AES New York 2013
Workshop Details

Wednesday, October 16, 5:00 pm — 7:00 pm (Room 1E10)

W21 - Lies, Damn Lies, and Audio Gear Specs

Chair:
Ethan Winer, RealTraps - New Milford, CT, USA
Panelists:
Scott Dorsey, Williamsburg, VA, USA
David Moran, Boston Audio Society - Wayland, MA, USA
Mike Rivers, Gypsy Studio - Falls Church, VA, USA

Abstract:
The fidelity of audio devices is easily measured, yet vendors and magazine reviewers often omit important details. For example, a loudspeaker review will state the size of the woofer but not the low frequency cut-off. Or the cut-off frequency is given, but without stating how many dB down or the rate at which the response rolls off below that frequency. Or it will state distortion for the power amps in a powered monitor but not the distortion of the speakers themselves, which of course is what really matters. This workshop therefore defines a list of standards that manufacturers and reviewers should follow when describing the fidelity of audio products. It will also explain why measurements are a better way to assess fidelity than listening alone.

Excerpts from this workshop are available on YouTube.

 
 

Thursday, October 17, 9:00 am — 10:30 am (Room 1E11)

W1 - Applications of 3D Audio in Automotive

Chair:
Alan Trevena, Jaguar Land Rover - Gaydon, UK
Panelists:
Jean-Marc Jot, DTS, Inc. - Los Gatos, CA, USA
Andreas Silzle, Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS - Erlangen, Germany
Gilbert Soulodre, Camden Labs - Ottawa, ON, Canada
Bert Van Daele, Auro Technologies NV - Mol, Belgium

Abstract:
While there are a number of technologies aimed at improving the spatial rendering of recorded sounds in automobiles, few are offer the advantages and challenges as 3D surround. This workshop will explore theoretical applications; system configurations as well as limitations of 3D surround applications in automotive. Questions such as what is the reference experience, and how is a system evaluated will be addressed.

AES Technical Council This session is presented in association with the AES Technical Committee on Automotive Audio

 
 

Thursday, October 17, 10:30 am — 12:00 pm (Room 1E13)

W2 - FX Design Panel: Compression

Chair:
Alex Case, University of Massachusetts Lowell - Lowell, MA, USA
Panelists:
David Derr, Empirical Labs - Parsippany, NJ, USA
Dave Hill, Crane Song - Superior, WI, USA; Dave Hill Designs
Colin McDowell, McDSP - Sunnyvale, CA, USA

Abstract:
Meet the designers whose talents and philosophies are reflected in the products they create, driving sound quality, ease of use, reliability, price, and all the other attributes that motivate us to patch, click, and tweak their effects processors.

 
 

Thursday, October 17, 10:30 am — 12:30 pm (Room 1E14)

W3 - Acoustic Enhancements Systems—Implementations

Chair:
Ben Kok, SCENA acoustic consultants - Uden, The Netherlands
Panelists:
Steve Barbar, Lares Associates - Belmont, MA, USA
Peter Mapp, Peter Mapp Associates - Colchester, Essex, UK
Thomas Sporer, Fraunhofer Institute for Digital Media Technology IDMT - Ilmenau, Germany; Ilmenau University of Technology - Ilmenau, Germany
Takayuki Watanabe, Yamaha Corp. - Hamamatsu, Shizuoka, Japan
Wieslaw Woszczyk, McGill University - Montreal, QC, Canada
Diemer de Vries, RWTH Aachen University - Aachen, Germany; TU Delft - Delft, Netherlands

Abstract:
Acoustic enhancement systems offer the possibility to change the acoustics of a venue by electronic means. How this is achieved varies by the working principle and philosophy of the system implemented. In this workshop various researchers, consultants, and suppliers active in the field of enhancement systems will discuss working principles and implementations.

This workshop is in close relation with the tutorial on acoustic enhancement systems; people not yet too familiar with the applications and working principles of these systems are recommended to attend the tutorial before attending the workshop.

AES Technical Council This session is presented in association with the AES Technical Committee on Acoustics and Sound Reinforcement

 
 

Thursday, October 17, 11:00 am — 1:00 pm (Room 1E12)

W4 - Microphone Specifications—Believe it or Not

Chair:
Eddy B. Brixen, EBB-consult/DPA Microphones - Smorum, Denmark
Panelists:
Juergen Breitlow, Neumann - Berlin, Germany
Jackie Green, Audio-Technica U.S., Inc. - Stow, OH, USA
Bill Whitlock, Jensen Transformers, Inc. - Chatsworth, CA, USA; Whitlock Consulting - Oxnard, CA, USA
Helmut Wittek, SCHOEPS GmbH - Karlsruhe, Germany
Joerg Wuttke, Joerg Wuttke Consultancy - Pfinztal, Germany

Abstract:
There are lots and lots of microphones available to the audio engineer. The final choice is often made on the basis of experience or perhaps just habits. (Sometimes the mic is chosen because of the looks … .) Nevertheless, there is essential and very useful information to be found in the microphone specifications. This workshop will present the most important microphone specs and provide the attendees with up-to-date information on how these are obtained and understood. Each member of the panel—all related to industry top brands—will present one item from the spec sheet. The workshop takes a critical look on how specs are presented to the user, what to look for and what to expect. The workshop is organized by the AES Technical Committee on Microphones and Applications.

AES Technical Council This session is presented in association with the AES Technical Committee on Microphones and Applications

 
 

Thursday, October 17, 12:00 pm — 12:45 pm (Room 1E11)

W5 - Height Channels: Theory, Practice, and "Ears-On" Experience

Chair:
David Bowles, Swineshead Productions LLC - Berkeley, CA, USA
Panelists:
Paul Geluso, New York University - New York, NY, USA
Agnieszka Roginska, New York University - New York, NY, USA

Abstract:
Over the past century sound recording and reproduction has dealt with an increasing number of audio channels to simulate spatial dimensions via capturing horizontal axes in stereo and surround-sound. The next step in immersive audio is to move into the vertical dimension through height channel recording and reproduction. The members of this panel will discuss different recording techniques to capture height channels and whether this audio information can be integrated into conventional stereo and surround-sound recordings. Vital to this dialog is a clearer understanding via psychoacoustics of our hearing perception outside the horizontal planes: how this perception influences engineers’ choices in microphone technique and speaker placement. Last, post-production methods to create 3-D sonic imagery for recordings not originating in 3-D will be discussed. This workshop will be divided into two parts: a technical panel discussion at Javits Center, followed by playback sessions at the James Dolan Studios at New York University.

 
 

Thursday, October 17, 2:30 pm — 4:30 pm (Room 1E10)

W6 - Design and Usage of Anchors in Listening Tests for Audio Quality Evaluation

Chair:
Frederik Nagel, Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS - Erlangen, Germany; International Audio Laboratories - Erlangen, Germany
Panelists:
Schuyler Quackenbush, Audio Research Labs - Scotch Plains, USA
Francis Rumsey, Logophon Ltd. - Oxfordshire, UK
Thomas Sporer, Fraunhofer Institute for Digital Media Technology IDMT - Ilmenau, Germany; Ilmenau University of Technology - Ilmenau, Germany
Nick Zacharov, DELTA SenseLab - Iisalmi, Finland

Abstract:
Listening tests for the evaluation of audio or speech quality (like MUSHRA or P800) employ anchors in order to stabilize rating scales and facilitate comparison among testing sites. As coding technology progressed, traditional anchors (including band-limited or noisy signals) are no longer related to artifacts occurring in state-of-the art audio codecs. Expert listeners probably have an internal reference for basic audio quality that may allow them to evaluate audio quality even without any anchors in case of mono and two–channel stereo material. However, especially for newly emerging technologies (including multichannel audio) anchors could have a huge impact as many listeners are still building their internal reference scale.

We will discuss:
• How should anchors be created in order to exhibit typical artifacts of modern audio codecs?
• Is it possible to create anchors with an expected quality for a variety of different input material?
• Which features should anchors have that are used in multichannel testing?
• How important are anchors at all, compared to internal anchors and references of experts?
• What effect has modification of anchors to the results?

AES Technical Council This session is presented in association with the AES Technical Committee on Perception and Subjective Evaluation of Audio Signals

 
 

Thursday, October 17, 2:30 pm — 4:00 pm (Room 1E13)

W7 - Tools and Workflow for the Creation of Immersive Content

Chair:
Bert Van Daele, Auro Technologies NV - Mol, Belgium
Panelists:
Fred Maher, DTS Inc. - Calabasas, CA, USA
Jurgen Scharpf, Dolby - San Francisco, CA, USA
Wilfried Van Baelen, Auro Technologies - Mol, Belgium
Brian A. Vessa, Sony Pictures Entertainment - Culver City, CA, USA; Chair SMPTE 25CSS standards committee

Abstract:
In this workshop the requirements for new tools and workflows to create three-dimensional, immersive content are discussed. The panel members present their own solutions and discuss the creative possibilities as well as the requirements for compatibility between different systems and deliverables.

AES Technical Council This session is presented in association with the AES Technical Committee on Sound for Digital Cinema and Television

 
 

Thursday, October 17, 4:30 pm — 7:00 pm (Room 1E11)

W8 - Digital Room Correction—Does it Really Work?

Chair:
Bob Katz, Digital Domain Mastering - Orlando, FL, USA
Panelists:
Ulrich Brüggemann, AudioVero - Herzebrock, Germany
Michael Chafee, Michael Chafee Enterprises - Sarasota, FL, USA
Will Eggleston, Genelec Inc. - Natick, MA, USA
Curt Hoyt, 3D Audio Consultant - Huntington Beach, CA, USA; Trinnov Audio USA Operations
Floyd Toole, Acoustical consultant to Harman, ex. Harman VP Acoustical Engineering - Oak Park, CA, USA

Abstract:
The practice of digital room and loudspeaker correction (DRC) is an especially fruitful beneficiary of Moore's law and increased skills among DSP programmers. DRC is a hot topic of interest for recording, mixing and mastering engineers, and studio designers. The workshop will explore the principles of DRC with three panelists and an expert guest.

AES Technical Council This session is presented in association with the AES Technical Committee on Acoustics and Sound Reinforcement and AES Technical Committee on Recording Technology and Practices

 
 

Thursday, October 17, 5:00 pm — 6:30 pm (Room 1E14)

W9 - Can We Measure Emotions?

Chair:
Judith Liebetrau, Ilmenau University of Technology - Ilmenau, Germany; Fraunhofer Institute for Digital Media Technology IDMT - Ilmenau, Germany
Panelists:
Frederik Nagel, Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS - Erlangen, Germany; International Audio Laboratories - Erlangen, Germany
Mark B. Sandler, Queen Mary University of London - London, UK
Chia-Jung Tsay, University College London - London, UK

Abstract:
Music evokes and carries emotions. Music emotion recognition (MER), as a part of music information retrieval (MIR), examines the question: Which parts of music evoke what emotions and how can they be automatically classified? Classification systems need to be trained in terms of feature selection and prediction. As training data, musical pieces of which the average emotional impact is known have to be used. Due to the subjectivity of emotions, the generation of such ground truth data poses several challenges. In this workshop obstacles in measuring and automatically predicting emotions evoked by music will be displayed.

Among others, the workshop will address the following topics: What is an emotion and how can it be defined? Is there a difference between felt and perceived emotion? Can the emotional impact of a musical piece be subjectively measured? Can the emotional impact of a musical piece be predicted?

AES Technical Council This session is presented in association with the AES Technical Committee on Perception and Subjective Evaluation of Audio Signals

 
 

Friday, October 18, 9:00 am — 10:30 am (Room 1E10)

W10 - National Recording Preservation Plan: Best Practices for Creating and Preserving Born-Digital Audio Files

Chair:
Konrad Strauss, Indiana University - Bloomington, IN, USA
Panelists:
Chris Lacinak, AVPreserve - New York, NY, USA
George Massenburg, Schulich School of Music, McGill University - Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Charles Van Winkle, Adobe - Minneapolis, MN, USA

Abstract:
In December of 2012 the Library of Congress released the National Recording Preservation Plan. The result of nearly 10 years of work by the Library and the National Recording Preservation Board, the Plan outlines a series of recommendations for implementing a national recorded sound preservation plan. This workshop will explore recommendations 2.7: Best Practices for Creating and Preserving Born-Digital Audio Files, and 2.6: Tools to Support Preservation throughout the Content Life Cycle; and will focus on best practices for the creation of born-digital recordings and strategies for short-term backup and long-term preservation.

AES Technical Council This session is presented in association with the AES Technical Committee on Archiving Restoration and Digital Libraries

 
 

Friday, October 18, 10:30 am — 12:30 pm (Room 1E08)

W11 - Audio Source Separation

Chair:
Gautham Mysore, Adobe Research - San Francisco, CA, USA
Panelists:
Nicholas Bryan, Stanford University - Stanford, CA, USA
Derry FitzGerald, Cork Institute of Technology - Cork, Ireland
Elias Kokkinis, accusonus - Patras, Greece
Pierre Leveau, Audionamix - Paris, France

Abstract:
Audio source separation algorithms aim to take a recording of a mixture of sound sources as an input and provide the separated sources as outputs. Algorithmically, this is a very challenging problem. However, some recent technological advances have made this possible for multiple real world scenarios such as denoising in the presence of complex noises, pitch correcting certain notes while preserving others, processing only the vocals of a song while preserving the background music, extracting dialogue from old films to provide a higher quality soundtrack, removing microphone leakage from multichannel drum recordings, upmixing mono to stereo with panning of sound sources, and more generally, music remixing. Some of these technologies are available in products (Adobe Audition CC, Melodyne, ISSE, ADX Trax, Drumatom). Others are used by specialized sound engineers and are offered as a service (Audionamix, Derry Fitzgerald). This panel is comprised of some of the inventors of these technologies, who will discuss the ideas and their practical use.

AES Technical Council This session is presented in association with the AES Technical Committee on Semantic Audio Analysis

 
 

Friday, October 18, 10:30 am — 12:00 pm (Room 1E13)

W12 - FX Design Panel: Equalization

Chair:
Francis Rumsey, Logophon Ltd. - Oxfordshire, UK
Panelists:
Nir Averbuch, Sound Radix Ltd. - Israel
George Massenburg, Schulich School of Music, McGill University - Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Saul Walker, New York University - New York, NY, USA

Abstract:
Meet the designers whose talents and philosophies are reflected in the products they create, driving sound quality, ease of use, reliability, price, and all the other attributes that motivate us to patch, click and tweak their effects processors.

 
 

Friday, October 18, 12:00 pm — 1:00 pm (Room 1E13)

W13 - Microphone and Recording Techniques for the Music Ensembles of the United States Military Academy

Chair:
Brandie Lane, United States Military Academy Band - West Point, NY, USA
Panelist:
Joseph Skinner, United States Army, West Point Band - West Point, NY, USA

Abstract:
The United States Military Academy is home to the oldest active duty military band. Our mission is to provide world-class music to educate, train, and inspire the Corps of Cadets and to serve as ambassadors of the United States Military Academy to the local, national, and international communities. This workshop will discuss advanced microphone and recording techniques (stereo and multi-track) used to capture the different elements of the West Point Band including the Concert Band, Jazz Knights, and Field Music group in a recording/studio or live sound reinforcement setting. The recording of other USMA musical elements including the Cadet Glee Club and Cadet Pipes and Drums will also be discussed.

 
 

Friday, October 18, 2:00 pm — 3:30 pm (Room 1E14)

W14 - The Timeline Never Lies: Audio Engineers Aiding Forensic Investigators in Cases of Suspected Music Piracy

Chair:
Martha de Francisco, McGill University - Montreal, QC, Canada
Panelists:
Cynthia Arato, Shapiro, Arato & Isserles - New York, NY, USA
Joe Bennett, Bath Spa University - Bath, UK
Thomas Owen, Owen Forensic Services - Colonia, NJ, USA

Abstract:
Technological evolution in the music world has lead to a heightened threat of illegal copying of music performances. Based upon their professional practice audio engineers are being consulted by repertoire owners and their lawyers in cases of suspected music piracy. The expert witnesses develop systematic approaches to obtaining proof of authenticity of the music material based on their professional expertise in analytical listening of the recorded sound and in studio production tools and techniques as well as on their ability to evaluate minute details of the music performance. Their findings may lead the courts to uncover dubious practices of falsification and subsequent release of copyrighted music files.

A musicologist, a recording engineer/producer, a forensic audio specialist, and a litigation attorney present and discuss aspects of forensic audio and intellectual property.

AES Technical Council This session is presented in association with the AES Technical Committee on Audio Forensics

 
 

Friday, October 18, 6:30 pm — 8:00 pm (Room 1E11)

W15 - Sex, Lies, and Surroundtapes—What Happened to All the Fun in the World?

Chair:
Florian Camerer, ORF - Austrian TV - Vienna, Austria; EBU - European Broadcasting Union
Panelists:
Ronald Prent, Wisseloord Studios - Eemnes, Netherlands
Bosse Ternstrom, Swedish Radio

Abstract:
Surround Sound is again rising—literally, as height channels appear and immerse the listener in three dimensions. But what about good ol' 5.1? Have we mastered it to the point where we are in desperate need for new challenges? Two nostalgic veterans of 5.1, Bosse Ternstrom from Swedish Radio and Florian Camerer from Austrian TV, will play their “20 golden 5.1 hits” and muse about the sex appeal of the tracks as well as slay some potential dragons and lies (LFE! :-))... Come by for an evening listening session to heighten your senses—and also to enjoy some of the great mixes of Maestro George Massenburg, presented by the man himself!

 
 

Saturday, October 19, 10:30 am — 12:00 pm (Room 1E13)

W16 - FX Design Panel: Distortion

Chair:
Jan Berg, Luleå University of Technology - Piteå, Sweden
Panelists:
Ken Bogdanowicz, SoundToys - Burlington, VT, USA
Marc Gallo, Studio Devil Virtual Tube Amplification - New York, NY, USA
Aaron Wishnick, iZotope - Somerville, MA, USA

Abstract:
Meet the designers whose talents and philosophies are reflected in the products they create, driving sound quality, ease of use, reliability, price, and all the other attributes that motivate us to patch, click, and tweak their effects processors.

 
 

Saturday, October 19, 11:30 am — 1:00 pm (Room 1E08)

W17 - How Are We Learning Mastering: Teaching Mastering—The Next Wave

Chair:
Jonathan Wyner, Berklee College of Music - Boston, MA, USA; M Works Mastering
Panelists:
Scott Hull, Masterdisk - New York, NY, USA
Mike Wells, Mike Wells Mastering - Los Angeles, CA, USA

Abstract:
Traditionally mastering has been learned by apprenticing. Now with the proliferation of educational resources and the evolution of affordable high quality in-the-box processing, more people are practicing mastering in more places than ever before. Teaching a young engineer to become a top flight mastering engineer can be challenging.

Have you wondered: What does "Experienced Mastering Engineer" mean? What's the secret of mastering? In this workshop seasoned mastering engineers and educators discuss how the craft is being taught and learned and how the next generation of mastering engineers will learn from their contemporaries. Topics will include what time tested practices remain essential and what is new in the discipline of mastering.

Attendees of this workshop will walk away with a clearer understanding of what it takes to thrive in today's mastering market, how to assess internship/mentorship over "going solo" early in a mastering career, and how to grow/build your mastering skills in today's market.

AES Technical Council This session is presented in association with the AES Technical Committee on Recording Technology and Practices

 
 

Saturday, October 19, 12:00 pm — 5:00 pm

Workshops with Height at NYU

Chair:
Paul Geluso, New York University - New York, NY, USA
Panelists:
Malgorzata Albinska-Frank, Tonstudio arton, Das Tonstudio für klassische Musik - Basel, Switzerland
Tom Ammermann, New Audio Technology GmbH - Hamburg, Germany
Tom Beyer
David Bowles, Swineshead Productions LLC - Berkeley, CA, USA
Jonathan Hong
Morten Lindberg, 2L (Lindberg Lyd AS) - Oslo, Norway
Lasse Nipkow, Silent Work GmbH - Zurich, Switzerland
Agnieszka Roginska, New York University - New York, NY, USA
Bert Van Daele, Auro Technologies NV - Mol, Belgium
Gregor Zielinsky, Sennheiser Electronic GmbH & Co. KG - Germany

Abstract:
The Music Technology program at NYU Steinhardt will host a multi-presentation 3D audio listening session. Visitors will experience music, film sound, live concert, and environmental sound recordings produced specifically for 3D listening environments. There will be 10 concurrent demo sessions at the NYU Steinhardt studios. In the James L. Dolan Music Recording Studio control room, recordings made by the faculty and students of NYU Music Technology and McGill University will be presented in 3D on a 10.2 speaker system. In the studio live room, music and film/video sound tracks created specifically for AURO 3D will be presented in 9.1 and discussed by the creators of the content. In the NYU Sound Research Lab, environmental sound captured at many locations around NYC using Ambisonic recording techniques as part of the Center for Urban Science and Progress (CUSP) research project will be presented on a 16.2 speaker system. In addition, a Telematic music performance featuring musicians at NYU and at a remote site will be taking place live. Viewers will be immersed in the sound from the remote location mixed with the sound of the on-site live musicians.
Demo Sessions:
• 12:30-1:10 : Immersive Sound - Bert Van Daele
• 1:00-1:45 : Telematic Concert - Tom Beyer
• 1:15-1:50 : David Bowie worldwide exhibition - Gregor
• 1:50-2:40 : Recording With Height - David Bowles and Paul Geluso
• 1:55-2:30 : Alps in 3D - Malgorzata Albinska-Frank
• 2:35-3:10 : Sound of the Future - Tom Ammerman
• 2:45-3:35 : NYC Sounds -­ Agnieszka Roginska
• 3:15-3:50 : Properies of Auro 3D - Lasse Nipkow
• 3:40-4:30 : Mixing With Space Builder - Jonathan Hong
• 3:55-4:30 : Berstien in 3D -­ Gregor Zielinsky
• 4:30-5:00 : Morten Lindberg

This event has a limited capacity. Tickets will be allocated on a first-come first-served basis. To participate, please sign up at the AES Tours Desk.

 
 

Saturday, October 19, 12:30 pm — 1:30 pm (Room 1E09)

W18 - The Cloud-Connected Future of Media Creation

Chair:
Jay LeBoeuf, iZotope - San Francisco, CA
Panelists:
Tristan Jehan, The Echo Nest - Somerville, MA, USA
Chris Kantrowitz, Gobbler - Hollywood, CA, USA
Charles Van Winkle, Adobe - Minneapolis, MN, USA

Abstract:
Thanks to a world full of mobile devices, innovative algorithms, and cloud computing, we are seeing a massive democratization of the media creation and production process. Innovative mobile applications, web services, and cloud-based audio sharing sites are turning virtually everyone into a content producer. In this session leading commercial technologists will debate the future. We will discuss quantitative and qualitative trends and the obstacles to media creation in the cloud.

AES Technical Council This session is presented in association with the AES Technical Committee on Semantic Audio Analysis

 
 

Saturday, October 19, 3:00 pm — 5:00 pm (Room 1E13)

W19 - "Help! I Have a Tape Recorder!"—Restoration and Rebuilding Analog Tape Machines

Chair:
Noah Simon, New York University - New York, NY, USA
Panelists:
John French, JRF Magnetic Sciences Inc - Greendell, NJ, USA
Bob Shuster, Shuster Sound - Smithtown, NY USA
Daniel Zellman, Zeltec Service Labs - New York, NY, USA; Zeltec Research & Development

Abstract:
A new generation of engineers, musicians, and audiophiles are discovering how the analog recorders from the “good old days” are helping them get a better sound or get that “analog sound” into their recordings. At the same time at the other end, archivists, preservationists, remastering engineers, and high end audiophiles need to know what’s involved in taking care of these machines. This workshop will discuss the various options for these folks when they look for purchasing, maintaining, restoring, and using these recorders. During the workshop discussion, we hope to show examples of tape recorder repairs and restoration and have a running Q&A session.

AES Technical Council This session is presented in association with the AES Technical Committee on Archiving Restoration and Digital Libraries

 
 

Saturday, October 19, 5:00 pm — 7:30 pm (Room 1E13)

W20 - What's Right and What's Wrong with Today's Motion Picture Sound?

Chair:
John F. Allen, High Performance Stereo - Newton, Massachusetts USA
Panelists:
Mark Collins, Marcus Theatres - Milwaukee, WI, USA
Douglas Greenfield, Dolby Labs - Burbank, CA, USA
Brian A. Vessa, Sony Pictures Entertainment - Culver City, CA, USA; Chair SMPTE 25CSS standards committee

Abstract:
Do you think movies are too loud? Do you admire their sound quality? Why do so many complain about motion picture sound? The answers may come as a surprise. To fully understand the complexities involved, one must separately explore both the way movies are made and they way they are played.

This workshop consists of a panel of experts that actually work in both creating and presenting motion pictures. Their candid presentations will begin by exploring the often inaccurate way sound system measurements are interpreted. Complicating matters, the resulting equalization errors are different for different parts of the audio spectrum. Theater sound system mis-calibration errors cannot only diminish the sound quality but can cause significant unintended playback level increases as well. This presentation will not only describe these problems but will offer solutions as well.

These and other issues are the focus of the recent standards work. The obstacles presented when sometimes working at the limits of technology will be described by a senior studio sound engineer who is also the chairman of the largest SMPTE committee assigned to motion picture sound.

Movies mixed all over the world must be created with such consistency that they can all be played in a theater without the need to adjust a fader or an equalizer. Perhaps no part of the audio production industry is closer to achieving this goal than motion pictures. This demands hours of work and many long days often diplomatically supporting movie makers and assisting them in building the final product they are striving to create. One of our panelists in a leader in this rather exclusive field.

After years in the making of a film, it all comes down to theatrical presentation. Building and maintaining hundreds and even thousands of screens is an art in itself, often executed with mixed results. One of exhibitions most accomplished technical directors will detail the day to day challenges one faces in such a role.

 
 

Saturday, October 19, 5:00 pm — 7:00 pm (Room 1E14)

W22 - Loudness Wars: Leave Those Peaks Alone

Chair:
Thomas Lund, TC Electronic A/S - Risskov, Denmark
Panelists:
John Atkinson
Florian Camerer, ORF - Austrian TV - Vienna, Austria; EBU - European Broadcasting Union
Bob Ludwig, Gateway Mastering Studios, Inc. - Portland, ME, USA
George Massenburg, Schulich School of Music, McGill University - Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Susan Rogers

Abstract:
Music production, distribution, and consumption has been caught in a vicious spiral rendering two decades of our music heritage damaged. Because of irreversible dynamics processing and data reduction from production onwards, new tracks and remastered ones typically sound worse than what could even be expected from compact cassette. However, with Apple, WiMP, and Spotify now engaged in a competition on quality, and FM radio in Europe adopting EBU R128 loudness normalization, limbo-practice is finally losing its grip on distribution.

The panel uses terms "Peak to Loudness Ratio" (PLR) and "Headroom" to analyze recorded music fidelity over the past 50 years from four different angles: physiological, production, distribution, and consumption. In the new realm, it's futile to master music louder than –16 LKFS.

 
 

Sunday, October 20, 9:00 am — 10:30 am (Room 1E12)

W23 - Classic Speech Intelligibility at the Royal Danish Theatre

Chair:
Jan Voetmann, Voetmann-Akustik - Frederiksberg C, Denmark; Danish Sound Innovation Network
Panelists:
Eddy B. Brixen, EBB-consult/DPA Microphones - Smorum, Denmark
Karsten Wolstad, Royal Danish Theatre Dramahouse; Danish National School of Performing Arts

Abstract:
Speech intelligibility tests are crucial for evaluating the acoustic quality of performing theaters, cinemas, and auditoriums. But also for PA systems in churches, railway stations, etc. The new grand auditorium of the Royal Danish Theatre in Copenhagen has shown some interesting differences in the subjective perceived speech quality at different seats. In order to analyze the situation a “classical” speech intelligibility test, reading nonsense words buried in standard sentences, was conducted alongside objective STI measurements.

The workshop will present the result of this unique and rare test situation, and discussions with the audience will hopefully lead to important improvements before the final project is launched.

This research project is supported by the Danish Sound Innovation
Network ("Danish Sound"). Danish Sound's primary services are innovation projects, matchmaking, networking, knowledge dissemination and globalization activities.

AES Technical Council This session is presented in association with the AES Technical Committee on Acoustics and Sound Reinforcement

 
 

Sunday, October 20, 9:00 am — 10:30 am (Room 1E11)

W24 - DSD vs. DXD: Extreme DSD and PCM Resolutions Compared

Chair:
Dominique Brulhart, Merging Technologies
Panelists:
Morten Lindberg, 2L (Lindberg Lyd AS) - Oslo, Norway
John Newton, Soundmirror, Inc. - Jamaica Plain, MA, USA

Abstract:
With the recent release of 11.2 MHz Quad-DSD production tools, more than a decade of DSD and DXD productions and the rapidly growing availability of DSD and DXD material available for download on the market, there is a constant debate in both the professional and the audiophile sector about the difference between DSD and PCM and ultimately which one “sounds better.” This panel would like offering the opportunity to two known specialists of these formats, John Newton from Soundmirror and Morten Lindberg from 2L, to present some of their recordings and discuss about their experience making productions in DSD and DXD. Recent recordings in 11.2 MHz DSD, DSD, and DXD will be presented and recording, editing, mixing, and mastering techniques and considerations using DSD and DXD will be discussed and compared.

 
 

Sunday, October 20, 9:00 am — 10:30 am (Room 1E14)

W25 - Audio @ The Near Speed of Light with Fiber Optics

Chair:
Ronald Ajemian, Owl Fiber Optics - Flushing, NY, USA
Panelists:
Marc Brunke, Optocore GmbH - Grafelfing, Germany
Steve Lampen, Belden - San Francisco, CA, USA
Fred Morgenstern, Neutrik USA
Warren Osse, Applications/Senior Design Engineer, Vistacom, Inc. - Allentown, PA, USA

Abstract:
As the growth of audio/video integrates and increases, so does the demand for more fiber optic technology. Sending, receiving, and storing a good quality audio/video data file is crucial in many areas of our industry. The workshop panel will address the audience to educate, inform, and update by having a question and answer format. Everyone who attends this workshop will walk away with more knowledge to be better prepared on existing and future use of fiber optic technology as it pertains to professional audio/video.

AES Technical Council This session is presented in association with the AES Technical Committee on Fiber Optics for Audio

 
 

Sunday, October 20, 10:30 am — 12:00 pm (Room 1E13)

W26 - FX Design Panel: Reverb

Chair:
Joshua D. Reiss, Queen Mary University of London - London, UK
Panelists:
Michael Carnes, Exponential Audio - Cottonwood Heights, UT, USA
Casey Dowdell, Bricasti

Abstract:
Meet the designers whose talents and philosophies are reflected in the products they create, driving sound quality, ease of use, reliability, price, and all the other attributes that motivate us to patch, click, and tweak their effects processors.

 
 

Sunday, October 20, 11:00 am — 12:30 pm (Room 1E10)

W27 - DSP Studio Monitoring

Chair:
Dave Malekpour, Professional Audio Design Inc. - Pembroke, MA, USA; Augspurger Monitors
Panelists:
Michael Blackmer, Professional Audio Design
David Kotch, Criterion Acoustics
Andrew Munro, Munro Acoustics, Dynaudio Acoustics - London, UK
Carl Nappa, Extreme Institute by Nelly - Saint Louis, MO, USA
Paul Stewart, Genelec

Abstract:
Monitoring systems have evolved over the last decade to include DSP systems for both room correction and system voicing. We will explore how this affects the listening environment for control rooms, mastering, and critical listening environments. We will examine room measurements, and correction curves employed with subsequent results. The panelists will discuss their experiences and show real world examples of how this has worked and not worked in applications.

We will look at how this impacts the users listening environment for accuracy and sonic quality. We will also explore how it affects studio design and how it is implemented by manufacturers to get the results they want from the speaker design.

 
 

Sunday, October 20, 12:30 pm — 1:30 pm (Room 1E11)

W28 - Practical Techniques for Recording Ambience in Surround

Chair:
Helmut Wittek, SCHOEPS GmbH - Karlsruhe, Germany
Panelist:
Michael Williams, Sounds of Scotland - Le Perreux sur Marne, France

Abstract:
In this workshop microphone recording techniques for ambience in 5.1 Surround are presented and discussed in theory and practice. Various simultaneous recordings were done in preparation of the workshop.
Theses audio samples from 6 different techniques in 5 different venues are perfectly suitable for demonstrating the principal differences between the techniques and the perceptual consequences on immersion, localization, sound color, stability, etc. The differences are not only valid for ambience and for 5.1 Surround as they show the basic differences between level/time difference stereophony and as they confirm theories on correlation between channels and their consequence for the perceived spatial image.

During the workshop, the audio samples are compared in an A/B manner and differences are discussed. The audio samples as well as the full documentation can be downloaded for free use on www.hauptmikrofon.de. They are particularly useful in education but also for sound engineers which have to choose an ambience setup in practice.

 
 

Sunday, October 20, 1:00 pm — 3:00 pm (Room 1E08)

W29 - Miking for PA

Chair:
Eddy B. Brixen, EBB-consult/DPA Microphones - Smorum, Denmark
Panelists:
Giacomo De Caterini, Casale Bauer - Rome, Italy; Accademia di Santa Cecilia
Henrik Kjelin, Complete Vocal Institute - Copenhagen, Denmark
Cathrine Sadolin, Complete Vocal Institute - Copenhagen, Denmark
Nevin Steinberg, Nevin Steinberg Sound Design - New York, NY, USA

Abstract:
Miking for PA is a very important task. Providing amplification to the spoken voice or the acoustical music instrument requires good knowledge about the sound source, about the PA-system, about the monitoring system—and about the microphones. This workshop takes you through some of the important issues and decisions when selecting the microphone with regards to peak level capacity, sensitivity, directivity, frequency response, sensitivity, etc. Getting balance, getting definition, getting the right timbre or “sound”—and still avoiding acoustical feedback, that’s the thing. Recognized engineers and sound designers will generously share their experiences from their work on the stages. Warning: Some of the attendees may pick up ideas that will change their habits forever…

AES Technical Council This session is presented in association with the AES Technical Committee on Microphones and Applications

 
 

Sunday, October 20, 2:30 pm — 4:00 pm (Room 1E14)

W30 - Mastering Our Future Music

Chair:
Rob Toulson, Anglia Ruskin University - Cambridge, UK
Panelists:
Mandy Parnell, Black Saloon Studios - London, UK
Michael Romanowski, Michael Romanowski Mastering - San Francisco, CA, USA; Owner Coast Recorders
Jonathan Shakhovskoy, Script - London, UK

Abstract:
Emerging technologies are impacting the way in which music is captured, packaged, and delivered to the listener. Communications and working practices are evolving, bringing new challenges and opportunities for producing a high quality final product. Technical initiatives including mastering for iTunes, high resolution playback, dynamic range control, and advances in metadata require mastering engineers to continuously modernize their methods. Additionally, the methods and systems for music delivery are evolving, with artists exploring new avenues for engaging their audience. In particular the “Album App” format has been considered with regard to high resolution audio, secure digital content, and the inclusion of album artwork and interactive features. Each of these contemporary initiatives has an impact on the way the audio is mastered and finalized.

AES Technical Council This session is presented in association with the AES Technical Committee on Recording Technology and Practices

 
 

Sunday, October 20, 2:30 pm — 4:00 pm (Room 1E13)

W31 - Beam Steering Loudspeakers and Line Arrays

Chair:
Peter Mapp, Peter Mapp Associates - Colchester, Essex, UK
Panelists:
Stefan Feistel, AFMG Technologies GmbH - Berlin, Germany
Ralph Heinz, Renkus-Heinz, Inc. - Foothill Ranch, CA, USA
Philippe Robineau, Tannoy - Coatbridge, Scotland, UK
Evert Start, Duran Audio - Zaltbommel, Netherlands
Ambrose Thompson, Martin Audio - High Wycombe, UK

Abstract:
Beam Steered Line Arrays have been commercially available for more than 15 years. Although originally intended for and restricted to speech applications, in the last few years, full range music systems have also started to enter the market. This tutorial will discuss the technology behind the systems, their application, and potential limitations. The panel members all have a wide experience of the steered arrays and so are able to cover all aspects of their design and application. The workshop will include a number of case histories and aims to get anyone not familiar with the technology up to speed as well as providing experienced users with some answers to long standing questions.

AES Technical Council This session is presented in association with the AES Technical Committee on Acoustics and Sound Reinforcement

 
 


Return to Workshops

EXHIBITION HOURS October 18th 10am – 6pm October 19th 10am – 6pm October 20th 10am – 4pm
REGISTRATION DESK October 16th 3pm – 7pm October 17th 8am – 6pm October 18th 8am – 6pm October 19th 8am – 6pm October 20th 8am – 4pm
TECHNICAL PROGRAM October 17th 9am – 7pm October 18th 9am – 7pm October 19th 9am – 7pm October 20th 9am – 6pm
AES - Audio Engineering Society