AES San Francisco 2012
Game Audio Session Details

Friday, October 26, 11:00 am — 12:30 pm (Room 123)

G1 - A Whole World in Your Hands: New Techniques in Generative Audio Bring Entire Game Worlds into the Realms of Mobile Platforms

Presenter:
Stephan Schütze


Abstract:
"We can't have good audio; there is not enough memory on our target platform." This is a comment heard far too often especially considering it's incorrect. Current technology already allows for complex and effective audio environments to be made with limited platform resources when developed correctly, but we are just around the corner from an audio revolution.

The next generation of tools being developed for audio creation and implementation will allow large and complex audio environments to be created using minimal amounts of resources. While the new software apps being developed are obviously an important part of this coming revolution it is the techniques, designs, and overall attitudes to audio production that will be the critical factors in successfully creating the next era of sound environments.

This presentation will break down and discuss this new methodology independent of the technology and demonstrate some simple concepts that can be used to develop a new approach to sound design. All the material presented in this talk will benefit development on current and next gen consoles as much as development for mobile devices.

 
 

Friday, October 26, 2:00 pm — 3:30 pm (Room 123)

G2 - The Future Is Now: Mind Controlled Interactive Music

Presenters:
Adam Gazzaley, Neuroscience Imaging Center, UCSF - San Francisco, CA, USA
Jim Hedges, Zynga
Kyle Machulis, Nonpolynomial Labs
Nicolas Tomasino, IGN Entertainment
Richard Warp, Leapfrog


Abstract:
If one thing is clear from the games industry over the last 20 years, it is that consumers are seeking an ever-more immersive environment for their gaming experience, and in many ways biofeedback is the "final frontier," where a player’s emotions, reactions, and mood can directly influence the gameplay. Whether the feedback comes from autonomic processes (stress or arousal, as in Galvanic Skin Response) or cognitive function (EEG signals from the brain), there is no doubt that these "active input" technologies, which differ from traditional HCI inputs (such as hardware controllers) in their singular correspondence to the individual player, greatly enhance the contextual responsiveness and "reality" of a game. These technologies are already robust enough to be integrated via audiovisual mappings into the immersive world of gaming. Things are about to get a lot more real.

 
 

Friday, October 26, 4:00 pm — 6:00 pm (Room 133)

G3 - How to Use the Interactive Reverberator: Theoretical Bases and Practical Applications

Chair:
Steve Martz, THX Ltd. - San Rafael, CA, USA
Presenters:
Toshiki Hanyu, Nihon University - Funabashi, Chiba, Japan
Takumi Higashi, CAPCOM Co. Ltd. - Okaka-shi, Oasaka-fu, Japan
Tomoya Kishi, CAPCOM Co., Ltd. - Okaka-shi, Oasaka-fu, Japan
Masataka Nakahara, ONFUTURE Ltd. - Tokyo, Japan; SONA Corp. - Tokyo, Japan


Abstract:
The interactive reverberator, applying realistic computed acoustic responses interactively for video game scenes, is a very important technology for in-game sound processing. The presenters have developed the interactive reverberator whose acoustical properties can be adjusted easily even after the calculated results are given. It has been already implemented into a Capcom's middleware, MT-framework and a trial run has been conducted successfully. How to setup initial parameters of the interactive reverberator? Do they need to be adjusted again by hearing impression? How to minimize difference in reverb timber between interactive scenes and cut scenes? The workshop introduces algorithm and basic functions of the interactive reverberator that the authors developed and also show practical operations of using it with 5.1ch run-time demos.

 
 

Saturday, October 27, 9:00 am — 11:00 am (Room 123)

G4 - Education Panel—New Models for Game Audio Education in the 21st Century

Chair:
Steve Horowitz, The Code International Inc., MPA
Panelists:
Matt Donner, Pyramind - San Francisco, CA, USA
Steve Horelick, macProVideo
Scott Looney, Academy of Art University - San Francisco, CA, USA
Stephan Schütze
Michael Sweet, Berklee College of Music - Boston, MA, USA


Abstract:
Steve Horelick from macProVideo will rundown the new ways that the internet and social media are changing the face of game audio education.

Formal Game Audio education programs are just starting to take root and sprout up all across the country and the world. From full fledged degree programs, 1 year certificate programs, to single class offerings, the word on the street is out and game audio education is becoming a hot topic and a big money-maker for schools. This panel brings together department heads from the some of the country's top public and private institutions to discuss the current landscape and offerings in audio for interactive media education. Students looking to find the right institute will get a fantastic overview of what is out there and available. This is a must for students who are trying to decide what programs are right for them as they weigh their options for getting a solid education in sound and music for games and interactive media.

 
 

Saturday, October 27, 11:00 am — 1:00 pm (Room 123)

G5 - Careers Panel—Getting a Job in the Game Industry

Chair:
Steve Horowitz, The Code International Inc., MPA
Panelists:
Charles Deenen, Electronic Arts - Los Angeles, CA, USA
Jesse Harlin, LucasArts
Adam Levenson, Levenson Artists
Richard Warp, Leapfrog


Abstract:
From AAA titles to social media, the game industry offers a lot of opportunity for the audio practitioner. In this event our panel will break down the current state of the industry.

Everyone wants to work in games, just check out the news. The game industry is larger then the film industry and the growth curve keeps going up and up and up. So, what is the best way to get that first gig in audio for games? How can I transfer my existing skills to interactive media? Should I go to school? What are the pros and cons of a degree program versus just getting out there on my own? Good questions! We will take a panel of today’s top creative professionals from large game studios to Indie producers and ask them what they think you need to know when looking for work in the game industry. So, whether you are already working in the game industry or just thinking of the best way to transfer your skills from film, TV or general music production to interactive media or a complete newbie to the industry, this panel is a must!

 
 

Saturday, October 27, 2:00 pm — 3:30 pm (Room 130)

G6 - Building a AAA Title—Roles and Responsibilities

Presenters:
Justin Drust, Red Storm Entertainment - Cary, NC, USA
Fran Dyer, Red Storm Entertainment - Cary, NC, USA
Chris Groegler, Red Storm Entertainment - Cary, NC, USA
Matt McCallus, Red Storm Entertainment - Cary, NC, USA
Matte Wagner, Red Storm Entertainment - Cary, NC, USA


Abstract:
Look behind the curtain of a AAA title and into the world of game audio development from multiple perspectives— the Producer, Audio Director, Sound Designers, and Programmer. See the inner workings of the Red Storm Audio Team as they collaborate with multiple Ubisoft studios to create the Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon: Future Soldier Multiplayer experience. Discover the tips, tricks, and techniques of a major AAA title’s audio design process from conception to completion in this postmortem.

 
 

Saturday, October 27, 4:15 pm — 5:45 pm (Room 131)

G7 - Loudness Issues in Games

Chair:
Steve Martz, THX Ltd. - San Rafael, CA, USA
Panelists:
Mike Babbitt, Dolby Labs - San Francisco, CA, USA
Richard Cabot, Qualis Audio - Lake Oswego, OR, USA
Tom Hays, Technicolor Creative Services
Mark Yeend, Microsoft - Redmond, WA, USA


Abstract:
If its too loud ….

Loudness wars in games have been hotly debated but without significant progress. Other industries have taken steps to rein in the content delivered to consumers. Are there parallels that can be applied to games? A panel of industry experts will review the present implementation of the broadcast industries’ Commercial Advertisement Loudness Mitigation Act (CALM Act) of 2012 and investigate its potential application to the games industry. The panel will also discuss current attempts to address this issue amongst Publishers and Developers.

 
 

Sunday, October 28, 9:30 am — 10:30 am (Room 133)

G8 - Audio Shorts: Resources

Presenters:
Charles Deenen, Electronic Arts - Los Angeles, CA, USA
Tom Salta, Tom Salta Music
Stephan Schütze


Abstract:
This hour long session will be split into three twenty-minute segments. Each segment will go in depth into a subject that is near and dear to the presenter. Audio Shorts is designed to pack in as much usable information in as short of period of time as possible. It’s like the Reader’s Digest of game audio tutorials. You won't want to miss this one.

Shorty #1: Tools, Tips, and Techniques, Tom Salta, presenter
Shorty #2: Sound Libraries, Stephan Schutze, presenter
Shorty #3: My Favorite Plug-in!, Charles Deenen, presenter

 
 

Sunday, October 28, 10:45 am — 12:45 pm (Room 133)

G9 - Demo Derby

Panelists:
Paul Gorman, Electronic Arts
Jesse Harlin, LucasArts
Paul Lipson, Microsoft
Jonathan Mayer, Sony Computer Entertainment America
Dren McDonald, Loot Drop


Abstract:
The Demo Derby is now at AES. Bring your best demo material and have it reviewed by the Pros. Let’s see if you have what it takes to make it in games.

Music:
Attendees submit 60 seconds of their best work for a detailed critique and feedback from a team of leading audio directors and professionals and participate in an active discussion with fellow panelists and audience members. The Derby facilitates game audio practitioners of all levels and is suited for producers, composers, audio directors, and anyone interested in music for games and interactive entertainment.

Sound Design:
Attendees submit 120 seconds of their best work for a detailed critique and feedback from a team of leading audio directors and professionals and participate in an active discussion with fellow panelists and audience members. The Derby facilitates game audio practitioners of all levels and is suited for producers, composers, audio directors, and anyone interested in music for games and interactive entertainment.

Submissions:
Demos are to be on a CD/DVD that is clearly labeled with your name and contact information. Each disc should contain only 1 demo track. This disc will be played on a disc player, not a computer. Please author the disc so that your demo “auto-plays” immediately after it loads.

Submissions will be collected 30 minutes before the session begins.

 
 

Sunday, October 28, 2:15 pm — 3:45 pm (Room 122)

G10 - Game Audio in a Web Browser

Presenters:
Owen Grace, Electronic Arts
Roger Powell, Electronic Arts
Chris Rogers, Google Inc.
Guy Whitmore, PopCap Games


Abstract:
Web browser-based computer games are popular because they do not require client application installation, can be played by single or multiple players over the internet, and are generally capable of being played across different browsers and on multiple devices. Audio tools support for developers is varied, with sound engine software typically employing the Adobe Flash plug-in for rendering audio, or the simplistic HTML5 <audio> element tag. This session will focus on a research project to create a game sound engine in Javascript based on the W3C WebAudio API draft proposal. The sound engine was used to generate 3-D spatialized rich audio content within a WebGL-based graphics game framework. The result, a networked multi-player arena combat-style game, rivals the experience of playing on a dedicated console gaming device.

 
 

Sunday, October 28, 4:15 pm — 5:45 pm (Room 132)

G11 - Getting into Sound Design

Presenters:
Elise Baldwin, Electronic Arts/Maxis - Redwood City, CA, USA
Shaun Farley, Teleproductions International - Chantilly, VA, USA
Ann Kroeber, Sound Mountain Sound Effects Service - Richmond, CA, USA
Kyrsten Mate, Skywalker Sound
Nathan Moody, Stimulant


Abstract:
A cross-section of industry experts (games, film, TV) discuss entering the effects editing and sound design field. In addition to Game Audio, the panel will discuss the broader industry as a whole, different mediums where work can be found, and how they got their start. “Things no one told me,” skills development, continuing education, and personality all contribute to a successful career. Have you been doing everything you should be?

 
 

Monday, October 29, 11:00 am — 12:30 pm (Room 132)

G12 - Doing More with Less: How Games Immersively Simulate Audio on a Budget

Presenter:
Scott Selfon, Microsoft


Abstract:
How do games pack tens or hundreds of hours of experience onto a disc, hard drive, or the web? This talk covers some of the many techniques used (and the tradeoffs incurred) to make seemingly infinite, unique, and dynamic sounds and music—often with only a single content creator and a part-time programmer. Topics will include 3-D spatial simulation, compression, basic and advanced variation, and physical modeling techniques as applied to interactive media, with focus on topics that broadly apply to the full spectrum from mobile to console.

 
 


Return to Game Audio Sessions

EXHIBITION HOURS October 27th 10am – 6pm October 28th 10am – 6pm October 29th 10am – 4pm
REGISTRATION DESK October 25th 3pm – 7pm October 26th 8am – 6pm October 27th 8am – 6pm October 28th 8am – 6pm October 29th 8am – 4pm
TECHNICAL PROGRAM October 26th 9am – 7pm October 27th 9am – 7pm October 28th 9am – 7pm October 29th 9am – 5pm
AES - Audio Engineering Society