AES Show: Make the Right Connections Audio Engineering Society

AES San Francisco 2008
Recording Industry Event Details

Thursday, October 2, 9:00 am — 10:45 am

B1 - Listening Tests on Existing and New HDTV Surround Coding Systems


Chair:
Gerhard Stoll, IRT
Panelists:
Florian Camerer, ORF
Kimio Hamasaki, NHK Science & Technical Research Laboratories
Steve Lyman, Dolby Laboratories
Andrew Mason, BBC R&D
Bosse Ternström, SR

Abstract:
With the advent of HDTV services, the public is increasingly
being exposed to surround sound presentations using so-called home theater environments. However, the restricted bandwidth available into the home, whether by broadcast, or via broadband, means that there is an increasing interest in the performance of low bit rate surround sound audio coding systems for “emission” coding. The European Broadcasting Union Project Group D/MAE (Multichannel Audio Evaluations) conducted immense listening tests to asses the sound quality of multichannel audio codecs for broadcast applications in a range from 64 kbit/s to 1.5 Mbit/s. Several laboratories in Europe have contributed to this work.

This Broadcast Session will provide profound information about these tests and the results. Further information will be provided, how the professional industry, i.e. codec proponents and decoder manufacturers, is taking further steps to develop new products for multichannel sound in HDTV.


Thursday, October 2, 11:00 am — 1:00 pm

W2 - Archiving and Preservation for Audio Engineers


Chair:
Konrad Strauss
Panelists:
Chuck Ainlay
George Massenburg
John Spencer

Abstract:
The art of audio recording is 130 years old. Recordings from the late 1890s to the present day have been preserved thanks to the longevity of analog media, but can the same be said for today's digital recordings? Digital storage technology is transient in nature, making lifespan and obsolescence a significant concern. Additionally, digital recordings are usually platform specific; relying on the existence of unique software and hardware platforms, and the practice of nondestructive recording creates a staggering amount of data much of which is redundant or unneeded. This workshop will address the subject of best practices for storage and preservation of digital audio recordings and outline current thinking and archiving strategies from the home studio to the large production facility.


Thursday, October 2, 11:00 am — 1:00 pm

T2 - Standards-Based Audio Networks Using IEEE 802.1 AVB


Presenters:
Robert Boatright, Harman International - CA, USA
Matthew Xavier Mora, Apple - Cupertino, CA, USA
Michael Johas Teener, Broadcom Corp. - Irvine CA, USA

Abstract:
Recent work by IEEE 802 working groups will allow vendors to build a standards-based network with the appropriate quality of service for high quality audio performance and production. This new set of standards, developed by the IEEE 802.1 Audio Video Bridging Task Group, provides three major enhancements for 802-based networks:

1. Precise timing to support low-jitter media clocks and accurate synchronization of multiple streams,
2. A simple reservation protocol that allows an endpoint device to notify the various network elements in a path so that they can reserve the resources necessary to support a particular stream, and
3. Queuing and forwarding rules that ensure that such a stream will pass through the network within the delay specified by the reservation.

These enhancements require no changes to the Ethernet lower layers and are compatible with all the other functions of a standard Ethernet switch (a device that follows the IEEE 802.1Q bridge specification). As a result, all of the rest of the Ethernet ecosystem is available to developers—in particular, the various high speed physical layers (up to 10 gigabit/sec in current standards, even higher speeds are in development), security features (encryption and authorization), and advanced management (remote testing and configuration) features can be used. This tutorial will outline the basic protocols and capabilities of AVB networks, describe how such a network can be used, and provide some simple demonstrations of network operation (including a live comparison with a legacy Ethernet network).


Thursday, October 2, 1:00 pm — 2:30 pm

Opening Ceremonies
Awards
Keynote Speech


Abstract:
Opening Remarks:
• Executive Director Roger Furness
• President Bob Moses
• Convention Cochairs John Strawn, Valerie Tyler
Program:
• AES Awards Presentation
• Introduction of Keynote Speaker
• Keynote Address by Chris Stone

Awards Presentation

Please join us as the AES presents special awards to those who have made outstanding contributions to the Society in such areas of research, scholarship, and publications, as well as other accomplishments that have contributed to the enhancement of our industry. The awardees are:

PUBLICATIONS AWARD: Roger S. Grinnip III
BOARD OF GOVERNORS AWARD: Jim Anderson, Peter Swarte
FELLOWSHIP AWARD: Jonathan Abel, Angelo Farina, Rob Maher, Peter Mapp, Christoph Musialik, Neil Shaw, Julius Smith, Gerald Stanley, Alexander Voishvillo, William Whitlock
SILVER MEDAL AWARD: Keith Johnson
GOLD MEDAL AWARD: George Massenburg
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE MEDAL AWARD: Jay McKnight

Keynote Speaker

Record Plant co-founder Chris Stone will explore new trends and opportunities in the music industry and what it takes to succeed in today's environment, including how to utilize networking and free services to reduce risk when starting a new small business. Speaking from his strengths as a business/marketing entrepreneur, Stone will focus on the artist’s need to develop a sophisticated approach to operating their own business and also how traditional engineers can remain relevant and play a meaningful role in the ongoing evolution of the recording industry. Stone’s keynote address is entitled: The Artist Owns the Industry.


Thursday, October 2, 2:30 pm — 4:30 pm

One on One Mentoring Session—Part 1


Abstract:
Students are invited to sign-up for an individual meeting with a distinguished mentor from the audio industry. The opportunity to sign up will be given at the end of the opening SDA meeting. Any remaining open spots will be posted in the student area. All students are encouraged to participate in this exciting and rewarding opportunity for individual discussion with industry mentors.


Thursday, October 2, 2:30 pm — 6:00 pm

TT2 - Dolby Laboratories, San Francisco


Abstract:
Visit legendary Dolby Laboratories’ headquarters while you are in San Francisco. Dolby, known for its more than 40 years of audio innovation and leadership, will showcase its latest technologies (audio and video) for high-definition packaged disc media and digital cinema. Demonstrations will take place in Dolby’s state-of-the-art listening rooms, and in their world-class Presentation Studio.

Dolby Laboratories (NYSE:DLB) is the global leader in technologies that are essential elements in the best entertainment experiences. Founded in 1965 and best known for high-quality audio and surround sound, Dolby innovations enrich entertainment at the movies, at home, or on the go. Visit http://www.dolby.com for more information.

Note: Maximum of 40 participants per tour.


Price: $30 (members), $40 (nonmembers)

Thursday, October 2, 2:30 pm — 4:30 pm

B3 - Considerations for Facility Design


Chair:
Paul McLane, Radio World
Panelists:
Sam Berkow, SIA Acoustics
William Hallisky, Meridian Design
John Storyk, Walters Storyk

Abstract:
A roundtable chat with design experts Sam Berkow, John Storyk, and William Hallinsky. We’ve modified the format of this popular session further to allow attendees to hear from several of today’s top facility designers in a more relaxed and less hurried format.

What makes for an exceptional facility? What are the top pitfalls of facility design? Bring your cup of coffee and share in the conversation as Radio World U.S. Editor in Chief Paul McLane talks with Sam Berkow of SIA Acoustics, John Storyk of Walters-Storyk Design Group, and William Hallinsky of Meridian Design Associates, Architects, to learn what leaders in radio/television broadcast and production studios are doing today in architectural, acoustic, and facility design.

How are the demands of today’s multi-platform broadcasters changing design of facilities? How do streaming, video for radio and new media affect the process? What does it really mean to say a facility is “green”? How should broadcasters handle cross-training? What are the most common pitfalls broadcasters should avoid in designing and budgeting for a facility? What key decisions must you make today to ensure that your fabulous new facility will still be doing the job in 10 or 20 years?


Thursday, October 2, 2:30 pm — 4:00 pm

W3 - Analyzing, Recommending, and Searching Audio Content—Commercial Applications of Music Information Retrieval


Chair:
Jay LeBoeuf, Imagine Research
Panelists:
Markus Cremer, Gracenote
Matthias Gruhne, Fraunhofer Institute for Digital Media Technology
Tristan Jehan, The Echo Nest
Keyvan Mohajer, Melodis Corporation

Abstract:
This workshop will focus on the cutting-edge applications of music information retrieval technology (MIR). MIR is a key technology behind music startups recently featured in Wired and Popular Science. Online music consumption is dramatically enhanced by automatic music recommendation, customized playlisting, song identification via cell phone, and rich metadata / digital fingerprinting technologies. Emerging startups offer intelligent music recommender systems, lookup of songs via humming the melody, and searching through large archives of audio. Recording and music software now offer powerful new features, leveraging MIR techniques. What’s out there and where is this all going? This workshop will inform AES members of the practical developments and exciting opportunities within MIR, particularly with the rich combination of commercial work in this area. Panelists will include industry thought-leaders: a blend of established commercial companies and emerging start-ups.


Thursday, October 2, 3:00 pm — 5:00 pm

Evolution of Video Game Sound


Moderator:
John Griffin, Marketing Director, Games, Dolby Laboratories - USA
Panelists:
Simon Ashby, Product Director, Audiokinetic - Canada
Will Davis, Audio Lead, Electronic Arts/Pandemic Studios - USA
Charles Deenen, Sr. Audio Director, Electronic Arts Black Box - Canada
Tom Hays, Director, Technicolor Interactive Services - USA

Abstract:
From the discrete-logic build of Pong to the multi-core processors of modern consoles, video game audio has made giant strides in complexity to a heightened level of immersion and user interactivity. Since its modest beginnings of monophonic bleeps to the high-resolution multichannel orchestrations and point-of-view audio panning, audio professionals have creatively stretched the envelopes of audio production techniques, as well as the game engine capabilities.

The panel of distinguished video game audio professionals will discuss audio production challenges of landmark game platforms, techniques used to maximize the video game audio experience, the dynamics leading to the modern video game soundtracks, and where the video game audio experience is heading.

This event has been organized by Gene Radzik, AES Historical Committee Co-Chair.


Thursday, October 2, 4:00 pm — 5:00 pm

Listening Session


Abstract:
Students are encouraged to bring in their projects to a non competitive listening sessions for feedback and comments form Dave Greenspan, a panel, and audience. Students will be able to sign up at the first SDA meeting for time slots. Students who are finalists in the Recording competition are excluded from this event to allow others who were not finalists the opportunity for feedback.


Thursday, October 2, 4:30 pm — 6:30 pm

B4 - Mobile/Handheld Broadcasting: Developing a New Medium


Chair:
Jim Kutzner, Public Broadcasting Service
Panelists:
Mark Aitken, Sinclair Broadcast Group
Sterling Davis, Cox Broadcasting
Brett Jenkins, Ion Media Networks
Dakx Turcotte, Neural Audio Corp.

Abstract:
The broadcasting industry, the broadcast and consumer equipment vendors, and the Advanced Television Systems Committee have been vigorously moving forward toward the development of a Mobile/Handheld DTV broadcast standard and its practical implementation. In order to bring this new service to the public players from various industry segments have come together in an unprecedented fashion. In this session key leaders in this activity will present what the emerging system includes, how far the industry has progressed, and what’s left to be done.


Thursday, October 2, 5:00 pm — 6:45 pm

W4 - How to Avoid Critical Data Loss After Catastrophic System Failure


Chair:
Chris Bross, DriveSavers, Inc.

Abstract:
Natural disaster, drive failure, human error, and cyber-related crime or corruption can threaten business continuity and a studio’s long-term survival if their data storage devices are compromised. Back up systems and disaster recovery plans can help the studio survive a system crash, but precautionary measures should also be taken to prevent catastrophic data loss should back-up measures fail or be incomplete.

A senior data recovery engineer will review the most common causes of drive failure, demonstrate the consequences of improper diagnosis and mishandling of the device, and provide appropriate action steps you can take for each type of data loss. Learn how to avoid further media damage or permanent data loss after the crash and optimize the chance for a complete data recovery.


Friday, October 3, 9:00 am — 11:00 am

One on One Mentoring Session—Part 2


Abstract:
Students are invited to sign-up for an individual meeting with a distinguished mentor from the audio industry. The opportunity to sign up will be given at the end of the opening SDA meeting. Any remaining open spots will be posted in the student area. All students are encouraged to participate in this exciting and rewarding opportunity for individual discussion with industry mentors.


Friday, October 3, 9:00 am — 10:30 am

P7 - Audio Content Management


P7-1 A Piano Sound Database for Testing Automatic Transcription MethodsLuis Ortiz-Berenguer, Elena Blanco-Martin, Alberto Alvarez-Fernandez, Jose A. Blas-Moncalvillo, Francisco J. Casajus-Quiros, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid - Madrid, Spain
A piano sound database, called PianoUPM, is presented. It is intended to help the researching community in developing and testing transcription methods. A practical database needs to contain notes and chords played through the full piano range, and it needs to be recorded from acoustic pianos rather than synthesized ones. The presented piano sound database includes the recording of thirteen pianos from different manufacturers. There are both upright and grand pianos. The recordings include the eighty-eight notes and eight different chords played both in legato and staccato styles. It also includes some notes of every octave played with four different forces to analyze the nonlinear behavior. This work has been supported by the Spanish National Project TEC2006-13067-C03-01/TCM.
Convention Paper 7538 (Purchase now)

P7-2 Measurements of Spaciousness for Stereophonic MusicAndy Sarroff, Juan P. Bello, New York University - New York, NY, USA
The spaciousness of pre-recorded stereophonic music, or how large and immersive the virtual space of it is perceived to be, is an important feature of a produced recording. Quantitative models of spaciousness as a function of a recording’s (1) wideness of source panning and of a recording’s (2) amount of overall reverberation are proposed. The models are independently evaluated in two controlled experiments. In one, the panning widths of a distribution of sources with varying degrees of panning are estimated; in the other, the extent of reverberation for controlled mixtures of sources with varying degrees of reverberation are estimated. The models are shown to be valid in a controlled experimental framework.
Convention Paper 7539 (Purchase now)

P7-3 Music Annotation and Retrieval System Using Anti-ModelsZhi-Sheng Chen, Jia-Min Zen, Jyh-Shing Roger Jang, National Tsing Hua University - Taiwan
Query-by-semantic-description (QBSD) is a natural way for searching/annotating music in a large database. We propose such a system by considering anti-words for each annotation word based on the concept of supervised multi-class labeling (SML). Moreover, words that are highly correlated with the anti-semantic meaning of a word constitute its anti-word set. By modeling both a word and its anti-word set, our system can achieve +8.21% and +1.6% gains of average precision and recall against SML under the condition of an equal average number of annotation words, that is, 10. By incorporating anti-models, we also allow queries with anti-semantic words, which is not an option for previous systems.
Convention Paper 7540 (Purchase now)

P7-4 The Effects of Lossy Audio Encoding on Onset Detection TasksKurt Jacobson, Matthew Davies, Mark Sandler, Queen Mary University of London - London, UK
In large audio collections, it is common to store audio content with perceptual encoding. However, encoding parameters may vary from collection to collection or even within a collection—using different bit rates, sample rates, codecs, etc. We evaluated the effect of various audio encodings on the onset detection task and show that audio-based onset detection methods are surprisingly robust in the presence of MP3 encoded audio. Statistically significant changes in onset detection accuracy only occur at bit-rates lower than 32 kbps.
Convention Paper 7541 (Purchase now)

P7-5 An Evaluation of Pre-Processing Algorithms for Rhythmic Pattern AnalysisMatthias Gruhne, Christian Dittmar, Daniel Gaertner, Fraunhofer Institute for Digital Media Technology - Ilmenau, Germany; Gerald Schuller, Ilmenau Technical University - Ilmenau, Germany
For the semantic analysis of polyphonic music, such as genre recognition, rhythmic pattern features (also called Beat Histogram) can be used. Feature extraction is based on the correlation of rhythmic information from drum instruments in the audio signal. In addition to drum instruments, the sounds of pitched instruments are usually also part of the music signal to analyze. This can have a significant influence on the correlation patterns. This paper describes the influence of pitched instruments for the extraction of rhythmic features, and evaluates two different pre-processing methods. One method computes a sinusoidal and noise model, where its residual signal is used for feature extraction. In the second method, a drum transcription based on spectral characteristics of drum sounds is performed, and the rhythm pattern feature is derived directly from the occurrences of the drum events. Finally, the results are explained and compared in detail.
Convention Paper 7542 (Purchase now)

P7-6 A Framework for Producing Rich Musical Metadata in Creative Music ProductionGyorgy Fazekas, Yves Raimond, Mark Sandler, Queen Mary University of London - London, UK
Musical metadata may include references to individuals, equipment, procedures, parameters, or audio features extracted from signals. There are countless possibilities for using this data during the production process. An intelligent audio editor, besides internally relying on it, can be both producer and consumer of information about speci?c aspects of music production. In this paper we propose a framework for producing and managing meta information about a recording session, a single take or a subsection of a take. As basis for the necessary knowledge representation we use the Music Ontology with domain speci?c extensions. We provide examples on how metadata can be used creatively, and demonstrate the implementation of an extended metadata editor in a multitrack audio editor application.
Convention Paper 7543 (Purchase now)

P7-7 SoundTorch: Quick Browsing in Large Audio CollectionsSebastian Heise, Michael Hlatky, Jörn Loviscach, Hochschule Bremen (University of Applied Sciences) - Bremen, Germany
Musicians, sound engineers, and foley artists face the challenge of finding appropriate sounds in vast collections containing thousands of audio files. Imprecise naming and tagging forces users to review dozens of files in order to pick the right sound. Acoustic matching is not necessarily helpful here as it needs a sound exemplar to match with and may miss relevant files. Hence, we propose to combine acoustic content analysis with accelerated auditioning: Audio files are automatically arranged in 2-D by psychoacoustic similarity. A user can shine a virtual flashlight onto this representation; all sounds in the light cone are played back simultaneously, their position indicated through surround sound. User tests show that this method can leverage the human brain's capability to single out sounds from a spatial mixture and enhance browsing in large collections of audio content.
Convention Paper 7544 (Purchase now)

P7-8 File System Tricks for Audio ProductionMichael Hlatky, Sebastian Heise, Jörn Loviscach, Hochschule Bremen (University of Applied Sciences) - Bremen, Germany
Not every file presented by a computer operating system needs to be an actual stream of independent bits. We demonstrate that different types of virtual files and folders including so-called "Filesystems in Userspace" (FUSE) allow streamlining audio content management with relatively little additional complexity. For instance, an off-the-shelf database system may present a distributed sound library through (seemingly) standard files in a project-specific hierarchy with no physical copying of the data involved. Regions of audio files may be represented as separate files; audio effect plug-ins may be displayed as collections of folders for on-demand processing while files are read. We address differences between operating systems, available implementations, and lessons learned when applying such techniques.
Convention Paper 7545 (Purchase now)


Friday, October 3, 10:00 am — 12:30 pm

TT4 - Paul Stubblebine Mastering/The Tape Project, San Francisco


Abstract:
A world-class mastering studio with credits that include classic recordings for The Grateful Dead and Santana and such new artists as Ferron, California Zephyr, and Jennifer Berezan. Now deeply involved with DVD as well as traditional audio mastering, the studio recently moved to a larger, full service Mission Street complex. The Tape Project remasters recordings for analog tape distribution.

Note: Maximum of 20 participants per tour.


Price: $30 (members), $40 (nonmembers)

Friday, October 3, 11:30 am — 1:00 pm

Platinum Producers and Engineers


Moderator:
Paul Verna
Panelists:
Tony Berg
David Bowles
Jerry Harrison
Stephan Jenkins, Third Eye Blind
Chris Lord-Alge

Abstract:
Some of the industry’s top producers and engineers discuss the routes that led them to their careers in the studio. Prospective panelists include studio pros who arrived at their craft from the A&R side (Tony Berg), from the recording artist side (Stephan Jenkins from Third Eye Blind), from engineering (Chris Lord-Alge), and from formal training in classical music (David Bowles). The panel will be moderated by Paul Verna, veteran of Billboard and Mix magazines, and co-author of The Encyclopedia of Record Producers.


Friday, October 3, 11:30 am — 12:30 pm

T5 - A Postproduction Model for Video Game Audio: Sound Design, Mixing, and Studio Techniques


Presenter:
Rob Bridgett, Radical Entertainment - Vancouver, BC, Canada

Abstract:
In video game development, audio postproduction is still a concept that is frowned upon and frequently misunderstood. Audio content often still has the same cut-off deadlines as visual and design content, allowing no time to polish the audio or to reconsider the sound in context of the finished visuals. This tutorial talks about ways in which video game audio can learn from the models of postproduction sound in cinema, allotting a specific time at the end of a project for postproduction sound design, and perhaps more importantly, mixing and balancing all the elements of the soundtrack before the game is shipped. This tutorial will draw upon examples and experience of postproduction audio work we have done over the last two years such as mixing the Scarface game at Skywalker Sound and also more recent titles such as Prototype. The tutorial will investigate:

•Why cutting off sound at the same time as design and art doesn't work
•Planning and preparing for postproduction audio on a game
•Real-time sound replacement and mixing technology (proprietary and middleware solutions)
•Interactive mixing strategies (my game is 40+ hours long, how do I mix it all?)
•Building/equipping a studio for postproduction game audio.


Friday, October 3, 11:30 am — 1:00 pm

P8 - Room Acoustics and Binaural Audio


P8-1 On the Minimum-Phase Nature of Head-Related Transfer FunctionsJuhan Nam, Miriam A. Kolar, Jonathan S. Abel, Stanford University - Stanford, CA, USA
For binaural synthesis, head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) are commonly implemented as pure delays followed by minimum-phase systems. Here, the minimum-phase nature of HRTFs is studied. The cross-coherence between minimum-phase and unprocessed measured HRTFs was seen to be greater than 0.9 for a vast majority of the HRTFs, and was rarely below 0.8. Non-minimum-phase filter components resulting in reduced cross-coherence appeared in frontal and ipsilateral directions. The excess group delay indicates that these non-minimum-phase components are associated with regions of moderate HRTF energy. Other regions of excess phase correspond to high-frequency spectral nulls, and have little effect on cross-coherence.
Convention Paper 7546 (Purchase now)

P8-2 Apparatus Comparison for the Characterization of SpacesAdam Kestian, Agnieszka Roginska, New York University - NY, NY, USA
This work presents an extension of the Acoustic Pulse Reflectometry (APR) methodology that was previously used to obtain the characteristics of smaller acoustic spaces. Upon reconstructing larger spaces, the geometric configuration and characteristics of the measurement apparatus can be directly related to the clarity of the results. This paper describes and compares three measurement setups and apparatus configurations. The advantages and disadvantages of each methodology are discussed.
Convention Paper 7547 (Purchase now)

P8-3 Quantifying the Effect of Room Response on Automatic Speech Recognition SystemsJeremy Anderson, John Harris, University of Florida - Gainesville, FL, USA
It has been demonstrated that the acoustic environment has an impact on timbre and speech intelligibility. Automatic speech recognition is an established area that suffers from the negative effects of mismatch between different room impulse responses (RIR). To better understand the changes imparted by the RIR, we have created synthetic responses to simulate utterances recorded in different locations. Using speech recognition techniques to quantify our results, we then looked for trends in performance to connect with impulse response changes.
Convention Paper 7548 (Purchase now)

P8-4 In Situ Determination of Acoustic Absorption CoefficientsScott Mallais, University of Waterloo - Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
The determination of absorption characteristics for a given material is developed for in situ measurements. Experiments utilize maximum length sequences and a single microphone. The sound pressure is modeled using the compact source approximation. Emphasis is placed on low frequency resolution that is dependent on the geometry of both the loudspeaker-microphone-sample configuration and the room in which the measurement is performed. Methods used to overcome this limitation are discussed. The concept of the acoustic center is applied in the low frequency region, modifying the calculation of the absorption coefficient.
Convention Paper 7549 (Purchase now)

P8-5 Head-Related Transfer Function Customization by Frequency Scaling and Rotation Shift Based on a New Morphological Matching MethodPierre Guillon, Laboratoire d’Acoustique de l’Université du Maine - Le Mans, France, and Orange Labs, Lannion, France; Thomas Guignard, Rozenn Nicol, Orange Labs - Lannion, France
Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTFs) individualization is required to achieve high quality Virtual Auditory Spaces. An alternative to acoustic measurements is the customization of non-individual HRTFs. To transform HRTF data, we propose a combination of frequency scaling and rotation shifts, whose parameters are predicted by a new morphological matching method. Mesh models of head and pinnae are acquired, and differences in size and orientation of pinnae are evaluated with a modified Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. Optimal HRTF transformations are computed in parallel. A relatively good correlation between morphological and transformation parameters is found and allows one to predict the customization parameters from the registration of pinna shapes. The resulting model achieves better customization than frequency scaling only, which shows that adding the rotation degree of freedom improves HRTF individualization.
Convention Paper 7550 (Purchase now)


Friday, October 3, 12:00 pm — 2:30 pm

TT5 - Singer V7 Studios/Universal Audio, San Francisco


Abstract:
Four-time Emmy Award-Winning Composer/Producer/Performer/Writer, & Director Scott Singer has been at the cutting edge of technology-based entertainment for three decades. Most recently Mr. Singer was the Technical Musical Director and Assistant Director for the High-Definition DVD live recordings of Boz Scaggs’ Jazz Album and Greatest Hits, and the HD simulcast of the San Francisco Opera Rigoletto.

Now in its 24th year of operation, Singer Productions and Singer Studios V7 continues to serve as a state of the art recording facility for both Mr. Singer’s projects as well as many other talented recording artists and performers. Scott has just completed a full studio remodel (Version 7) adding the world’s first Bentley Edition Recording Suite—featuring a custom British mixing desk from John Oram/Trident, the “GP40,” as well as classic high-end components from Neve, SSL, Universal Audio, RCA, and GML.

State of the Emulation

Dave Berners will be co-presenting an answering questions on plug-in
emulations. They will demo UA gear, with in-studio live vocals by singer
Kyah Doran.

Note: Maximum of 30 participants per tour.


Price: $30 (members), $40 (nonmembers)

Friday, October 3, 1:00 pm — 2:00 pm

Lunchtime Keynote: Dave Giovannoni of First Sounds


Abstract:
Before Edison—Recovering the World's First Audio Recordings

First Sounds, an informal collaborative of audio engineers and historians, recently corrected the historical record and made international headlines by playing back a phonautogram made in Paris in April 1860—a ghostly, ten-second evocation of a French folk song. This and other phonautograms establish a forgotten French typesetter as the first person to record reproducible airborne sound 17 years before Edison invented the phonograph. Primitive and nearly accidental, the world’s first audio recordings pose a unique set of technical challenges. David Giovannoni of First Sounds discusses their recovery and restoration and will premiere two newly restored recordings.


Friday, October 3, 2:00 pm — 4:45 pm

Recording Competition - Surround


Abstract:
The Student Recording Competition is a highlight at each convention. A distinguished panel of judges participates in critiquing finalists of each category in an interactive presentation and discussion. Student members can submit stereo and surround recordings in the categories classical, jazz, folk/world music, and pop/rock. Meritorious awards will be presented at the closing Student Delegate Assembly Meeting on Sunday.


Friday, October 3, 2:00 pm — 6:00 pm

TT6 - Tarpan Studios/Ursa Minor Arts & Media, San Rafael


Abstract:
World-renowned producer/artist Narada Michael Walden has owned this gem-like studio for over twenty years. During that time artists such as Aretha Franklin, Whitney Houston, Mariah Carey, Steve Winwood, Kenny G, and Sting have recorded gold and platinum albums here. The tour will also include URSA Minor Arts & Media, an innovative web and multimedia production company.

Note: Maximum of 20 participants per tour.


Price: $35 (members), $45 (nonmembers)

Friday, October 3, 2:30 pm — 4:00 pm

Compressors—A Dynamic Perspective


Moderator:
Fab Dupont
Panelists:
Dave Derr
Wade Goeke
Dave Hill
Hutch Hutchison
George Massenburg
Rupert Neve

Abstract:
A device that, some might say, is being abused by those involved in the “loudness wars,” the dynamic range compressor can also be a very creative tool. But how exactly does it work? Six of the audio industry’s top designers and manufacturers lift the lid on one of the key components in any recording, broadcast or live sound signal chain. They will discuss the history, philosophy and evolution of this often misunderstood processor. Is one compressor design better than another? What design features work best for what application? The panel will also reveal the workings behind the mysteries of feedback and feed-forward designs, side-chains, and hard and soft knees, and explore the uses of multiband, parallel and serial compression.


Friday, October 3, 2:30 pm — 5:00 pm

TT8 - Singer V7 Studios/Universal Audio, San Francisco


Abstract:
Four-time Emmy Award-Winning Composer/Producer/Performer/Writer, and Director Scott Singer has been at the cutting edge of technology-based entertainment for three decades. Most recently Mr. Singer was the Technical Musical Director and Assistant Director for the High-Definition DVD live recordings of Boz Scaggs’ Jazz Album and Greatest Hits, and the HD simulcast of the San Francisco Opera Rigoletto.

Now in its 24th year of operation, Singer Productions and Singer Studios V7 continues to serve as a state of the art recording facility for both Mr. Singer’s projects as well as many other talented recording artists and performers. Scott has just completed a full studio remodel (Version 7) adding the world’s first Bentley Edition Recording Suite—featuring a custom British mixing desk from John Oram/Trident, the “GP40,” as well as classic high-end components from Neve, SSL, Universal Audio, RCA, and GML.

State of the Emulation

Dave Berners will be co-presenting an answering questions on plug-in
emulations. They will demo UA gear, with in-studio live vocals by singer
Kyah Doran.

Note: Maximum of 30 participants per tour.


Price: $30 (members), $40 (nonmembers)

Friday, October 3, 4:00 pm — 6:45 pm

B6 - History of Audio Processing


Chair:
Emil Torick
Panelists:
Dick Burden
Marvin Caesar, Aphex
Glen Clark, Glen Clark & Associates
Mike Dorrough, Dorrough Electronics
Frank Foti, Omnia
Greg J. Ogonowski, Orban/CRL
Bob Orban, Orban/CRL
Eric Small, Modulation Sciences

Abstract:
The participants of this session pioneered audio processing and developed the tools we still use today. A discussion of the developments, technology, and the “Loudness Wars” will take place. This session is a must if you want to understand how and why audio processing is used.


Friday, October 3, 4:30 pm — 7:00 pm

TT9 - Singer V7 Studios/Universal Audio, San Francisco


Abstract:
Four-time Emmy Award-Winning Composer/Producer/Performer/Writer, & Director Scott Singer has been at the cutting edge of technology-based entertainment for three decades. Most recently Mr. Singer was the Technical Musical Director and Assistant Director for the High-Definition DVD live recordings of Boz Scaggs’ Jazz Album and Greatest Hits, and the HD simulcast of the San Francisco Opera Rigoletto.

Now in its 24th year of operation, Singer Productions and Singer Studios V7 continues to serve as a state of the art recording facility for both Mr. Singer’s projects as well as many other talented recording artists and performers. Scott has just completed a full studio remodel (Version 7) adding the world’s first Bentley Edition Recording Suite—featuring a custom British mixing desk from John Oram/Trident, the “GP40,” as well as classic high-end components from Neve, SSL, Universal Audio, RCA, and GML.

State of the Emulation

Dave Berners will be co-presenting an answering questions on plug-in
emulations. They will demo UA gear, with in-studio live vocals by singer
Kyah Doran.

Note: Maximum of 30 participants per tour.


Price: $30 (members), $40 (nonmembers)

Friday, October 3, 5:00 pm — 6:30 pm

W7 - Same Techniques, Different Technologies—Recurring Strategies for Producing Game, Web, and Mobile Audio


Chair:
Peter Drescher
Panelists:
Steve Horowitz, NickOnline
George "The Fatman" Sanger, Legendary Game Audio Guru
Guy Whitmore, Microsoft Game Studio

Abstract:
When any new technology develops, the limitations of current systems are inevitably met. Bandwidth constraints then generate a class of techniques designed to maximize information transfer. Over time as bottlenecks expand, new kinds of applications become possible, making previous methods and file formats obsolete. By the time broadband access becomes available, we can observe a similar progression taking place in the next developing technology. The workshop discusses this trend as exhibited in the gaming, Internet, and mobile industries, with particular emphasis on audio file types and compression techniques. The presenter will compare and contrast obsolete tricks of the trade with current practices and invite industry veterans to discuss the trend from their points of view. Finally the panel makes predictions about the evolution of media.


Friday, October 3, 5:15 pm — 6:45 pm

W8 - Low Frequency Measurements of Loudspeakers


Chair:
Scott Orth, Polk Audio
Panelists:
Marshall Buck
David Clark
Laurie Fincham
Don Keele
Steve Temme

Abstract:
Measuring the low end of a loudspeaker is a difficult task. Given the wavelengths involved, most indoor spaces conspire to create a less than ideal environment. In this workshop, industry experts will present some of the practical methods used to perform measurements under these circumstances. Pros and cons of these methods and others will be discussed. Correlation between measurement and model will also be discussed. CEA2010 is a consumer oriented standard recently released by the CEA which specifies the performance of subwoofers. We will examine this standard and how measurements for it are conducted.


Friday, October 3, 5:30 pm — 6:45 pm

T8 - Free Source Code for Processing AES Audio Data


Presenters:
Gregg C. Hawkes, Xilinx - San Jose, CA, USA
Reed Tidwell, Xilinx - San Jose, CA, USA

Abstract:
This session is a tutorial on the Xilinx free Verilog and VHDL source code for extracting and inserting audio in SDI streams, including “on the fly” error correction and high performance, continuously adaptive, asynchronous sample rate conversion. The audio sample rate conversion supports large ratios as well as fractional conversion rates and maintains high performance while continuously adapting itself to the input and output rates without user control. The features, device utilization, and performance of the IP will be presented and demonstrated with industry standard audio hardware.


Saturday, October 4, 9:00 am — 10:45 am

B7 - DTV Audio Myth Busters


Chair:
Jim Kutzner, PBS
Panelists:
Robert Bleidt, Fraunhofer USA Digital Media Technologies
Tim Carroll, Linear Acoustic, Inc.
Ken Hunold, Dolby Laboratories
David Wilson, Consumer Electronics Association

Abstract:
There is no limit to the confusion created by the audio options in DTV. What do the systems really do? What happens when the systems fail? How much control can be exercised at each step in the content food chain? There are thousands of opinions and hundreds of options, but what really works and how do you keep things under control? Bring your questions and join the discussion as four experts from different stages in the chain try to sort it out.


Saturday, October 4, 9:00 am — 10:45 am

T9 - How I Does Filters: An Uneducated Person’s Way to Design Highly Regarded Digital Equalizers and Filters


Presenter:
Peter Eastty, Oxford Digital Limited - Oxfordshire, UK

Abstract:
Much has been written in many learned papers about the design of audio filters and equalizers, this is NOT another one of those. The presenter is a bear of little brain and has over the years had to reduce the subject of digital filtering into bite-sized lumps containing a number of simple recipes that have got him through most of his professional life. Complete practical implementations of high pass and low pass multi-order filters, bell (or presence) filters, and shelving filters including the infrequently seen higher order types. The tutorial is designed for the complete novice, it is light on mathematics and heavy on explanation and visualization—even so, the provided code works and can be put to practical use.


Saturday, October 4, 9:00 am — 10:30 am

W9 - Low Frequency Acoustic Issues in Small Critical Listening Environments - Today's Audio Production Rooms


Chair:
John Storyk
Panelists:
Renato Cipriano
Dave Kotch

Abstract:
Increasing real estate costs coupled with the reduced size of current audio control room equipment have dramatically impacted the current generation of recording studios. Small room environments (those under 300 s.f.) are now the norm for studio design. These rooms, particularly in view of current 5.1 audio requirements, create special challenges, associated with low frequency audio response in an ever expanding listening sweet spot. Real world conditions and result data will be presented for Ovesan Studios (New York), Roc the Mic Studios (New York), and Diante Do Trono (Brazil).


Saturday, October 4, 9:00 am — 10:30 am

T10 - New Technologies for Up to 7.1 Channel Playback in Any Game Console Format


Presenter:
Geir Skaaden, Neural Audio Corp. - Kirkland, WA, USA

Abstract:
This tutorial investigates methods for increasing the number of audio channels in a gaming console beyond its current hardware limitations. The audio engine within a game is capable of creating a 360 8 environment, however, the console hardware uses only a few channels to represent this world. If home playback systems are commonly able to reproduce up to 7.1 channels, how do game developers increase the number of playback channels for a platform that is limited to 2 or 5 outputs? New encoding technologies make this possible. Descriptions of current methods will be made in addition to new console independent technologies that run within the game engine. Game content will be used to demonstrate the encode/decode process.


Saturday, October 4, 10:00 am — 11:00 am

Listening Session


Abstract:
Students are encouraged to bring in their projects to a non-competitive listening session for feedback and comments from Dave Greenspan, a panel, and audience. Students will be able to sign up at the first SDA meeting for time slots. Students who are finalists in the Recording competition are excluded from this event to allow others who were not finalists the opportunity for feedback.


Saturday, October 4, 11:00 am — 1:00 pm

B8 - Lip Sync Issue


Chair:
Jonathan S. Abrams, Nutmeg Audio Post
Panelists:
Scott Anderson, Syntax-Brillian
Richard Fairbanks, Pharoah Editoial, Inc.
David Moulton, Sausalito Audio, LLC
Kent Terry, Dolby Laboratories

Abstract:
This is a complex problem, with several causes and fewer solutions. From production to broadcast, there are many points in the signal path and postproduction process where lip sync can either be properly corrected, or made even worse.

This session’s panel will discuss several key issues. Where do the latency issues exist in postproduction? Where do they exist in broadcast? Is there an acceptable window of latency? How can this latency be measured? What correction techniques exist? Does one type of video display exhibit less latency than another? What is being done in display design to address the latency? What proposed methods are on the horizon for addressing this issue in the future?

Join us as our panel covers the field from measurement, to post, to broadcast, and to the home.


Saturday, October 4, 11:00 am — 12:00 pm

T11 - [Canceled]



Saturday, October 4, 11:30 am — 1:00 pm

Platinum Mastering


Moderator:
Bob Ludwig
Panelists:
Bernie Grundman, Bernie Grundman Mastering - Hollywood, CA, USA
Scott Hull, Scott Hull Mastering/Masterdisk - New York, NY, USA
Herb Powers Jr., Powers Mastering Studios - Orlando, FL, USA
Doug Sax, The Matering Lab - Ojai, CA, USA

Abstract:
In this session moderated by mastering legend Bob Ludwig, mastering all-stars talk about the craft and business of mastering and answer audience questions—including queries submitted in advance by students at top recording colleges. Panelists include Bernie Grundman of Bernie Grundman Mastering, Hollywood; Scott Hull of Scott Hull Mastering/Masterdisk, New York; Herb Powers Jr. of Powers Mastering Studios, Orlando, Fla.; and Doug Sax of The Mastering Lab, Ojai, Calif.


Saturday, October 4, 1:00 pm — 2:00 pm

Lunchtime Keynote:
Peter Gotcher
of Topspin Media


Abstract:
The Music Business Is Dead—Long Live the NEW Music Business!

Peter Gotcher will deliver a high-level view of the changing business models facing the music industry today. Gotcher will explain why it no longer works for artists to derive their income from record labels that provide a tiny share of high volume sales. He will also explore new revenue models that include multiple revenue streams for artists; the importance of getting rid of unproductive middlemen; and generating more revenue from fewer fans.


Saturday, October 4, 2:00 pm — 4:00 pm

TT14 - WAM Studios, San Francisco


Abstract:
Women's Audio Mission is a San Francisco-based, non-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of women in music production and the recording arts. In a field where women are chronically under-represented (less than 5%), WAM seeks to "change the face of sound" by providing hands-on training, experience, career counseling, and job placement to women and girls in media technology for music, radio, film, television, and the internet. WAM believes that women's mastery of music technology and inclusion in the production process will expand the vision and voice of media and popular culture.

Note: Maximum of 20 participants per tour.


Price: $30 (members), $40 (nonmembers)

Saturday, October 4, 2:30 pm — 6:30 pm

Recording Competition - Stereo


Abstract:
The Student Recording Competition is a highlight at each convention. A distinguished panel of judges participates in critiquing finalists of each category in an interactive presentation and discussion. Student members can submit stereo and surround recordings in the categories classical, jazz, folk/world music, and pop/rock. Meritorious awards will be presented at the closing Student Delegate Assembly Meeting on Sunday.


Saturday, October 4, 2:30 pm — 4:30 pm

L9 - Digital and Networked Audio in Sound Reinforcement


Chair:
Bradford Benn, Crown International
Panelists:
Steve Gray
Rick Kreifeldt
Steve Macatee
Demetrius Palavos
David Revel

Abstract:
This event promises a discussion of the challenges and planning involved with deploying digital audio in the sound reinforcement environment. The panel will cover not just the use of digital audio but some of the factors that need to be covered during the design and application of audio systems. While no one solution fits every application, after this panel discussion you will be better able to understand what needs to be considered.


Saturday, October 4, 2:30 pm — 4:30 pm

T12 - Damping of the Room Low-Frequency Acoustics (Passive and Active)


Presenters:
Reza Kashani, University of Dayton - Dayton, OH, USA
Jim Wischmeyer, Modular Sound Systems, Inc. - Lake Barrington, IL, USA

Abstract:
As the result of its size and geometry, a room excessively amplifies sound at certain frequencies. This is the result of standing waves (acoustic resonances/modes) of the room. These are waves whose original oscillation is continuously reinforced by their own reflections. Rooms have many resonances, but only the low-frequency ones are discrete, distinct, unaffected by the sound absorbing material in the room, and accommodate most of the acoustic energy build-up in the room.


Saturday, October 4, 3:30 pm — 5:30 pm

Grammy SoundTable


Moderator:
Mike Clink, producer/engineer/entrepreneur (Guns N’ Roses, Sarah Kelly, Mötley Crüe)
Panelists:
Sylvia Massy, producer/engineer/entrepreneur (System of a Down, Johnny Cash, Econoline Crush)
Keith Olsen, producer/engineer/entrepreneur (Fleetwood Mac, Ozzy Osbourne, POGOLOGO Productions/MSR Acoustics)
Phil Ramone, producer/engineer/visionary (Elton John, Ray Charles, Shelby Lynne)
Carmen Rizzo, artist/producer/remixer (Seal, Paul Oakenfold, Coldplay)
John Vanderslice, artist/indie rock innovator/studio owner (MK Ultra, Mountain Goats, Spoon)

Abstract:
The 20th Annual GRAMMY Recording SoundTable is presented by the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences Inc. (NARAS) and hosted by AES.

YOU, Inc.! New Strategies for a New Economy

Today’s audio recording professional need only walk down the aisle of a Best Buy, turn on a TV, or listen to a cell phone ring to hear possibilities for new revenue streams and new applications to showcase their talents. From video games to live shows to ringbacks and 360 deals, money and opportunities are out there. It’s up to you to grab them.

For this special event the Producers & Engineers Wing has assembled an all-star cast of audio pros who’ll share their experiences and entrepreneurial expertise in creating opportunities in music and audio. You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, you’ll learn.


Saturday, October 4, 5:00 pm — 6:45 pm

B10 - Audio Transport


Chair:
David Prentice, VCA
Panelists:
Kevin Campbell, APT Ltd.
Chris Crump, Comrex
Angela DePascale, Global Digital Datacom Services Inc.
Herb Squire, DSI RF
Mike Uhl, Telos

Abstract:
This will be a discussion of techniques and technologies used for transporting audio (i.e., STL, RPU, codecs, etc.). Transporting audio can be complex. This will be a discussion of various roads you can take.


Saturday, October 4, 5:00 pm — 6:30 pm

P21 - Low Bit-Rate Audio Coding


P21-1 A Framework for a Near-Optimal Excitation Based Rate-Distortion Algorithm for Audio CodingMiikka Vilermo, Nokia Research Center - Tampere, Finland
An optimal excitation based rate-distortion algorithm remains an elusive target in audio coding. Typical complexity of the problem for one frame alone is in the order of 6050. This paper presents a framework for reducing the complexity. Excitation is calculated using cochlear filters that have relatively steep slopes above and below the central frequency of the filter. An approximation of the excitation can be calculated by limiting the cochlear filters to a small frequency region. For example, the cochlear filters may span 15 subbands. In this way, the complexity can be reduced approximately to the order of 6015•50.
Convention Paper 7621 (Purchase now)

P21-2 Audio Bandwidth Extension by Frequency Scaling of Sinusoidal PartialsTomasz Zernicki, Maciej Bartkowiak, Poznan University of Technology - Poznan, Poland
This paper describes a new technique of efficient coding of high-frequency signal components as an alternative to Spectral Band Replication. The main idea is to reconstruct the high frequency harmonic structure trajectories by using fundamental frequencies obtained at the encoder side. Audio signal is decomposed into narrow subbands by demodulation based on the local instantaneous fundamental frequency of individual partials. High frequency components are reconstructed by modulation of the baseband signals with appropriately scaled instantaneous frequencies. Such approach offers correct synthesis of rapidly changing sinusoids as well as proper reconstruction of harmonic structure in the high-frequency band. This technique allows correct energy adjustment over sinusoidal partials. The high efficiency of the proposed technique has been confirmed by listening tests.
Convention Paper 7622 (Purchase now)

P21-3 Robustness Issues in Multi-View Audio CodingMauri Väänänen, Nokia Research Center - Tampere, Finland
This paper studies the problem of noise unmasking when multiple spatial filtering options (multiple views) are required from multi-microphone recordings compressed with lossy coding. The envisaged application is re-use and postprocessing of user-created content. A potential solution based on inter-channel prediction is outlined, that would also allow subtractive downmix options without excessive noise unmasking. The simple case of two relatively closely spaced omnidirectional microphones and mono downmix is used as an example, experimenting with real-world recordings and MPEG-1 Layer 3 coding.
Convention Paper 7623 (Purchase now)

P21-4 Quality Improvement of Very Low Bit Rate HE-AAC Using Linear Prediction ModuleGunWoo Lee, JaeSeong Lee, University of Yonsei - Seoul, Korea; YoungCheol Park, University o Yonsei - Wonju-city, Korea; DaeHee Youn, University of Yonsei - Seoul, Korea
This paper proposes a new method of improving the quality of High Efficiency Advanced Audio Coding (HE-AAC) at very low bit rate under 16 kbps. Low bit rate HE-AAC often produces obvious spectral holes inducing musical noise in low energy frequency bands due to its limited number of available bits. In the proposed system, a linear prediction module is combined with HE-AAC as a pre-processor to reduce the spectral holes. For its efficient implementation, masking threshold of psychoacoustic model is normalized with LPC spectral envelope to quantize LPC residual signal with appropriate masking threshold. To reduce the pre-echo, we also modified the block switching module. Experimental results show that, at very low bit rate modes, the linear prediction module effectively reduce the spectral holes, which results in the reduction of musical noises compared to the conventional HE-AAC.
Convention Paper 7624 (Purchase now)

P21-5 An Implementation of MPEG-4 ALS Standard Compliant Decoder on ARM Core CPUsNoboru Harada, Takehiro Moriya, Yutaka Kamamoto, NTT Communication Science Labs. - Kanagawa, Japan
MPEG-4 Audio Lossless Coding (ALS) is a standard that losslessly compresses audio signals in an efficient manner. MPEG-4 ALS is a suitable compression scheme for high-sound-quality portable music players. We have implemented a decoderder compliant with the MPEG-4 ALS standard on the ARM platform. In this paper the required CPU resources for MPEG-4 ALS tools on ARM9E are characterized by using an ARM CPU emulator, called ARMulator, as a simulation platform. It is shown that the required CPU clock cycle for decoding MPEG-4 ALS standard compliant bit streams is less than 20 MHz for 44.1-kHz/16-bit, stereo signals on ARM9E when the combination of the MPEG-4 ALS tools is properly selected and coding parameters are properly restricted.
Convention Paper 7625 (Purchase now)


Saturday, October 4, 6:00 pm — 7:00 pm

MIX Foundation 2008 TECnology Hall of Fame


Abstract:
Hosted by Mix Magazine Executive Editor/TECnology Hall of Fame director George Petersen.

Presented annually by the Mix Foundation for Excellence in Audio to honor significant, lasting contributions to the advancement of audio technology, this year's event will recognize fifteen audio innovations. "It is interesting to note how many of these products are still in daily use decades after their introduction," Petersen says. "These aren't simply museum pieces, but working tools. We're proud to recognize their significance to the industry."


Sunday, October 5, 9:00 am — 10:45 am

W10 - File Formats for Interactive Applications and Games


Chair:
Chris Grigg, Beatnik, Inc.
Panelists:
Christof Faller, Illusonic LLC
John Lazzaro, University of California, Berkeley
Juergen Schmidt, Thomson

Abstract:
There are a number of different standards covering file formats that may be applicable to interactive or game applications. However, some of these older formats have not been widely adopted and newer formats may not yet be very well known. Other formats may be used in non-interactive applications but may be equally suitable to interactive applications. This tutorial reviews the requirements of an interactive file format. It presents an overview of currently available formats and discusses their suitability to certain interactive applications. The panel will discuss why past efforts at interactive audio standards have not made it to product and look to widely-adopted standards in related fields (graphics and networking) in order to borrow their successful traits for future standards. The workshop is presented by a number of experts who have been involved in the standardization or development of these formats. The formats
covered include Ambisonics B-Format, MPEG-4 object coding, MPEG-4 Structured Audio Orchestral Language, MPEG-4 Audio BIFS, and the upcoming iXMF standard.


Sunday, October 5, 9:00 am — 10:45 am

B11 - Internet Streaming—Audio Quality, Measurement, and Monitoring


Chair:
David Bialik
Panelists:
Ray Archie, CBS Radio
Rusty Hodge, SomaFM
Benjamin Larson, Streambox, Inc.
Greg J. Ogonowski, Orban/CRL
Skip Pizzi, Contributing Editor, Radio World magazine
Geir Skaaden, Neural Audio Corp.

Abstract:
Internet Streaming has become a provider of audio and video content to the public. Now that the public has recognized the medium, the provider needs to deliver the content with a quality comparable to other mediums. Audio monitoring is becoming important, and a need to quantify the performance is important so that the streamer can deliver product of a standard quality.


Sunday, October 5, 9:00 am — 11:00 am

B12 - Art of Sound Effects—Performance to Production


Panelists:
David Shinn
Sue Zizza

Abstract:
Sound effects: footsteps, doors opening and closing, a bump in the night. These are the sounds that can take the flat one-dimensional world of audio, television, and film and turn them into realistic three-dimensional environments. From the early days of radio to the sophisticated modern day High Def Surround Sound of contemporary film; sound effects have been the final color on the director's palatte. Join Sound Effects and Foley Artists Sue Zizza and David Shinn of SueMedia Productions as they present a 90 minute session that explores the art of sound effects; creating and performing manual effects; recording sound effects with a variety of microphones; and using various primary sound effect elements for audio, video and film projects.


Sunday, October 5, 11:00 am — 1:00 pm

W11 - Upcoming MPEG Standard for Efficient Parametric Coding and Rendering of Audio Objects


Chair:
Oliver Hellmuth, Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS
Panelists:
Jonas Engdegård
Christof Faller
Jürgen Herre
Leon van de Kerkhof

Abstract:
Through exploiting the human perception of spatial sound, “Spatial Audio Coding” technology enabled new ways of low bit-rate audio coding for multichannel signals. Following the finalization of the MPEG Surround specification, ISO/MPEG launched a follow-up standardization activity for bit-rate-efficient and backward compatible coding of several sound objects. On the receiving side, such a Spatial Audio Object Coding (SAOC) system renders the objects interactively into a sound scene on a reproduction setup of choice. The workshop reviews the ideas, principles, and prominent applications behind Spatial Audio Object Coding and reports on the status of the ongoing ISO/MPEG Audio standardization activities in this field. The benefits of the new approach will be highlighted and illustrated by means of real-time demonstrations.


Sunday, October 5, 2:30 pm — 4:00 pm

W12 - Revolt of the Mastering Engineers


Chair:
Paul Stubblebine
Panelists:
Greg Calbi
Bernie Grundman
Michael Romanowski

Abstract:
Mastering engineer Bernie Grundman has started a label, Straight Ahead Records, to record music he and his partners like in a straight-ahead recording fashion, and is putting it out on vinyl. Greg Calbi and the other mastering engineers at Sterling have started a vinyl label. A couple of mastering engineers, Paul Stubblebine and Michael Romanowski have started a re-issue label putting out music they love on 15 IPS half track reel to reel (www.tapeproject.com).

What’s behind this trend? Why are mastering engineers giving up their non-existent free time to start labels based on obsolete technologies? What does this say about the current state of recorded music?


Sunday, October 5, 2:30 pm — 4:00 pm

W13 - Wanna Feel My LFE? And 51 Other Questions to Scare Your Grandma


Panelists:
Florian Camerer, ORF – Austrian TV
Bosse Ternstrom, Swedish Radio

Abstract:
Florian Camerer, ORF, and Bosse Ternstrom, Swedish Radio, are two veterans of surround sound production and mixing. In this workshop a multitude of diverse examples will be played, with controversial styles, wildly differing mixing techniques, earth shaking low frequency effects, and dynamic range that lives up to its name! Be prepared for a rollercoaster ride through multichannel audio wonderland!


Sunday, October 5, 2:30 pm — 4:00 pm

W14 - Navigating the Technology Mine Field in Game Audio


Chair:
Marc Schaefgen, Midway Games
Panelists:
Rich Carle, Midway Games
Clark Crawford, Midway Games
Kristoffer Larson, Midway Games

Abstract:
In the early days of game audio systems, tools and assets were all developed and produced in-house. The growth of the games industry has resulted in larger audio teams with separate groups dedicated to technology or content creation. The breadth of game genres and number of “specialisms” required to create the technology and content for a game have mandated that developers look out of house for some of their game audio needs.

In this workshop the panel discusses the changing needs of the game-audio industry and the models that a studio typically uses to produce the audio for a game. The panel consists of a number of audio directors from different first-party studios owned by Midway games. They will examine the current middleware market and explain how various tools are used by their studios in the audio production chain. The panel also explains how out-of-house musicians or sound designers are outsourced as part of the production process.


Sunday, October 5, 2:30 pm — 4:30 pm

T18 - FPGA for Broadcast Audio


Presenters:
John Lancken, Fairlight Pty LTD - Frenchs Forest, Australia
Girish Malipeddi, Altera Corporation - San Jose, CA, USA

Abstract:
This tutorial presents broadcast-quality solutions based on FPGA technology for audio processing with significant cost savings over existing discrete solutions. The solutions include digital audio interfaces such as AES3/SPDIF and I2S, audio processing functions such as sample rate converters and SDI audio embed/de-embed functions. Along with these solutions, an audio video framework that consists of a suite of A/V functions, reference designs, an open interface to easily stitch the AV blocks, system design methodology, and development kits is introduced. Using the framework system designers can quickly prototype and rapidly develop complex audio video systems.


Sunday, October 5, 4:30 pm — 6:00 pm

W15 - Interactive MIDI-Based Technologies for Game Audio


Chair:
Steve Martz, THX Ltd.
Panelists:
Chris Grigg, IASIG
Larry the O
Tom Savell, Creative Labs

Abstract:
The MIDI Manufacturers Ass’n (MMA) has developed three new standards for MIDI-based technologies with applications in game audio. The 3-D MIDI Controllers specification allows for real-time positioning and movement of music and sound sources in 3-D space, under MIDI control. The Interactive XMF specification marks the first nonproprietary file format for portable, cue-oriented interactive audio and MIDI content with integrated scripting. Finally, the MMA is working toward a completely new, and drastically simplified, 32-bit version of the MIDI message protocol for use on modern transports and software APIs, called the HD Protocol for MIDI Devices.