Finland, so we worked really hard to capture her performance. She loved the sound!

 

SDA:   What initiated your passion for audio? When did it start?

     SL:     It started when I was about 11 or 12 years old. I plugged my dad’s electric guitar into his Cubase rig and just sat and recorded whatever sounds I could make. My dad walked in and burst out, “How do you know how that works?!” Later, I started recording ideas for my band and we tracked some songs in our garage. I was mixing for days, learning by trial and error.

 

SDA:   Funniest experience as an engineer so far?

     SL:     When I was running a TV-show rehearsal at the university, the show host went to the men's room without telling me, the wireless mic still attached to his jacket. I sat there wondering, “What is that sound?” After a few seconds, I realized what was being sent to the in-ears of the whole crew...

 

SDA:   Biggest mistake you made during a production?

     SL:     Fortunately, I haven't made many mistakes, not big ones anyway. Once, me and one of my classmates recorded a symphony orchestra playing Mozart’s requiem. We used two A/D converters together to fit all the channels, but they weren’t synched correctly so we had awful pops in half of the channels. Luckily, our main stereo channels were safe.

 

SDA:   Favorite frequency?

     SL:     Any frequency that’s in the right spot! If I have to pick one, I’d say about 4322.065 Hz or so.

 

SDA:   Favorite mic, outboard box, and plugin?

     SL:     Hmmm... Mic: Thuresson C402, I guess. Outboard box: UA 1176. Plugin: Waves API 560A.

 

SDA:   Best recording of all time?

     SL:     That’s a very good question. One of my all-time favorites is “A Day in the Life” by The Beatles.
 

SDA:   Do you play any instruments?

     SL:     Yes; I play the piano, guitar, bass, and I also sing.

 

SDA:   Any other hobbies?

     SL:     I like writing a lot. I exercise quite often, so I’ll guess that’s a hobby, too.

 

SDA:   The best part of the 132nd AES Convention?

     SL:     The Student Recording Competition, of course!

 

SDA:   The best thing about the AES organization?

     SL:     That it even exists! It is always inspiring knowing that there are others like me, and even a whole society!

 

SDA:  Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

  SL:     I see myself running a music studio in Sweden, where I write and record with inspiring artists and friends. I also want to freelance as a sound engineer for national television, and as a sound designer for films and games.


Posted: Monday, June 11, 2012

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AES132 BUDAPEST | Student Recording Competition - The Prizes They Got (pt.3)

AES132 BUDAPEST | Student Recording Competition - The Prizes They Got (pt.3)

The Student Delegate Assembly wants to thank once again our sponsors who helped to run the Student Recording Competition on 132 Convention in Budapest perfectly and who kindly gave away great prizes to the competition winners.

This time we would like to thank IGS Audio, who generously donated IGS Audio COOL MINER Channel Strip, making it a prize delivered to Konrad Glas from Vienna student section, Austria. Konrad won a gold award in Category 2 – Traditional Studio Recording.

See a full list of the winners here.


The COOL MINER Channel is built of two independent blocks. The first is a typical mic-line preamp and the other is a 1176 type transistor compressor. Both blocks are well-known, classical structures, also appearing as separate IGS Audio devices (NE71 preamp and Alter Comp).
IGS Audio is now one the most desired studio equipment brands in Poland and it is continuously expanding internationally.

Check out more pictures from the SRC in Budapest on our Facebook account and follow us on Twitter.

 

thank you IGS


Posted: Friday, June 8, 2012

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Student Design Competition, San Francisco, CA

The Student Design Competition is returning to the 133rd AES Convention
in San Francisco, October 26-29! Watch our promo video to learn more.

133 SDC


Posted: Wednesday, June 6, 2012

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AES132 BUDAPEST | Student Recording Competition - The Prizes They Got (pt.2)

AES132 BUDAPEST | Student Recording Competition - The Prizes They Got (pt.2)

Once again THANKS go to our sponsors for the Student Recording Competition, who kindly give away the prizes that finalists receive at the contest.

Now we'd like to say thank you once again to Audiotech Professional Studio Equipment, who generously donated a pair of CharterOak SP-1 Headphones, which went straight to category 4 gold-award winner Marta Olko from the Warsaw Student Section in Poland (full list of winners here).


Audiotech is a company distributing exclusively to Poland audio gear from brands such as Adam Audio, Brauner, Cartec, CharterOak, Cloud Microphones, Elysia, Empirical Labs, Focustire, KRK, Kush Audio, Novation, Pelonis, SSL, Sontronics, StudioLogic, TLAudio, Ultrasone, Variohm, and Vovox. Get more info
here.

 

Check out more pictures from the SRC in Budapest in our facebook account.

 

thank you audiotech

 


Posted: Sunday, June 3, 2012

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AES132 BUDAPEST | Student Recording Competition - The Prizes They Got (pt.1)

AES132 BUDAPEST | Student Recording Competition - The Prizes They Got (pt.1)

Once again THANKS go to our sponsors for the Student Recording Competition, who kindly give away the prizes that finalists receive at the contest.

This time around we'd like to thank New York-based Cockos Inc., who generously donated 12 licenses for the REAPER DAW software, making it a prize delivered to all 12 finalists at the AES132 Competition (full list of winners here).


REAPER is digital audio workstation software: a complete multitrack audio and MIDI recording, editing, processing, mixing, and mastering environment. Find more info
here.

 

Check out more pictures from the SRC in Budapest in our facebook account.

 

thank you reaper

 


Posted: Saturday, June 2, 2012

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