AES New York 2009
Special Event Details

Thursday, October 8, 9:00 am — 5:00 pm

Symposium—Surround Live Seven

Manhattan Center 311 West 34th Street New York, NY 10001

Abstract:
SURROUND LIVE SEVEN PRELIMINARY PROGRAM

THE MANHATTEN CENTER
OCTOBER 8TH. 2009 9 AM TO 5 PM

Preconvention Special Event; additional fee applies Click here


CAPTURING NEW PLACES-NEW SPACES

PLATINUM SPONSORS –DTS-NEURAL, THE SPORTS VIDEO GROUP & SENNHEISER/K&H

GOLD SPONSORS – DIGICO, Ti-MAX/OUTBOARD ELECTRONICS

8:15-9:00 AM – COFFEE, REGISTRATION, CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST
9:00 AM – 9:40 AM KEYNOTE#1 – KURT GRAFFY
9:40-9:50 Coffee Break
9:50-10:30 KEYNOTE# 2 RUSS BERGER WILL ADDRESS THE FOLLOWING:
SURROUND MONITORING CHALLENGES IN ACOUSTICALLY SMALL SPACES
In conjunction with live events, finding a critical listening space for use in monitoring and producing surround sound product is nearly impossible and usually requires commandeering an office or store room and applying a patchwork of field fabricated acoustical solutions with the materials at hand. The problem is compounded by a lack of sufficient acoustical volume, since these spaces are usually required to provide an accurate listening environment for more than one listener and the ability to accurately reproduce wide bandwidth audio. Decisions are made not only about source material content and veracity, but also about how best to process and present the multichannel surround event in a manner that translates the aural experience of a live event to a wider audience. So:??????? How best to optimize an oftentimes less-than-ideal acoustical environment? Practical criteria and solutions are presented here to help overcome the limitations of monitoring surround sound in acoustically small spaces that are not intended for this purpose.
10:30 – 10:40 COFFEE BREAK
10:40-12:30 THE REAL WORLD- FRED ALDOUS, TOM SAHARA, KEVIN CLEARY
12:30 – 1:00 LUNCH (PROVIDED FOR TICKETED PARTICIPANTS)
1:00 -2:10 MIKE PAPPAS, MICHAEL NUNN
2:10-2:20 BREAK
2:30 -4:30 – PANEL DISCUSSIONS
– SPONSORED BY THE SPORTS VIDEO GROUP

SURROUND SOUND: HOW FAR WE'VE COME, WHERE WE ARE GOING
Only seven years ago the only live sports produced in Surround Sound was
traditionally NFL telecasts. But today nearly everything is in
Surround Sound, including esoteric Olympic sports like sailing and
curling. But new challenges lie ahead, including production of
non-game elements in Surround Sound and also the potential to mix not
only for the home theater but for movie cinemas broadcasting live 3D
events. How has the move of Surround Sound production beyond football
and NASCAR events changed the nature of sound design? What are the
best ways to deliver not only the roar of the crowd and engines to the
viewer but the subtle sounds of sport to viewers?
Featuring: Fred Aldous, Fox Sports; Dennis Baxter, Olympic
Broadcasting; Bob Dixon, NBC Olympics; JJ Johnstone, DTS

SAYING GOODBYE TO STEREO
Today's Surround Sound mix is compromised by the need to deliver a
quality audio signal to the mono and stereo audience.

Roger Charlesworth and friends introduce a new goal for the industry:
Standardizing on Surround Sound production for all live events,
no matter how big or small. What are the advantages, financially and
creatively, to producing only in Surround Sound? How can the industry
move towards that goal? And when can it realistically be attained?

SCHEDULED TO APPEAR: KURT GRAFFY-ARUP ACOUSTICS; TOM SAHARA-TURNER NETWORKS, FRED ALDOUS – FOX SPORTS, KEVIN CLEARY-ESPN, MIKE PAPPAS-KUVO RADIO, JIM HILSON –DOLBY LABS RUSS BERGER RBDG
TECHNOLOGY PRESENTATIONS FROM: Antoine Hurtado – ISOSTEM FRANCE, NORM HURST-SARNOFF LABS.

PRESENTERS SUBJECT TO CHANGE BASED ON AVAILABILITY


Friday, October 9, 9:00 am — 10:30 am

Motown at 50: Leon Ware, The Songwriter and Producer behind Marvin Gaye's Classic I Want You


Co-moderators:
Jason King
Harry Weinger

Abstract:
Released in 1976, Marvin Gaye's I Want You is perhaps the most sensual concept album in the entire Motown catalog. Romantic singles like the title track and "After the Dance" were massively influential, as they laid the framework for the Quiet Storm into the 1980s and beyond and provided inspiration for artists ranging from Todd Rundgren to Madonna. I Want You was crafted by visionary singer-songwriter-producer Leon Ware, who also worked in the 1970s with artists like Michael Jackson, Quincy Jones, and Minnie Riperton and later in the 1990s helped neo-soul star Maxwell rise to fame. In this rare conversation in conjunction with Motown's 50th Anniversary year, Leon Ware (currently signed to the Concord/Stax label) deconstructs the complex, groundbreaking production and engineering behind I Want You, and he touches on other musical highlights in his impressive multi-decade artistic legacy. Moderated by The Clive Davis Department of Recorded Music Artistic Director Jason King.


Friday, October 9, 11:00 am — 12:30 pm

Platinum Mastering


Moderator:
Bob Ludwig
Panelists:
Greg Calbi
Bernie Grundman

Abstract:
In an era when single-track downloads and online streaming dominate the recorded music landscape, we take a moment to celebrate the album as an art form. Mastering engineers behind some of the top recordings in history speak in depth about their work on those projects. They share fresh insights, behind-the-scenes anecdotes, rare photos, session notes, and audio clips from their historic sessions.

Panelists will discuss their work on landmark albums, including "Born in the USA," Michael Jackson's "Thriller," John Lennon's "Rock and Roll," Paul Simon's "Graceland," Johh Mayer's "Continuum," and more.


Friday, October 9, 1:00 pm — 2:30 pm

Opening Ceremonies
Awards
Keynote Speech


Abstract:
Opening Remarks:
• Executive Director Roger Furness
• President Jim Anderson
• Convention Chair Agnieszka Roginska
Program:
• AES Awards Presentation
• Introduction of Keynote Speaker
• Keynote Address by William “Bill” McGlaughlin

Awards Presentation

Please join us as the AES presents special awards to those who have made outstanding contributions to the Society in such areas of research, scholarship, and publications, as well as other accomplishments that have contributed to the enhancement of our industry. The awardees are:

BOARD OF GOVERNORS AWARD: Jorge R. Urbano Calva, Peter Cook, Michael Fleming, Steve Johnson, Toru Kamekawa, Michael C. Kelly, Francisco Miranda Kirchner, Andres Mayo, Juha Merimaa, Mercedes Onorato, Richard Sanders (posthumous), Joshua Tidsbury, Nick Zacharov
FELLOWSHIP AWARD: Jean-Marc Jot, Shawn Murphy, Ray Rayburn, Rudolph Van Gelder, Daniel Weiss
SILVER MEDAL AWARD: Ioan Allen
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE MEDAL AWARD: Irv Joel, Han Tendeloo, Emil Torick

Keynote Speaker
Peabody Award-winning radio personality William “Bill” McGlaughlin has been named Keynote Speaker for the 127th AES Convention. The long-time host and music director of American Public Media’s popular Saint Paul Sunday radio program McGlaughlin is a highly regarded broadcaster, educator, composer, and conductor. Entitled "Talent Doesn’t Push Buttons," McGlaughlin’s address will consider the relationship between the on-air talent and the audio engineers who insure the high-quality sound and technical support that contribute to a program’s long-term success.


Friday, October 9, 3:00 pm — 5:00 pm

Recording the Beatles


Co-moderators:
Kevin Ryan
Brian Kehew

Abstract:
Kevin Ryan and Brian Kehew are co-authors of Recording the Beatles, hailed as the definitive book on the Beatles' studio sessions. Recording the Beatles has received high praise for its research quality and depth of detail into Abbey Road recording techniques and equipment. The result of over a decade of painstaking research and extensive interviews, this 500-page volume is the definitive study of how the Beatles' body of music was recorded. The authors will discuss their massive undertaking and share some of the techniques and technology used by the engineers, producers, and artists collectively responsible for one of the most compelling musical legacies of all time. Their presentation will include rare photos of the studios and equipment from Abbey Road in the 1960s.


Friday, October 9, 5:00 pm — 7:00 pm

Producing Across Generations: New Challenges, New Solutions—Making Records for Next to Nothing in the 21st Century


Co-moderators:
Jesse Lauter
Nicholas Sansano, New York University - New York, NY, USA
Panelists:
Carter Matschullat
Bob Power
Mark Ronson
Jeff Silverman
Tony Visconti

Abstract:
Budgets are small, retail is dying, studios are closing, fed up audiences are taking music at will … yet devoted music professionals continue to make records for a living. How are they doing it? How are they getting paid? What type of contracts are they commanding? In a world where the “record” has become an artists’ business card, how will the producer and mixer derive participatory income? Are studio professionals being left out of the so-called 360 deals? Let’s get a quality bunch of young rising producers and a handful of seasoned vets in a room and finally open the discussion about empowerment and controlling our own destiny.


Saturday, October 10, 11:30 am — 1:00 pm

Platinum Artists


Moderator:
Mr. Bonzai
Panelists:
Jonatha Brooke
Bob Clearmountain
Scott Jacoby
Kevin Killen
Maiysha
Duncan Sheik

Abstract:
Top recording artists share their perspectives on the recording process—how they choose producers and engineers, what they look for in recording facilities, how the recording environment informs the creative process. Artists are joined on the panel by producers and engineers with whom they've worked.

You can now watch a short excerpt from this event:




Saturday, October 10, 1:00 pm — 2:00 pm

Lunchtime Keynote: Dave Giovannoni of First Sounds


Moderator:
Dave Giovannoni

Abstract:
Before Edison, Part 2 – Recovering (and Reinterpreting) the World’s Earliest Sound Recordings

First Sounds rewrote history last year when it recovered one of mankind’s first recordings of its own voice, made in Paris in 1860—advancing by 17 years the invention of audio recording. Attendees at the 125th AES Convention were the first to hear what was then believed to be the world’s second-oldest retrievable sound. This year First Sounds founder David Giovannoni returns to AES to report the most recent discoveries and introduce even older sounds. He’ll tell of finding a seminal cache of documents that trace (literally) the development of the phonautograph from proof of concept to laboratory instrument. He’ll describe the technical challenges of evoking sound from primative recordings made to be seen, not heard. And he’ll recount how the inventor's own voice was revealed after posing for a year as the phantasm of a young woman.

First Sounds is an informal collaborative of sound historians, audio engineers, archeophonists, and other individuals who freely contribute their time, expertise, and resources to make mankind’s earliest audio recordings audible to all people for all time. For more information go to www.firstsounds.org

David Giovannoni is the founder and President of AudiGraphics, Inc., a firm that provides management tools to National Public Radio, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, and hundreds of public radio stations nationwide. In 2005 he turned over his operational responsibilities in order to pursue his avocation for historical sound recordings. In the last three years his historic CD reissues and liner notes on Archeophone Records have earned him five Grammy nominations and one Grammy. He is a principal at First Sounds, a collaboration of experts dedicated to making the earliest sound recordings available to all people for all time. First Sounds gained international attention last year when it identified and played back sound recordings made in Paris in 1860 – 17 years before Edison invented the phonograph.


Saturday, October 10, 2:30 pm — 4:00 pm

Grammy SoundTable: MWA! Mixing with Attitude


Moderator:
Nile Rodgers
Panelists:
Chuck Ainlay
Serban Ghenea
Chris Lord-Alge
Tony Maserati

Abstract:
MWA! Mixing with Attitude

It’s the eternal challenge: How to create mixes that stand out from the pack, have power and personality, please the artist, producer, and label, sound great at home, in the car, on the radio—and—(oh no!) on MP3. Translating excitement from a recording to its final mix is a high pressure art form, and our panelists are constantly working at the top of their game. Join us for opinions, tips, tricks, and anecdotes as they share their secrets for success.

The Annual GRAMMY Recording SoundTable is presented by the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences Inc. (NARAS) and hosted by AES.


Saturday, October 10, 5:00 pm — 7:30 pm

TEC Awards


Abstract:
The Mix Foundation for Excellence in Audio was established in 1991 to recognize and promote excellence in the audio arts and sciences. The 25th Annual Technical Excellence & Creativity Awards, the industry's foremost recognition of achievement in audio production and product design, will be presented at this event. The TEC Awards reception will begin at 5:00 PM in the South Concourse and the ceremony will follow at 6 PM in Room 1E12/13. As a charitable event, tickets are required for both the reception and the ceremony and may be purchased online prior to the event at www.mixfoundation.org click here or at Booth 127 during the convention subject to availability.


Saturday, October 10, 7:30 pm — 9:00 pm

Organ Concert
by
Graham Blyth

Church of Saint Mary the Virgin 145 West 46th Street, NY

Abstract:
Graham Blythe’s traditional organ concert will be given at the Church of Saint Mary the Virgin, founded in 1868. Graham will play the Three Chorales by Franck - in E major, B minor, and A minor - preceding each with one of the "Great" Preludes & Fugues of J.S.Bach - E minor BWV 548, B minor BWV 544, and A minor BWV 543.

César Franck wrote only 12 major works for organ but despite this small output he is considered by many to be the greatest composer of organ music since J.S. Bach. This may well have a lot to do with Liszt's public declaration that Franck was a worthy successor to the great man having just heard him play his Six Pieces for Organ at a Recital in Paris.


Sunday, October 11, 11:30 am — 1:00 pm

Platinum Producers and Engineers


Moderator:
Paul Verna
Panelists:
Mike Clink
Sylvia Massy
Dave Reitzas
Bruce Swedien
Tony Visconti

Abstract:
The producers and engineers on this panel have helped bring to life the musical visions of a dizzying array of recording icons, including Guns N’ Roses, Whitesnake, Survivor, Madonna, Celine Dion, Natalie Cole, David Bowie, T. Rex, Angelique Kidjo, Duke Ellington, Michael Jackson, George Benson, Tool, Johnny Cash, and System of a Down. These professionals share insights from decades producing, engineering, and mixing some of the most enduring recordings in history.


Sunday, October 11, 1:00 pm — 2:00 pm

Lunchtime Keynote: Kees Immink - CD


Moderator:
Kees Immink, Turing Machines Inc. - Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Abstract:
Beethoven, Shannon, and the Compact Disc

In twenty-five years time, digital electronics has replaced essentially all analog consumer electronics products, and the word "digital" has become synonymous with quality. Digital has penetrated all realms of human activities and has profoundly enriched everyday lives around the world. The invention of the CD with their superior sound quality and scratch-free durability marked the beginning of the shift from analog to digital music technology, the "digital revolution."

An audio compact disc (CD) holds up to 74 minutes, 33 seconds of sound, just enough for a complete mono recording of Ludwig von Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony (Alle Menschen werden Brüder) at probably the slowest pace it has ever been played, during the Bayreuther Festspiele in 1951 conducted by Wilhelm Furtwängler.

Each second of music requires about 1.5 million bits, which are represented as tiny pits and lands ranging from 0.9 to 3.3 micrometers in length. More than 19 billion channel bits are recorded as a spiral track of alternating pits and lands over a distance of 5.38 kilometers (3.34 miles), which are scanned at walking speed, 4.27 km per hour.

We will discuss the various crucial technical decisions made that would determine the technical success or failure of the new medium.

Kees Immink is president and founder of Turing Machines Inc. and an adjunct professor at the Institute for Experimental Mathematics, Essen, Germany. Immink, a native of Rotterdam, who obtained his Ph.D. degree from the Eindhoven University of Technology, has progressed the digital audio revolution from its very beginning. Over the course of his career, Immink has contributed to the development of a wealth of digital recording products, including the Compact Disc, DAT, DCC, DVD, and the Blu-Ray disc. Immink’s work is documented in over 150 technical papers and over 1000 U.S. and foreign patents. Immink, a former AES president, received widespread applause for his contributions to digital audio; he is recipient of the AES Gold Medal, IEEE Edison Medal, and SMPTE Progress Medal.


Sunday, October 11, 1:30 pm — 5:00 pm

Digital Microphones Live Recording Session


Moderator:
Gregor Zielinsky, Sennheiser
Panelists:
Stephan Flock, RME
Stephan Peus, Neumann
Helmut Wittek, Schoeps

Abstract:
A live recording session will be presented, recording a small Symphony Orchestra at the NYU Loewe Theater and Music Technology Studios. Using digital microphones from Schoeps, Neumann, and Sennheiser a whole setup of a digital mic system is shown and explained. Additionally, AES42 Interfaces from RME are presented and in operation. Participants will then have the opportunity to listen and work with the digital microphones. The new control room at NYU will be used.

There will be a bus going from Javits to NYU and tickets will be available at the same location as the Technical Tour tickets.


Sunday, October 11, 2:00 pm — 4:00 pm

Behind The Glass: Audio Production in the 21st Century


Moderator:
Howard Massey
Panelists:
Tony Brown
Simon Climie
Ryan Hewitt
George Massenburg
Ann Mincieli
Russ Titelman

Abstract:
Howard Massey is a leading audio industry consultant, technical writer, and author of Behind the Glass and Behind the Glass Volume II, two collections of in-depth interviews with top record producers and audio engineers widely used in recording schools the world over. He also co-authored legendary Beatles engineer Geoff Emerick’s acclaimed 2006 memoir, Here, There, and Everywhere: My Life Recording the Music of the Beatles.

Join us as we gather together some of the top names from the recently released Behind The Glass Volume II for a lively discussion about the state of the industry today and a look ahead at the way that production techniques are likely to evolve in the years to come. Topics will include new media and online distribution; the application of legacy (analog) technology in an increasingly digital world; and the critical role of the producer/engineer team in driving both the creative and technical aspects of the record-making process.


Sunday, October 11, 4:30 pm — 6:30 pm

Les Paul—Chasing Sound


Moderator:
David Bowles
Panelists:
John Paulson, Director, Cinematographer, and Editor
Robert Sullivan, Sound Recordist

Abstract:
A 90-minute performance documentary on the life and accomplishments of the legendary Les Paul. A true inventor, Paul was father of the solid-body electric guitar, inventor of overdubbing and multi-track recording, king of the ‘50s pop charts, and architect of rock ‘n’ roll. In addition Les Paul's connection with the AES dates back to its inception. This film was produced in High Definition by John Paulson Productions, LLC, Icon Television Music, and WNET/Thirteen American Masters.

After the film, the panelists will be interviewed on artistic and technical details of how this project came into being, after which a limited number of questions will be taken from the audience.


Sunday, October 11, 7:15 pm — 9:00 pm

Heyser Lecture
followed by
Technical Council
Reception


Abstract:
The Richard C. Heyser distinguished lecturer for the 127th AES Convention is Phil Ramone. The title of his address is “Technology and Music Meet Again.”

Ramone’s presentation will focus on the continuing partnership that technology and music have played through out the years. The evolution of the recording industry will be explored showing how technological innovations have lead to revolutionize the experience of music for the artist and fan a like. The exponential pace of technology will be spotlighted, leading to how it has left our entire industry in chaos.


Monday, October 12, 11:00 am — 12:30 pm

Audio Ear Training: Learning the Most Essential Audio Skill!


Moderator:
David Moulton

Abstract:
Developing the aural skills needed to quickly and accurately identify audio qualities by ear alone is one of the most productive educational efforts a student can make in the field of audio today. Forty years ago, David Moulton adapted music ear training techniques used in music conservatories to teach his first audio students. He has implemented versions of this in all of the colleges he has taught at, as well as for the National Public Radio Music Recording Workshops in the 1980s. In 1993, he authored Golden Ears, a stand-alone CD course of audio ear training. In this tutorial, Dave will share some of the things he has learned along the way about how we hear, what it means, and how we can use it for fun and profit.


Monday, October 12, 1:00 pm — 2:00 pm

Lunchtime Keynote: Ashley Kahn - Kind of Blue


Abstract:
At 50, "Kind of Blue" is many things: the best-selling classic jazz album of all time. The best-known album by today's most listened-to jazz musician Miles Davis. The one jazz album owned by a majority of non-jazz-focused music fans. The only jazz album to appear consistently at the top of greatest-album lists charted by rock, R&B, and pop music publications. Yet besides the session masters' one assembled reel, one safety with minimal studio dialogue, and a few black-and-white photos, not much survives from the two historic 1959 sessions that produced "Kind of Blue." Using PowerPoint images, audio examples of alternate takes, studio chatter, and examples of how the 3-track technology of the time, Ashley Kahn, author of the bestselling book Kind of Blue: The Making of the Miles Davis Masterpiece will present an informative and entertaining fly-on-the-wall perspective on the creation of Miles Davis's classic recording.

Ashley Kahn is an author, music journalist, and radio producer whose voice is often heard on National Public Radio's “Morning Edition,” and whose books include Kind of Blue: The Making of the Miles Davis Masterpiece; The House That Trane Built: The Story of Impulse Records; and A Love Supreme: The Story of John Coltrane’s Signature Album. He also teaches courses on music history at the Clive Davis Department of Recorded Music at New York University. During a thirty-year career in the music business, Kahn has served as a music editor at VH1, the primary editor of Rolling Stone: The Seventies (Little, Brown), a deejay on a variety of radio stations, and – for a ten-year stint –tour manager for a multitude of music groups, including: Paul Simon, Peter Gabriel, Ladysmith Black Mambazo, Debbie Harry & the Jazz Passengers and Britney Spears. He is currently working on a 70-year history of the well-known Blue Note jazz label, titled Somethin’ Else: The Story of Blue Note Records and the Birth of Modern Jazz.


Monday, October 12, 2:00 pm — 5:00 pm

Society of Broadcast Engineers Certification Exams


Abstract:
The Society of Broadcast Engineers will offer SBE certification exams to AES Convention attendees. SBE Certification is the recognized benchmark of technical ability in broadcasting. Exams for any of the SBE certification levels will be available. Pre-registration through the SBE National office is preferred, but on-site registration will be available at the convention. Fees can be paid via cash, check or credit card (Visa, Master Card or American Express). SBE membership is not required to hold SBE Certification. Please arrive at least ten minutes prior to the exam period.