AES New York 2013
Game Audio Session Details

Thursday, October 17, 11:15 am — 12:30 pm (Room 1E10)

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G1 - Planes, Trains, and Automobiles: Creating & Implementing Vehicle Sounds for Games

Presenter:
Mike Caviezel, Microsoft Game Studios - Redmond, WA, USA

Abstract:
This session will discuss some of the basic vehicle audio design concepts commonly found in games today. We’ll talk about system design, recording and sound design methodology, and various implementation techniques and tricks for making vehicles sound great in games.

 
 

Thursday, October 17, 2:30 pm — 4:30 pm (Room 1E11)

G2 - Diablo III—Post Mortem

Presenters:
Russell Brower, Blizzard Entertainment
Derek Duke, Blizzard Entertainment
Joseph Lawrence, Blizzard Entertainment

Abstract:
Look behind the curtain as the Audio Team behind Diablo III shows us the world of game audio development from multiple perspectives—the audio director, sound designer, and composer. Discover the tips, tricks, and techniques of a major AAA title’s audio design process from conception to completion in this postmortem.

 
 

Friday, October 18, 9:00 am — 11:00 am (Room 1E11)

G3 - Scoring "Tomb Raider": The Music of the Game

Presenter:
Alex Wilmer, Crystal Dynamics

Abstract:
"Tomb Raider's" score has been critically acclaimed as being uniquely immersive and at a level of quality on par with film. It is a truly scored experience that has raised the bar for the industry. To achieve this, new techniques in almost every part of the music's production needed to be developed. This talk will focus on the process of scoring "Tomb Raider." Every aspect will be covered from the music's creative direction, composition, implementation, and the technology behind it.

 
 

Friday, October 18, 11:45 am — 12:45 pm (Room 1E09)

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G4 - Loudness in Interactive Sound Roundup

Presenter:
Garry Taylor, Sony Computer Entertainment Europe - Cambridge, UK

Abstract:
Over the years there has been much talk of reigning in the loudness problem in the games industry. It's not just talk anymore. Listen to those who has made progress in this field and learn how to apply their efforts to your title. Recently, Sony’s Audio Standards Working Group (ASWG) released loudness recommendations for their first party titles. Garry Taylor, Audio Director at Sony Computer Entertainment, looks at the work of the ASWG, the data they collected, and how that data influenced their recommendations. He looks at their first loudness paper and how their titles are measured and tested at Quality Assurance.

 
 

Friday, October 18, 2:00 pm — 4:00 pm (Room 1E10)

G5 - Game Audio: A Primer and Educational Resources

Chair:
Stephen Harwood, Jr., Education Working Group Chair; IASIG - New York, NY, USA
Presenters:
Andrew Aversa, Drexel University; Impact Soundworks
Leonard J. Paul, School of Video Game Audio - Vancouver, Canada
Jean-Luc Sinclair, New York University - New York, NY, USA
Michael Sweet, Berklee College of Music - Boston, MA, USA

Abstract:
Game-curious? Interested in the video game industry but unsure of what exactly it is that we do here? Video game production values are improving rapidly, creating increased demand for top-notch, experienced audio professionals, but many composers, sound designers, and producers looking to bring their expertise from the world of film and TV into the video game industry are uncertain about what it is they’ll be getting themselves into. Fortunately, the field of game audio education is developing rapidly—more schools are offering related courses each year. Following a presentation of the differences between audio production for games and for film and television, this session will feature a discussion of best practices and suggestions for how to learn what it takes to succeed as an audio professional working in the game space. Come prepared to inquire, be inspired, and take notes.

 
 

Friday, October 18, 5:00 pm — 6:30 pm (Room 1E10)

G6 - In the Trenches

Chair:
Scott Selfon, Microsoft - Redmond, WA, USA
Presenters:
Russell Brower, Blizzard Entertainment
Jason Kanter, Avalanche Studios
D. Chadd Portwine, Vicarious Visions
Alex Wilmer, Crystal Dynamics

Abstract:
The guys doing the work know the most. Let's hear what they have to say about what bugs them, makes them smile, makes them drink. Tool sets both commercial and proprietary are how we get the job done. What works, what needs improvement? Who do these people rely upon for tech help, production info, direction, physical therapy? What goes on behind closed doors?

 
 

Saturday, October 19, 9:00 am — 10:00 am (Room 1E10)

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G7 - Code Monkey: Mapping Audio into a 3D Game World

Presenter:
Michael Kelly, DTS, Inc. - London, UK

Abstract:
In a game, audio lives not in isolation but often as part of a rich and complex 3-D world. This code monkey session gives an overview of the links between the 3-D game world and the world of audio DSP, with particular emphasis on the representation of sound within a 3-D world. The tutorial is aimed at audio engineers who are looking to brush up on a little 3-D math and helper SDKs as well as those who are new to this field. Attendees can expect to hear coverage of converting from Carestian to spherical coordinates, matrix transformation, vector-base amplitude panning, distance modeling, programming examples with XAudio2, and how all this fits together.

 
 

Saturday, October 19, 10:15 am — 11:15 am (Room 1E10)

G8 - Audio Shorts

Presenters:
D. Chadd Portwine, Vicarious Visions
Stephen Harwood, Jr., Education Working Group Chair; IASIG - New York, NY, USA
Jason Kanter, Avalanche Studios

Abstract:
Three presenters enter. No presenters leave. 20 minutes each to serve up an in-depth look at topics in sound design that matter most to them. Q&A to follow.

Shorty #1: Follow the Sound of My Voice: A Localization Retrospective—Follow a VO line as it travels through the localization process for Skylanders: Swap Force. We see how a movie screenplay written in English becomes one-hundred and fifty thousand .wav files in more than ten languages. Screenshots from lip-sync, special-effects, surround sound, and game-mix projects will be viewed and discussed.

Shorty #2: In-DAW Prototyping: WYSIWYG Approval and Delivery—Armed with video capture of gameplay, a content creator can develop sounds and music, as well as their in-game behavior, all without leaving the comfort of their favorite DAW. The workflow demonstrated will provide maximum protection against costly communication breakdowns, e.g., false-positive client approval and errant implementation.

Shorty #3: My Favorite Plugin!

 
 

Saturday, October 19, 11:30 am — 1:00 pm (Room 1E10)

G9 - Audio on Web—Overview and Application

Presenters:
Jan Linden, Google - Mountain View, CA, USA
Jory K. Prum, studio.jory.org - Fairfax, CA, USA

Abstract:
In the stampede to replace proprietary web browser plug-ins with a patchwork of open standards collectively known as HTML5, audio was once the largest gap in capability. In the past 18 months, however, great strides have been made to close this gap: browser support is nearly ubiquitous (with only one major hold-out), the standards body is marching toward completion of the first publication of the Web Audio API, and progress is being made in drafting and implementing the Web MIDI API, too. Developers are clearly excited, as interesting and advanced uses of the technology have been plentiful. This session will take a look at where we've come since last year's AES, discussing browser and codec support, shining a spotlight on a number of examples from developers across the globe (Infinite Jukebox, Step Daddy, BBC Radiophonic Workshop, Chrome Racer), take a look at how easy it is to work with the Web Audio API to implement sound within a web browser, and explore a few of the many libraries developers have created to make implementation even easier (Gibberish, Tuna, component.fm).

 
 

Saturday, October 19, 2:15 pm — 3:15 pm (Room 1E10)

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G10 - Game Audio Breakthroughs for HTML5 and Mobile

Presenter:
Garrett Nantz, Luxurious Animals - New York, NY, USA

Abstract:
The common practice is that once game development is almost complete, sound design just gets added. We will show you a better way to use sound design at the beginning of a project as a ideation tool to inform the design and development of games.

Using the award-winning Lux Ahoy www.luxahoy.com game, we will take a behind the scenes look at the process to create audio experiences for HTML5 and Android. Topics covered will include audio workflows, tricks and techniques to combat platform and browser sound issues, creating memorable sound effects, binaural 3-D sound, audio loop creation, music sourcing, and coding libraries.

 
 

Saturday, October 19, 3:15 pm — 4:45 pm (Room 1E10)

G11 - Learning from the Future

Presenters:
Scott Selfon, Microsoft - Redmond, WA, USA
Garry Taylor, Sony Computer Entertainment Europe - Cambridge, UK

Abstract:
With the “next generation” of game consoles soon to be this generation, what have we learned from games already in development? Is it really just “more of everything” or are other trends emerging as the defining factors for game audio production, implementation, and integration? In this panel we will discuss patterns and practices that are changing, accelerating, or declining for the titles of the next year and the next decade.

 
 

Sunday, October 20, 9:00 am — 11:00 am (Room 1E10)

G12 - Professional Game Audio—Opportunities In The Mobile Space

Chair:
Stephen Harwood, Jr., Education Working Group Chair; IASIG - New York, NY, USA
Presenters:
Andrew Aversa, Drexel University; Impact Soundworks
Steve Horowitz, The Code International Inc. - San Francisco, CA, USA
Jory K. Prum, studio.jory.org - Fairfax, CA, USA
Michael Sweet, Berklee College of Music - Boston, MA, USA
Gina Zdanowicz, Serial Lab Studios - NJ, USA

Abstract:
In addition to sound design, composition, and production supervision, game audio requires skill sets that are rarely encountered elsewhere, including interactive audio programming and implementation. This broad array of work types provides for an equally broad range of career opportunities. Whatever your background and area of specialized expertise might be, there is room for you in this rapidly growing industry. In this session a panel of accomplished industry veterans will discuss how to begin and develop a successful career in game audio with a focus on the new opportunities available in the booming mobile gaming and web apps marketplace. Audience members will take away a comprehensive understanding of the many opportunities available to audio professionals in the video game industry, as well as valuable suggestions and insights into how to land that first gig.

 
 


Return to Game Audio Sessions

EXHIBITION HOURS October 18th 10am – 6pm October 19th 10am – 6pm October 20th 10am – 4pm
REGISTRATION DESK October 16th 3pm – 7pm October 17th 8am – 6pm October 18th 8am – 6pm October 19th 8am – 6pm October 20th 8am – 4pm
TECHNICAL PROGRAM October 17th 9am – 7pm October 18th 9am – 7pm October 19th 9am – 7pm October 20th 9am – 6pm
AES - Audio Engineering Society