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117th AES CONVENTION PRESS RELEASE

Contact: Howard Sherman
+1 (212) 777 4711
117th_press@aes.org
FOR RELEASE: 10/18/04

25 TUTORIALS EPITOMIZE RANGE OF
117th AES CONVENTION SPHERE OF INTEREST

Ron Streicher Plans The “Ultimate Hands-On Session”

SAN FRANCISCO:
The diverse series of programs coordinated by 117th AES Convention Tutorial Chair Bob Moses epitomizes the broad sphere of interests held by the organization’s 12,000 + members. Among the twenty-five sessions are subjects geared to appeal to virtually every branch of the industry. Convention Chair John Strawn remarked that, “Anyone interested in professional audio, whether established working engineer or fledgling student, will find a wealth of useful information to help advance their careers.”

Evolving into one of the most successful Conventions in AES history, the 117th has attracted over 400 exhibitors and anticipates 18,000 attendees. The Convention will be held at the Moscone Center, Thurs., Oct. 28 – Sun., Oct. 31.

Tutorials of particular interest include:

Thursday, October 28, 9:00 am – 11:00 am
T1 PHYSICS OF SOUND AND HEARING
Presenter:
J.J. Johnston, Microsoft will present basic acoustic and psychoacoustic issues and phenomenon, and relate them to the practice of digital audio. Among the topics to be covered are: Low and High frequencies, and how they propagate; How one ear hears; What is masking and why do I care about it?

Thursday, October 28, 9:00 am – 11:00 am
T2 SUBJECTIVE MICROPHONE COMPARISONS Presenter: Jürgen Wahl, Sennheiser/Neumann, USA will analyze the variables that make it so difficult to predict a microphone’s performance in actual applications, and why microphones with seemingly identical technical specifications sound differently, even when used under the same circumstances.

Thursday, October 28, 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
T5 ACOUSTICS –2 Presenter: Anthony Grimani, Performance Media Industries, Ltd
The acoustical properties of a room highly influence the perceived sonic quality of any monitoring system. Grimani will focus on applications for small room acoustics, such as recording studios, project studios, listening rooms, screening rooms, home theaters. Simple recipes for improving quality and consistency will be discussed.

Thursday, October 28, 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm
T6 LIVE ORGAN CONCERT RECORDING Presenter: Ron Streicher, Pacific Audio-Visual Enterprises, Pasadena, CA, USA has devised the ultimate “hands-on” session. Everyone who attends will be directly involved with the setup and recording of Graham Blyth's Organ Concert at Grace Cathedral.  Assignments will include everything from unloading the van through microphone selection, cable routing and taping for safety, choice of recording formats for stereo and surround and reloading the van following the concert.  All aspects of this process will be thoroughly discussed during the setup process.


Friday, October 29, 9:00 am – 11:00 am
T7 THE BASICS OF DIGITAL AUDIO: A Seminar with Demonstrations: Presenters
Stanley Lipshitz & John Vanderkooy, Audio Research Group, University of Waterloo, Canada have devised an introductory-level seminar to explain and demonstrate two fundamental aspects of any digital audio system -- sampling and quantization. Both operations will be discussed and illustrated in real-time using a custom-built sampler and quantizer.

Friday, October 29, 9:00 am – 11:00 am
T8 MICROPHONE TECHNIQUES FOR MUSIC
Presenter:
Bruce Bartlett, Crown International will explore the theory and practice of microphone techniques for music recording (mic choice and placement). The first half of the presentation explains microphone transducer types, frequency response, polar patterns, and the advantages of each. The second half describes several microphone techniques in common use for specific instruments and vocals. Both multi-miking and stereo miking are covered.

Friday, October 29, 11:30 am – 1:30 pm
T9 ALL ABOUT LOOPING AND TIME-STRETCH TECHNOLOGIES Presenter Craig Anderton, EQ Magazine will describe several technologies currently available to change the pitch and timing of digital audio, which are best suited to which applications, how to optimize stretching technologies, workarounds for existing problems, and how these technologies are applied in musical contexts. Anderton will employ extensive use of real world audio examples expand on and illustrate the concepts.


Saturday, October 30, 9:00 am – 11:00 am
T16 SURROUND SOUND FOR PICTURE, DRAMATURGICAL GOALS - TOOLS AND CONCEPTS: Presenter Florian Camerer of ORF - Austrian TV will trace several surround-sound- design-concepts down to their deeper psychological roots. 5.1 is primarily engaged by feature films and home theater DVDs as a means to heighten the viewing experience. Although a set of dramaturgical tools for raising the listening/viewing experience through proper use of the additional channels exist, many are exclusively based on the concept of "what works and what doesn’t work. Camerer will present advanced solutions which go beyond what is possible (dramaturgically) in the cinema world.

Saturday, October 30, 4:30 pm – 6:30 pm
T22 MASTERING FOR STEREO AND SURROUND Gateway Mastering principal Bob Ludwig will present a Tutorial on Stereo and Surround Sound mastering. Still a somewhat misunderstood topic, mastering remains the final creative step in the record making chain. One which determines how the final CD or DVD will sound. Ludwig will discuss many aspects of mastering with emphasis on the many creative decisions that need to be made.

Saturday, October 30, 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
T19 ANALOG DESIGN IN A DIGITAL ENVIRONMENT: Dennis Bohn, Rick Jeffs and Paul Mathews of the Rane Corporation have devised a fast-paced overview of the problems faced by analog audio designers working in the mixed analog-digital environment found in most pro audio products. Topics include how to bring in low-level signals, maintain fidelity and SNR, provide high gain and buffering, supply clean power, and deliver high quality signals on the output side, all within the context of a hostile environment both inside and outside the product housing. Examples of gotchas and do’s and don’ts in chassis design, circuit design, and circuit board layout will highlight the session.


Sunday, October 31, 9:00 am – 11:00 am
T23 SYNCHRONIZATION Fred Katz of Omega Recording Studios suggests that no subject in audio engineering is more misunderstood by students and working professionals than synchronization. Its principles are derived from seemingly unrelated fields like television and video production, the math involved is unwieldy and often counterintuitive, and when is applied successfully its results are transparent and easily overlooked. He will attempt to clarify the fundamental principles of synchronization and illustrate how they can be applied by examining several common synchronization scenarios involving analog, digital, and video tape, MIDI, Pro Tools, and digital audio networks.

Sunday, October 31, 11:30 am – 1:30 pm
T25 ACOUSTIC ISSUES CONCERNING SMALL STUDIO ENVIRONMENTS: John Storyk, Walters-Storyk Design Group suggests that contrary to many beliefs, small studio environments present a special breed of acoustic issues, some in common but many unique to the small size of both recording and listening rooms. Storyk’s tutorial will investigate many of these issues, including: low frequency control, speaker placement, ergonomic design, including listening positioning, furniture design and other object effects on room acoustic response.

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