AES New York 2013
Project Studio Expo Session Details

Friday, October 18, 11:00 am — 12:00 pm (Stage)

It Won't Sound Right If You Don't Hear It Right: Studio Acoustics, Monitoring & Critical Listening

Presenters:
Hugh Robjohns, Technical Editor, Sound on Sound - Cambridge, UK
Paul White

Abstract:
The monitoring environment acoustics and the monitoring loudspeakers are critical links in every music production chain. Any weaknesses impact negatively not only on the overall quality of mixes but also on the confidence and ability of the user to assess and process audio material efficiently and effectively. This workshop examines the theoretical requirements and practical optimization of high-quality monitoring systems for home and project studios, drawing on the author’s experiences in the “Studio SOS” series published in Sound On Sound magazine. It will also explore choosing new monitoring loudspeakers, optimizing control room acoustics, and honing critical listening skills.

 
 

Friday, October 18, 12:00 pm — 1:00 pm (Stage)

Total Tracking: Get it Right at Source

Presenters:
Bill Gibson, Hal Leonard Performing Arts Publishing Group - Seattle, WA, USA; Berklee College of Music Online
Paul White

Abstract:
Everyone wants to record and produce music that’s successful! Although the secret to releasing a hit is multi-fold, the entire creative and technical process is doomed without two indispensable assets: well-recorded tracks and finely crafted musical components. This session focuses closely on methods for miking, processing, and capturing excellent sounds that require little or no manipulation during mixdown. Covered at the same time are considerations and techniques for establishing a solid musical foundation, resulting in a recording that nearly mixes itself because the mix ingredients are crafted to compliment each other while building power through intelligent combinations. Record better music more quickly and easily by getting it right at the source!

 
 

Friday, October 18, 1:00 pm — 2:00 pm (Stage)

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Mixing Secrets: Production Tricks to Use with any DAW

Presenter:
Mike Senior, Sound On Sound - Munich, Germany; Cambridge Music Technology

Abstract:
Affordable DAW software now provides all the processing tools you need to create commercially competitive music mixes within a home, college, or project studio. As such, the overriding concern for budget-conscious engineers these days should be to develop effective habits with regard to studio monitoring, mix balancing, and quality control. Important techniques in each of these three areas are often neglected in small-scale productions, leading to mixes that don't stack up against professional releases, or that collapse on some mass-market listening systems. In this seminar Sound On Sound magazine's "Mix Rescue" columnist Mike Senior will draw on his experience of thousands of project-studio mixes to highlight the most frequently overlooked studio tricks. In the process he'll demonstrate how these methods can powerfully upgrade your sonics without breaking the bank, no matter which DAW you're using.

 
 

Friday, October 18, 2:00 pm — 3:00 pm (Stage)

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Modular Synthesizers: Creative Uses in the Studio

Presenter:
Gino Robair

Abstract:
Modular synthesizers continue to grow in popularity, but not just with instrumentalists. Increases in sound quality and product reliability over the last 15 years, along with a jump in processing power thanks to analog/digital hybridization in circuit designs, have resulted in an increased use of modular systems in a production capacity while tracking and mixing. In this workshop, Electronic Musician magazine's Technical Editor, Gino Robair will demonstrate how producers and engineers take advantage of voltage controllable hardware systems in the modern studio utilizing DAWs, MIDI, and specialized tools such as MOTU Volta and Expert Sleepers Silent Way.

 
 

Friday, October 18, 3:00 pm — 4:00 pm (Stage)

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Master Your Tracks: DIY Results to Compete with the Pros

Presenter:
Craig Anderton, Harmony Central / Electronic Musician - Santa Fe, NM, USA

Abstract:
Mastering is the final step prior to duplication, and as such, represents the last opportunity to make any final tweaks to a piece of music for highest sonic quality—and maximum transportability among playback systems. Traditionally, musicians have used professional mastering engineers in order to take advantage of their experience and ears, but in today’s tight economy—and with the advent of tools that allow for “do-it-yourself” mastering—many musicians are choosing to do their own mastering. This workshop describes the pitfalls and advantages of “project mastering” as well as the main mistakes to avoid but primarily emphasizes practical techniques that can bring out the very best in a piece of music. It also covers the process of album assembly and how to make sure the music in a collection or album provides a smooth, cohesive listening experience.

 
 

Friday, October 18, 4:00 pm — 5:00 pm (Stage)

You Ask, We Answer

Presenters:
Hugh Robjohns, Technical Editor, Sound on Sound - Cambridge, UK
Mike Senior, Sound On Sound - Munich, Germany; Cambridge Music Technology
Paul White

Abstract:
Open Q&A session on recording and mixing techniques.

 
 

Friday, October 18, 5:00 pm — 6:00 pm (Stage)

Jimmy Jam: Q&A with renowned producer

Moderator:
Craig Anderton, Harmony Central / Electronic Musician - Santa Fe, NM, USA
Presenter:
Jimmy Jam, Flyte Tyme Productions

 
 

Saturday, October 19, 11:00 am — 12:00 pm (Stage)

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Keeping the Human Element in the Digital Age: Ways to Keep Music Sounding Alive and Interesting

Presenter:
Craig Anderton, Harmony Central / Electronic Musician - Santa Fe, NM, USA

Abstract:
It’s vital to keep the “art” in “state of the art.” This workshop starts off by examining how the brain responds to music and the ways music was made in the 50s and 60s compared to how music is being made today—what we’ve gained and what we’ve lost. The discussion then segues into practical ways to retain a human quality in both live performance and studio recordings, including ways to make modeling software sound more “organic,” how to use techniques like snapping to the grid and pitch correction in ways that don’t compromise the music’s humanity, superior methods of quantization, using control surfaces to turn mixes into performances (not just static changes in level), and more. If you want to show technology who’s the boss, this workshop is a must.

 
 

Saturday, October 19, 12:00 pm — 1:00 pm (Stage)

It Won't Sound Right If You Don't Hear It Right: Studio Acoustics, Monitoring & Critical Listening

Presenters:
Hugh Robjohns, Technical Editor, Sound on Sound - Cambridge, UK
Paul White

Abstract:
The monitoring environment acoustics and the monitoring loudspeakers are critical links in every music production chain. Any weaknesses impact negatively not only on the overall quality of mixes, but also on the confidence and ability of the user to assess and process audio material efficiently and effectively. This workshop examines the theoretical requirements and practical optimization of high-quality monitoring systems for home and project studios, drawing on the author’s experiences in the “Studio SOS” series published in Sound On Sound magazine. It will also explore choosing new monitoring loudspeakers, optimizing control room acoustics, and honing critical listening skills.

 
 

Saturday, October 19, 1:00 pm — 2:00 pm (Stage)

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Take Your Studio On Stage: Live Performance with Laptops, Looping Pedals & Other Studio Tech

Presenter:
Craig Anderton, Harmony Central / Electronic Musician - Santa Fe, NM, USA

Abstract:
For many musicians, as well as DJs and electronic acts, a 21st century live performance requires much more than just a mixer and a bunch of amps. This workshop takes a practical look at how to use technology on stage without being overwhelmed by it, ways to insure a smooth performance, and includes invaluable information on the “care and feeding” of laptops to insure optimum performance—and uninterrupted performances. Other topics include using controllers for a more vibrant live performance, performing with Ableton Live and dedicated control surfaces, improvisation with looping pedals and DAW software, and the evolution of DJ controller/laptop combinations into tools for a musical, complex new art form.

 
 

Saturday, October 19, 2:00 pm — 3:00 pm (Stage)

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How to Create, Produce, and Distribute Your Music Completely in the Cloud

Presenter:
Andrea Pejrolo, Berklee College of Music - Boston, MA, USA

Abstract:
Learn how to create and produce your music through real-time and off-line long distance collaborations using exclusively the cloud and your laptop or tablet. Through practical examples and scenarios you will learn how to:
• Set up your production environment for long distance collaborations and recording
• Choose the right hardware and software for collaborating in the cloud
• Choose the best strategies and social tools to find trustworthy creative musicians for your sessions
• Set in place the right workflow for efficient and productive recording sessions in the cloud
• Take advantage of creative talent around the world to add an original touch to your music production

 
 

Saturday, October 19, 3:00 pm — 4:00 pm (Stage)

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Loudness, Levels, and Metering

Presenter:
Hugh Robjohns, Technical Editor, Sound on Sound - Cambridge, UK

Abstract:
This seminar will cover the development and history of audio metering and discuss why traditional analog instruments are obsolete in the digital age. It will then cover digital metering and the associated problems, and contrast the concepts and practices of peak and loudness normalization. That will lead on to the aims of the ITU-R BS1770 loudness standard, its practical implementation, and then examples of how it has been implemented by a number of manufacturers and how it works in practice. There will be audio/visual examples throughout.

 
 

Saturday, October 19, 4:00 pm — 5:00 pm (Stage)

Ask the Editors

Presenters:
Kevin W. Becka, Conservatory of Recording Arts and Sciences/Mix Magazine - Gilbert, AZ, USA
Strother Bullins, Pro Audio Review magazine - North Carolina
Larry Crane, Tape Op Magazine - Portland, OR, USA; Jackpot! Recording Studio
Mike Metlay, RECORDING Magazine - Boulder, CO, USA
Hugh Robjohns, Technical Editor, Sound on Sound - Cambridge, UK
Frank Wells, Pro Sound News - Murfreesboro, TN, USA; Pro Audio Review, Music Festival Business
Paul White

Abstract:
Open Q&A session—ask the magazine guys about product reviews or technique articles. Tell us what you like. Tell us what you don't like! Or you can just ask about recording: after all, we are all practitioners too.

 
 


Return to Project Studio Expo Sessions

EXHIBITION HOURS October 18th 10am – 6pm October 19th 10am – 6pm October 20th 10am – 4pm
REGISTRATION DESK October 16th 3pm – 7pm October 17th 8am – 6pm October 18th 8am – 6pm October 19th 8am – 6pm October 20th 8am – 4pm
TECHNICAL PROGRAM October 17th 9am – 7pm October 18th 9am – 7pm October 19th 9am – 7pm October 20th 9am – 6pm
AES - Audio Engineering Society